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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Descendants of Francis de Bourdon

Source Citations


549. Perry Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 118 - 119, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "PERRY, born in Tiverton November 1739, received his education there. His early life was spent in cultivating his father's farm and aiding him surveying, by which practice he soon acquired a good knowledge of the art,  and qualified himself for the expedition on which he afterwards entered with a numerous company of adventurers. Soon after the expulsion of the neutral French from Acadia, or as now called, Nova Scotia, a name given to it by the English, great efforts were made to by Governor Shirley of Massachusetts to resettle the valley once cultivated, by the French people, but then lying waste and deserted. The reported richness of the soil, the labor which had been bestowed upon it to bring it under tillage, and the offer of a free grant to every actual settler of a good farm. presented an inducement sufficiently powerful to attract the attention of young men of small means who were amibitious of acquiring a competency for themselves and families if they  should  have any. During the winter of 1759 a company of emigrants was organized of one hundred and fifty persons from New England. Of this company Perry Borden was one, though he may not have gone there with any fixed determination to settle; he probably went as an assistant to his father who was commissioned by Governor Shirley to survey the lands and exercise a general supervision over the emigrants till they were located on their several allotments. When this duty had been performed, Samuel Borden returned home (1761) and left his son Perry.  who concluded to settle there with the company, and as a preliminary step he married Emma Percy, the daughter of an English officer, 1761 he being twenty-two years of age. By her he had two sons, Samuel and Joseph. His wife dying, he married for his second wife Mary Ells. October 22, 1767, by whom he had nine other sons, which comprised all his family. These sons are now all dead except one, Edward. David and Benjamin died 1865. and Perry died 1862. As this family lived so remote I thought a description of the country they inhabit and some general account of them would be interesting to their relatives here. Accordingly I wrote to Jonathan R Borden, Esq., on the subject. and he has very kindly and very promptly furnished me with the following narrative, which I trust will be acceptable to others as it has been to myself:
"Skirting the southern shore of the Bay of Fundy, which forms the northwest boundary of Nova Scotia, is a range of hills, dignified by the appellation of the North Mountalns. These extend from Cape Blomidor on the east, jutting out Into the basin of Miinas to Digby Neck on the west, a distance of more than one hundred miles. On its southern side it forms n abrupt declivity some four hundred to five hundred feet in height. About twelve miles distant from this range may be seen the sloping terrace of the South Mountains running nearly parallel, and rising gradually to about the same height. Between these chains of hills may be seen a level and beautiful valley bounded at its two extremeties by the Basin of Minas and the Atlantic Ocean. This valley has been the scene of the most interesting events connected with the history of the province. In the western part is the town of Annapolis, formerly called Port Royal, founded by the French explorers, Demots and Pontrincourt, in the year 1604, being, I think, the first settlement of Europeans on this continent. This town was for nearly one hundred and fifty years the capital of all Acadia and figured considerably in the wars which, during that period, occurred between the English and French.  The surrounding country was also occupied by the followers of Pontrincourt who have been since known in provincial history as the French Acadians. The eastern part of this valley, now Horton and Cornwallis, the latter comprisiing the eastern part of the North Mountain and extending nearly across the valley; the former lying along the base and extending up the base of the South Mountain, were also occupied at a very early period by the Acadians, a hardy and industrious race. Here they lived for most part in peace, felling the forest, reclaiming the marshes, cultivating and improving their land, and securing it for themselves and their familiies a comfortable independence until 1755, when on account of refusing to take the oath of allegiance to Great Britain they were by an edict of Governor Lawrence expelled from their homes and scattered among the other colonies (from Maine to Georgia.) The character and mode of life of this people. their expulsion and subsequent sufferings form the subject of Longfellow's touching story of Evangellne. Whether this act of government was junttifiable or not remains a question which we have."

