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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Col William Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, pg 21, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "     He made his home on a tract of land known as the "Old Plantation" or the "Old House Tract", which contained 1000 acres. This tract was purchased by him and was not inherited. It lay on the bank of the Rappahannock River above the Naylors Hole tract, and was separated from it be a small creek called Doctor's creek. He also purchased the Naylor's Hole tract between Doctor's Creek and Rappahannock Creek, but he never live there.  When he died he left both of these tracts to his eldest son, William. Besides these lands he owned 1000 acres near Farnham Church called "Quintenoak" which he inherited from his grandfather Col. Samuel Griffin.
    William Fauntleroy appears frequently in the early records. He was a member of the House of Burgesses from Richmond County in 1736, 1740, 1742, 1744-1749."

2Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, pg 22. "     From the records of Richmond County we learn that on July 3, 1723 he was appointed to keep ferry.... "over the mouth of Rapphannock Creek  to the land of Mrs. Katherine Gwyn". On October 7, 1724, James  Scott came into court and "obliged himself to serve Mr. William Fauntleroy or his assigns for five years from the date hereof in consideration that the said William Fantleroy pay all his debts and give him at the expiration of his servitude one Kersey Coat, Vest, and Breches".  William Fauntleroy seems to have been a strong believer in slavery, was very active in acquiring slaves and in catching runaways and in his will recorded in Richmond County in 1757 he left money to be "laid out in young Negro girls" for the benefit of his heirs.
    From Richmond County records, Order Book 9, page 199, we learn that on Feb. 4, 1724  William Fauntleroy brought suit against Thomas Boyd, master of the ship "Prince Royal", for slander.  Boyd had publically accused him of receiving and concealing some sails and other materials which had been stolen from his ship. William  Fauntleroy was awarded £ 5 damages.
    In the same records, Order Book 9, page 465, is recorded that on Apr. 2, 1729 William Fauntleroy brought suit against John Watkinson, master of the ship "Vine", for failure to carry out instructions in disposing of a shipment of tobacco at Liverpool, England. In  this case he was awarded 11 shillings damages."

3Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 4, 11. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "William and Katherine (Griffin) Fauntleroy had issue: 1. Moore (e) of Richmond county, died 1739; married Margaret, daughter of Paul Micou, of "Port Micou," Essex; 2. Griffin, of Northumberland, vestryman of St. Stephen's parish 1714 &e - acoording to one account he married Miss Tayloe; 3. Colonel William (f) of "Naylor's Hole," Richmond county, born 1684, died 1757, was member of the House of Burgesses from Richmond county 1736, 1744, 1748, &c; married Apphia, daughter of John Bushrod (f2) of Westmoreland county.

(f)  His will is dated October 26, 1757, and recorded in Richmond county December 5, 1757. Gives certain lands to his son William, gives certain lands to his son Moore, also certain lands given the testator by his grandfather Griffin, with Provision that Moore gives his (Moore's) son, George Hale Fauntleroy, all the lands that were his mother's, gives to son John land in Essex county, to three sons, William, Moore and John, all his land in Caroline county, to his daughter Sarah Gray and children, certain negroes, (underlining in pencil, as also all the markings in the margins by the same Sarah Jameson (Yeiser) Borden. Copyist's note.) to daughter Hannah Robinson a negro and £50, to daughter Apphia Daingerfield £50, to daughter Katherlne Lewis £50, to daughter Mary Brooke £50, to daughter Ann Pettett a negro, to his grandson Henry Robinson £200, to his grandchildren Mary, Martha, Lucy and LeRoy Daingerfield certain negroes, appoints his kinsman John Tayloe and his sons William, Moore, and John his executors."

4Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, pg 5. "Colonel William and Apphia (Bushrod) Fauntleroy, had issue: 1. Colonel William (i) of Naylor's Hole" Richmond county, born 1713, died 1793, married first, 1735, Elizabeth ----(and had Elizabeth, born June 26, 1736 (j) married Mr. Adams, of James River); secondly, Peggy, daughter of Jeremiah Murdock (J1); 2. Moore (k) of Richmond county, born 1716, died 1791 married first ---- Hale, secondly ---- Mitchell; 3. John, born 1724, never married; 4. Hannah, married Maxmilian Robinson of King George county; 5. Apphia, married Colonel William Dangerfield of "Greenfield" Essex; 6. Katherine, married ---- Lewis; 7. Mary, married ---- Brooke; 8. Anne, married --- Pettit; 9. Sarah,  married ----- Gray."