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., pg 120. "little means of determining. for even we who live upon their lands and walk over their graves, know but little more of them than any one may learn from the fanciful sketch of the poet."
 It was these lands. thus deserted and offered without purchase to the New England colonists that induced the company of emigrants to which Samuel Borden and his son Perry belonged, to leave their old homes and settle in the more remote province of Nova Scotia. The band of "first settlers" consisted of one hundred and fifty individuals. They landed on the 8th of June. 1760, at a place which, on account of its being first selected as the site of a future town. is still known as "the town plot" though the town had never been built. The settlers immediately obtained a grant of two hundred and fifty thousand acres or thereabouts to which they gave the name of Cornwallis after that of General Edward Cornwallis, who had previously commanded the English troops in Nova Scotia and who in 1719 laid the foundation of Halifax by erecting government storehouses and barracks for the British army. In 1750 this collection of buildings and their surroundings received the name Halifax, a mark of respect to Lord Halifax, then president of the Board of Trade. This Edward Cornwallis was the brother of Lord Cornwallis who figured in the war of independence some years later. Cornwallis, Aylfsford and Horton form Kings County which includes all, or nearly so of the lands cultivated by the Acadians, with large tracts of woodland on the North and South Mountains. On taking possession of their lands the newly-installed owners proceeded to divide them into one hundred and fifty shares. The most valuable portion of Cornwallis is the valley which now contains the greater part of the population and of the wealth, and which has been styled the garden of the province. It is certain that few places possess greater agricultural capabilities. Though situated in 45 north latitude, owing to its sheltered position and the near proximity of large bodies of salt water, its climate is milder and less changeable than many places farther south. The soil when enriched is very productive, especially in potatoes and all the varieties of fruit and vegetables adapted to the climate. The upland hay crop is generally light, owing to the peculiar nature of the soil, but this deficiency is supplied to a great extent by the large and valuable marshes which skirt the banks of the numerous rivers running into the interior. These lands deserve more than a passing notice to give a correct idea of the agriculture of Cornwallis and Horton, for it is through those that they have acquired and maintained their high position as a farming country. This alluvial soil is a marine deposit peculiar to those parts which are washed by the rapidly flowing tides of the Bay of Fundy. Near its head this bay separates into two parts, the first includes Minas Bay and basin and Cobequid Bay, both lying in Nova Scotia: the second part in Chignecto Bay, which nearly separates Nova Scotia from the mainland, leaving an isthmus only fourteen miles wide. It is only in the first two bays that the tides attain their greatest force and height;."

3Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., pg 121-123. "the extreme height being, at high spring tides, about sixty feet, while at the entrance of the bay at St. Johns it is about thirty feet. The Bay of Fundy, being forty miles wide at its entrance and one hundred and forty miles long, the ebb and flow of such a body of water twice every twenty-five hours must produce a very strong and rapid current. The retreating tide leaves some of the rivers bare, but the appearance of the first flow or bore, as it is called, up these rivers, is rather a reculiar sight. At high spring tides an almost perpendicular wall of water, from two to five feet high moves majestically along at the rate of two to five miles per hour, the velocity being in proportion to the height of the bore. Small boats stand but little chance in its way and even large ones require to be managed with great care and skill to insure their safety under such circumstances. It is by the action of these tides that the marshes already spoken of are formed. The shores are continually wearing away by the attrition of the water and the finer particles of the debris, with materials from other sources, are carried up the estuaries of the rivers and deposited either along their banks or at their heads. This operation being repeated twice every twenty-five hours, large mounds are formed high above ordinary high water mark, and then a dyke either across the stream or along its banks effectually excludes any further encroachment or the water. In this way lands are reclaimed which in natural fertility are excelled by none perhaps in the world. After a period of from forty to one hundred years these lands, cultivated only by occasional ploughing and reseeding, without the addition of any manure except what is dropped by the large herds of cattle which are turned upon them in the fall of the year to crop the luxuriant after-growth, now cut from two to three tons and some four tons to the acre of excellent hay, at a single cutting. These lands are formed at the heads of all the offshoots from the Bay of Fundy, but are not of equal extent nor of equal value. Cornwallis and Horton have about 7000 acres of this soil, some of them the finest quality. which when offered for sale command rising from forty to one hundred dollars per acre.
  Although the country is rapidly improving, yet agriculture, which is the chief occupation of the people, cannot be said to be in a very advanced state. The necessity of a thorough cultivation of the soil or the careful husbanding of manures. the superiority of improved breeds of stock and the economy of introducing and using labor-saving implements are things which, for the most part, are but beeginning to be understood. The chief exports are fat cattle and potatoes. which by raising and exporting to the American markets the farmers have, during the last fifteen years, accumulated much wealth. Wood, butter, cheese. fruit and pork are exported in considerable quantities, The fisheries in Minas Basin and the Bay of Fundy are prosecuted to some extent, but not sufficient to supply the home consumption. We import almost all our flour from the United States and Canada. and our manufactured goods we receive from England and the United States chiefly from the latter. Considerable attention is given to shipbuilding and commerce.
  The early history of the Borden families here is similar to that of most early settlers. Privations were to be endured, obstacles to success and permanent improvement to be overcome, their families to be supported and property accumulated for their children. To accomplish these objects successfully, was the great aim of those who took up their abode here, the men of the first generation. And those of the second generation bear a strong resemblance to them in this respect. The first division of lands, though equitable, was found very inconvenient on actual occupancy, which led to frequent changes by sale and purchase among the proprietors and subsequently. Vie most shrewd and far-seeing, among whom was Perry Borden. taking advantage of this state of things secured for themselves some of the finest lands which in a few years advanced so much that they found themselves possessed of extensive and valuable properties. All the sons of Perry Borden, by the rise in the value of lands thus selected by their father and their own industry became men of independent means, leaving in some cases large properties to their children in whose possession they are chiefly found at the present day. Many of their descendants have changed their locations. The Bordens of the early times considered the mere elements of education amply sufficient for the wants of every-day life, physical power and skill in the various departments of manual labor being more highly prized by them than mere intellectual power.  The Bordens of this period, although several of them were noted in the first respect. do not appear to have been deficient in the latter, on the contrary, they were generally men of sound judgment, good, practicable ability and extensive influence. David and William were induced by their friends to accept nominations for seats in the Provincial Parliament. They were unsuccessful, but not on account of a want of ability. Since that time Andrew Borden of the next generation offered himself as a candidate for the same position, but did not succeed; after which no other person of the name has shown any inclination to win for himself political honors. Indeed the general characteristics of the family were not such as to warrant them in aspiring to such positions. They were men of strict integrity, fearless and independent in thought and action, with qualities of mind more solid than showy, more fond of comfort than fame, and generally with little ability as public speakers; they were better qualified to give weight and influence to a community than to secure honor or distinction too themselves. They have been and still are mostly farmers, although some have turned their attention to other pursuits, almost always with success. Among the younger members many have received and are receiving a liberal education and bid fair to attain distinction for themselves in the various departments to which they have directed their attention. In social life they are to be found in every rank, some occupying high positions in society, while very few have ever brough discredit upon an old, respected and honorable name."."

4FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/67463175/perry-borden. Image.


Emma Amy Percy

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 123, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "She was the daughter of an English officer."