Col William Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, pg 18, 19, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "due to his early death his name does not appear as frequently in the early records as that of his father, but we know that he was taken to London about 1674 by his stepfather, Col. William Lloyd, and that his mother went with them. There Col. Lloyd had him bound out as apprentice to James Lowry, a factor, and later to Charles Seddon, a pewterer. The reason for this move is obscure, however, after Col. Lloyd had returned to Virginia William Fauntleroy evidently quarreled with Seddon, as it is recorded that Seddon put him out of the house and refused to allow him, to return also refused to let William Fauntleroy  have his books and other personal property. Shortly after this William Fauntleroy returned to Virginia, where he married Katherine Griffin in 1678.
    In addition to the lands he inherited from his father, William Fauntleroy also received 4054 acres from Col. William Peirce, and 1155 acres which was given to Katherine Griffin by Ambrose Clare, perhaps her uncle or grandfather. Between 1678 and 1686 he sold 7000 acres of land, including a tract of 1200 acres to Col. William Lloyd. This tract was a part of the Mangorite grant patented by his father, and was in the possession of his mother when she married Col. Lloyd. It was on Bushwood Creek, and contained "the stone house field" before  mentioned, and was probably the last home of Col. Moore Fauntleroy.
    William Fauntleroy retained the part of the Mangorite Grant called Crondall and the Island, about 1200 acres, and probably lived there. When he died without a will, this passed to his eldest son Moore, who lived there for many years.
    William Fauntleroy was a Justice in Old Rappahannock County from 1684 to 1686."

2Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 4. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "William and Katherine (Griffin) Fauntleroy had issue: 1. Moore (e) of Richmond county, died 1739; married Margaret, daughter of Paul Micou, of "Port Micou," Essex; 2. Griffin, of Northumberland, vestryman of St. Stephen's parish 1714 &e - according to one account he married Miss Tayloe; 3. Colonel William (f) of "Naylor's Hole," Richmond county, born 1684, died 1757, was member of the House of Burgesses from Richmond county 1736, 1744, 1748, &c; married Apphia, daughter of John Bushrod (f2) of Westmoreland county."


Katharine Griffin

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 19, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "Her portrait hangs at Mt. Airy, and photographs of it are in this book. The dates of birth of Katherine Griffin and her sons are given on an old record sheet now in the possession of the Misses Tayloe of Mt. Airy."


Col. John Bushrod

1Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pgs 4, 11, 12. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "William and Katherine (Griffin) Fauntleroy had issue: 1. Moore (e) of Richmond county, died 1739; married Margaret, daughter of Paul Micou, of "Port Micou," Essex; 2. Griffin, of Northumberland, vestryman of St. Stephen's parish 1714 &e - acoording to one account he married Miss Tayloe; 3. Colonel William (f) of "Naylor's Hole," Richmond county, born 1684, died 1757, was member of the House of Burgesses from Richmond county 1736, 1744, 1748, &c; married Apphia, daughter of John Bushrod (f2) of Westmoreland county.

(f2)  About the middle of the seventeenth century two brothers (as the York records show) named Bushrod, were living on or near York river, in Virginia.   The elder Colonel Thomas Bushrod, born 1604 was of York county in 1651. In 1657 is entitled, in a power-of-attorney from English merchants "of Essex Lodge on York River;" was burgess for the county in 1659. In or before l66l he married the widow of Captain Thomas Hi11. His widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Bushrod, died in 1679 and in her will, proved in York in that year, names her daughters Lydia, wife of Thomas Harwood, and Elizabeth, wife of Colonel John Scarsbrook. Which of her marriages they were the issue of is not known.
    Richard Bushrod, of Gloucester county, was born 1627, and married Apphia ___. In 1662 he had a grant of 2000 acres on the Potomac in ^Westmoreland. He had issue: 1. John, of Westmoreland county, born in Gloucester January 30, 1663, died February 6, 1719 (epitaph in Meade); had in 1710 a grant of land in Westmoreland, adjoining his own land and that of his deceased brother Thomas;  married Hannah, daughter of William Keene, of Northumberland county; 2. Thomas. There is at Richmond Court house a bond dated 1709 from Griffin and Moore Fauntleroy, executors of Thomas Bushrod, of "Beautrey" Northumberland, to John Bushrod of Westmoreland, Gentleman, which states that the said Thomas Bushrod made his will September 1, 1697 and left issue a son Richard, and a daughter Anne, who had "lately" married John Bushrod. A Richard Bushrod was a captain in the Virginia forces in the expedition under Admiral Vernon in 1740 (Council Journal).
    John and Hannah (Keene) Bushrod had issue; 1. John, of Westmoreland, married, about 1709, Anne, daughter of Thomas Bushrod; 2. Son; 3. Apphia, married about 1712 William Fauntleroy; 4, Daughter; 5. Daughter; 6. Daughter.
    The last named John Bushrod was probably father of Colonel John Bushrod, who was burgess for Westmoreland 1748, 1753, 1754, 1755 (and probably other years) married Jenny, daughter of Colonel
Gawin Corbin, and was father of Hannah Bushrod who married John A. Washington, brother of the President.
    A Richard Bushrode had a license in 1623 to make a voyage of discovery and trade from England to New England."