1017. Samuel Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 140, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "When about eighteen months old he was brought to Tiverton, R.I., the residence of his grandsire, Samuel Borden, Esq., and when his parents returned home, Samuel was left in the charge of his grandparent at their urgent solicitation.  This they did out of regard to Mrs. Borden's health, who was of slender constitution, and already far advanced in pregnancy again.  He remained with them several years. until he had acquired the rudiments of knowledge as taught in the country schools at that day. In 1778. when he was 16 years old, and the year in which his grandfather died, Perry Borden sent a request to his father to send his son Samuel to him, as he greatly needed his services. The request was complied with, and Samuel returned to Cornwallis as great a stranger as though he had not been born there. But his own mother he did not find; she had already rested in her grave twelve years and another had taken her place, who had sons of her own who engrossed all the maternal affection she had to bestow. Of course, between his step-mother and him there could be no feeling of sympathy; on the contrary, a kind of dog-war soon commenced, which was evidenced by a long series of low mutterings, growlings, and occasional sharp harkings, until 1783, when Samuel Borden became legally a freeman, and his first act was to assert his independence by returning to Tiverton again, declaring "he would not live in Nova Scotia if the government would give him the whole province." After the death of his grandmother, he came to Fall River and boarded in the family of Simeon Borden. Esq., for several years. Among other enterprises started by them was that of whaling, Seth Russell, late of New Bedford, being one of the concern. After much inquiry. I have not been able to obtain any reliable account of this transaction. They fitted one or two sloops to cruise between Cape Henlopen and Nantucket Shoals, which made several trips in a season with varied success, until Samuel Borden went to Fairhaven and Seth Russell to New Bedford, which broke up the concern, and the remaining partner abandoned the pursuit. The course taken by the two first-named partners afterwards seems to Indicate that the business had been profitable to some extent, as they both enraged 1n it again, though under more favorable circumstances, and followed it during their lives. But the removal of Mr. Borden at that time was occasioned by the death of a young lady to whom he was engaged to be married, Miss Judith Borden, the sister of Simeon Borden. Esq.. his late partner. He afterwards married Elizabeth __, and had two children.  He died in 1850." S."


550. Edward Borden

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=29810175. "Son of Samuel and Peace Mumford Borden.
Husband of Elizabeth Borden." Image.


Elizabeth Borden

1Arnold, James Newell 1844-1927, Rhode Island, Vital Record of 1636-1899: a family register for the people (Providence, R.I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1893), Vol 4 Part VII page 64, FHL US/CAN Book 974.5 V2a. "1-75 Borden Elizabeth, of Samuel (of Joseph) and Mary  Aug. 11, 1762. (also recorded 3-14)."

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=29828897. Image.


551. Benjamin Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 123, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "This Benjamin was distinguished from several others of the came name by the title of Christian Ben. He was a farmer in Tiverton, an honest and industrious man. His son Samuel was an officer in the army of the United States, serving, in the western country till his health became so much impaired that he started for home, but died on the passage down the Mississippi River, and was buried on its banks. Catherine inherited the homestead of her father, and her heirs still retain it. Benjamin Borden was a member of the Friends' Society in Tiverton."

2Carile Santos, Richard Borden of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, pg 1207, FHL 1597740 Item 14. From publication, "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history" published in Buffalo, N.Y. by Harry Ferris Johnston from 1947 to 1959. Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/41865179/benjamin-borden. "Son of SAMUEL AND PEACE MUMFORD BORDEN.
Husband of wife#1 RACHEL COBB BORDEN and wife#2 HEPZIBATH BORDEN." Image.


Rachel Cobb

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/41865249. Image.


1032. Samuel Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], Page 123, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "His son Samuel was an officer in the army of the United States, serving  in the western country till his health became so much impaired that he started for home, but died on the passage down the Mississippi River, and was buried on its banks."

2Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F872-B6Y. "Name: Samuel Borden
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 17 Feb 1780
Event Place: Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Event Place (Original): Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Gender: Male
Father's Name: Benjn. Borden
Mother's Name: Rachel

Other information in the record of Samuel Borden
Name: Samuel Borden
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 17 Feb 1780
Event Place: Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Event Place (Original): Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Gender: Male
Father's Name: Benjn. Borden
Mother's Name: Rachel

Source Reference: Item 1
GS Film Number: 908270
Digital Folder Number: 007831442

Citing this Record
"Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F872-B6B : 17 December 2019), Rachel in entry for Samuel Borden, 1780." Image.


Hiphzibath

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/41865292/hiphzibath-borden. "Wife of BENJAMIN BORDEN." Image.


Phebe Ruth Fox

1Arnold, James Newell 1844-1927, Rhode Island, Vital Record of 1636-1899: a family register for the people (Providence, R.I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1893), bk 4, pg 58, FHL US/CAN Book 974.5 V2a.

2Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. "William Wodell and Phebe Fox married 1761."

3Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.


1036. Huldah Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6.


1037. John Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6.


1040. Isaac Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6.


1041. Phebe Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6.


556. Innocent Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.41, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. 3 children, 7 grandchildren, 6 ggrandchildren, 13 gggrandchildren listed.

2Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F892-MRJ. Image.

3Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F892-MRJ. "Name: Innocent Wodell
Gender: Female
Birth Date: 09 Nov 1736
Birthplace: Rhode Island
Father's Name: Wm. Wodell
Mother's Name: Elizabeth Borden

Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I09358-5
System Origin: Rhode Island-EASy
GS Film number: 913054
Reference ID: v 3 p 85

Citing this Record
"Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F892-MRK : 10 February 2018), Elizabeth Borden in entry for Innocent Wodell, 09 Nov 1736; citing Rhode Island, reference v 3 p 85; FHL microfilm 913,054." Image.

4FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=85796767. "Wife of Samson Sherman
Sister of Ruth
__________
Vital Records of Westport, MA
Gravestone Record."

5FindaGrave.com, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVL9-M8Q7. Image.


Sampson Shearman

1Arnold, James Newell 1844-1927, Rhode Island, Vital Record of 1636-1899: a family register for the people (Providence, R.I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1893), bk 4, pg 58, FHL US/CAN Book 974.5 V2a.

2Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. "Sampson Sherman and Innocent Wodell married 1763." Tiverton Extracts.

3Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.31. "Intention of Marriage Jan 1768."

4Rhode Island Town Marriages Index, 1639-1916, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F8KD-VBQ. Image.

5Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FHNF-FQ9. "Name: Samson Sherman
Event Type: Marriage Notice
Event Date: 22 Jan 1763
Event Place: Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Intention of Marriage
Spouse's Name: Innocent Woddle
Spouse's Gender: Female

GS Film Number: 903382
Digital Folder Number: 004279436
Image Number: 00231

Citing this Record
"Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FHNF-FQ9 : 18 October 2017), Samson Sherman and Innocent Woddle, 22 Jan 1763; citing Marriage Notice, Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States, , town clerk offices, Massachusetts; FHL microfilm 903,382." Image.

6FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85796823. Image.


1042. Job Shearman

1Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F872-X8X. Image.

2FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62882588/job-sherman. Image.


Azubah Crapo

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/62882630. "Wife of Job, age at death 92 years & 24 days." Image.


1044. Susannah Shearman

1Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F87K-QJF. "Name: Susannah Shearman
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 19 Oct 1767
Event Place: Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Event Place (Original): Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Gender: Female
Father's Name: Samson Shearman
Mother's Name: Ruth

Other information in the record of Susannah Shearman
Name: Susannah Shearman
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 19 Oct 1767
Event Place: Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Event Place (Original): Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Gender: Female
Father's Name: Samson Shearman
Mother's Name: Ruth

Source Reference: Item 1
GS Film Number: 908270
Digital Folder Number: 007831442
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C50124-1
System Origin: ODM

Citing this Record
"Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F87K-QJF : 17 December 2019), Samson Shearman in entry for Susannah Shearman, 1767." Image.


557. Ruth Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, pg.42, 43, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. 4 children, 10 grandchildren, 22 ggrandchildren listed.

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSM4-7SSR-V?i=2027&cat=240572, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10. Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85796800/ruth-sherman. Image.


Sampson Shearman

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85796823. Image.


1048. Sampson Sherman Jr.

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/85796837/samson-sherman. Image.


558. Gershom Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, pg.44, 45, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. 8 children, 13 grandchildren, 17 ggrandchildren listed.

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSM4-7SSR-V?i=2027&cat=240572, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10. Image.


Avis Booth

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.30, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. "Gershom Wodell and avis Booth 1769." Tiverton Extracts.

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.


1049. Richard Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.44, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6.


Susannah Sowle

1Arnold, James Newell 1844-1927, Rhode Island, Vital Record of 1636-1899: a family register for the people (Providence, R.I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1893), Batch M501451, Film 0908270, Printout 1002595, FHL US/CAN Book 974.5 V2a.

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.


560. Borden Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, pp.46 - 49, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. 9 children, 30 grandchildren and 87 ggrandchildren listed.

2Arnold, James Newell 1844-1927, Rhode Island, Vital Record of 1636-1899: a family register for the people (Providence, R.I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1893), v 4, pg 43, FHL US/CAN Book 974.5 V2a.

3Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 116, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.


Eunice Davis

1Herbert, Mary Phillips, Massachusetts, Freetown marriage records (Bristol County), 1686-1844, p.63, 974.485/F2 V25h.


1053. George Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.48, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. 7 children, 15 grandchildren listed.


Hulda Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.55, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6.


1057. Charles Wordell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.49, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. "died a young man of injuries received in a scuffle."


1058. Nathan Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.49, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. "a sailor, never married."


1059. Mahala Wodell

1Eli Wodell, Wodell Family, Genealogy of a part of the, from 1640 to 1880, p.49, FHL Film 1020783 Item 6. "An idiot."


Rebecca Russell

1New England Historic Genealogical Society, Massachusetts, Dartmouth, Vital records of, to the year 1850, Boston : New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1929-1930, p.564, FHL 974.485/D1 V28v  v.2.


565. Samuel Asa Borden

1Carile Santos, Borden, Richard of Portsmouth, R.I., "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history"; 1635-1838; Buffalo NY by Harry Ferris Johnston 1947-, Family History Library Film 1597740 Item 14. "Source lists 9 children & 8 g-children. RESIDENCES: Scituate, Mass. Samuel was a physician at Gloucester, Rhode Island. Also lived in Providence. After the death of his father he removed to Canada, near Quebec."

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 123, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "253. SAMUEL ASA, born July 12, 173S. He was a physician at Gloucester, R. I., also lived at Providence, where he married the daughter of Ezekiel Hopkins. After the death of his father he removed to Quebec, Canada. His son Samuel continued to live there, and raised a numerous family."


568. Gail Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], p.123, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "256. GAIL, born September 9, 1745: died 1777, in Gloucester, R. I. His wife was Mary Knowlton, daughter of Thomas Knowltbn and Lydia Ballard, who was a direct descendant of Gabriel Bernon, and his wife Esther LeRoy. Gabriel Bernon was born in 1644, died 1736. He came to America from Rochelle, France, during the Huguenot persecution. He was a merchant at Rochelle, and early in life engaged in commercial enterprises in Canada, in which he acquired great wealth. He was thrown into prison in Amsterdam for the crime of Protestantism. He fled on his release from prison to London, from thence to Boston in 1688. From which place he removed to Providence. Several interesting memorials of his are still preserved, as carved chairs, a gold rattle, a, sword (with date 1414), a psalm book, etc. He was buried
beneath St. John's Church, Providence, and a great bronze tablet was placed there to his memory. The wife of Gail, Mary Knowlton, after his death, married Ezekiel P!opkins of Providence, and had two daughters, Elizabeth and Amy Hopkins."

2Carile Santos, Borden, Richard of Portsmouth, R.I., "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history"; 1635-1838; Buffalo NY by Harry Ferris Johnston 1947-, Family History Library Film 1597740 Item 14.  lists 2 daughters & 7 g-children & 1 gg-child.


Susannah Thomas

1Arnold, James Newell 1844-1927, Rhode Island, Vital Record of 1636-1899: a family register for the people (Providence, R.I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1893), Page 6:2:92, FHL US/CAN Book 974.5 V2a.