2The Generations Network, Inc., 2004, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, 23950.003. "Name: Hannah Keene
Gender: female
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1676
Spouse Name: John Bushrod
Spouse Birth Place: VA
Spouse Birth Year: 1663
Number Pages: 3."


Hannah Keene

1The Generations Network, Inc., 2004, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, 23950.003. "Name: Hannah Keene
Gender: female
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1676
Spouse Name: John Bushrod
Spouse Birth Place: VA
Spouse Birth Year: 1663
Number Pages: 3."


Col. William Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 25, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "He inherited the "Old Plantation" tract and the "Naylors Hole" tract from his father in 1757. The Naylors Hole tract was between Rappahannock (now Cat Point) Creek and Doctors Creek. Here he built a square brick house in the Georgian style and was the first of the name to live at Naylors Hole.  This place is the best known of all the Fauntleroy places, and a picture of the house and more detailed information about it is given elsewhere in this book. It has often been referred to as the place where Col. Moore Fauntleroy first settled, and as the original home of the family in Virginia. However, the researches of Miss Juliet Fauntleroy of Altavista, Va. prove conclusively by patents, deeds, and wills, that the following are the true facts:  That Col. Moore Fauntleroy was the first white man to own it, as it was included in his patent of 450 acres on Swan Creek dated May 22, 1650, but which was relinquished by him in order that he could use the headrights to make good on another patent. That the next Fauntleroy to own it was William, who bought it from the heirs of Robert Hopkins and John Ford. That the first Fauntleroy to make  his home there was Col. William Fauntleroy (the son of William and Apphia Bushrod Fauntleroy).
The house at Naylors Hole is gone, but in 1927 Col. Powell C. Fauntleroy, U. S. Army, a descendant, erected a monument built of some of the old bricks placing it upon the site of the house. This monument contained a bronze plaque on which was inscribed a good deal of information about Col. Moore Fauntleroy, the pioneer settler. Photographs of it may be seen in several historical publications. In 1950 the place changed hands, and the monument was torn down and the large bronze plaque was sold for the value of the metal, an act of vandalism.
Col. William Fauntleroy was a Justice from 1737 to 1750, captain of Virginia Militia 1739 major in 1748, colonel 1751, member of House of Burgesses 1742 to 1750. In 1741 he was appointed to keep a ferry across the mouth of Rappahannock Creek, and he operated it for many years. In 1787-88 he was granted a license as a retail merchant. His will was proved in  Richmond  County Dec. 3, 1793. By it his son Robert Fauntleroy inherited Naylors Hole."

2Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 13. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "(i) His will was proved in Richmond county December 3, 1793, speaks of what he has formerly given his sons and confirms the gifts to son Moore "Old Plantation" 1000 acres for life, slaves and other personal property; to John, slaves and other personal estate, and "Old Plantation" after Moore's death; to son Griffin M. slaves &e., and land adjoining Cat Point warehouse; to Joseph slaves, &c.; to Robert personal property, and the land called "Naylor's Hole"; to his daughters and grandchildren various legacies."

3Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, pg 6. "Colonel William and Peggy (Murdock) Fauntleroy had issue: 1. Apphia born December 21, 1737, married Captain John Champe Carter, of Amherst county; 2. Dr. Moore (l) born November 1, 1743, studied at Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and the Temple and 'Lived in Essex; died unmarried in Charleston, South Carolina, 1802; 3. William born September 5, 1742, also studied abroad with his brother and died soon after his return about 1775; 4. John (l2) of Richmond county, born August 3, 1745, died 1798; member of the House of Delegates from hichmond county 1784, married Judith, daughter of Colonel James Ball, of "Bewdley" Lancaster; 5. Griffin Murdock, of "Mars Hill," Richmond county, born June 1, 1747, died 1794, married Anne, daughter of John Belfield of Richmond county; 6. Jane, born August 15, 1749, married Colonel Thomas Turner of "Smith's Mount"; 7. Molly born May 1, 1751; 8. Sally, married ---- Turner; 9. Joseph, born May 30th, 1754, married Elizabeth, daughter of Bushrod Fauntleroy and removed to "Greenville" Frederick county, now Clarke; 10. Henry (li) born June 28, 1756, captain in the Revolution and a very gallant and chivalrous officer, killed in the battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1777; 11. Robert, born 1858, married Sarah, daughter of Colonel James Ball of "Bewdley" and died October 29, 1832."


Col. William Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 25, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "He inherited the "Old Plantation" tract and the "Naylors Hole" tract from his father in 1757. The Naylors Hole tract was between Rappahannock (now Cat Point) Creek and Doctors Creek. Here he built a square brick house in the Georgian style and was the first of the name to live at Naylors Hole.  This place is the best known of all the Fauntleroy places, and a picture of the house and more detailed information about it is given elsewhere in this book. It has often been referred to as the place where Col. Moore Fauntleroy first settled, and as the original home of the family in Virginia. However, the researches of Miss Juliet Fauntleroy of Altavista, Va. prove conclusively by patents, deeds, and wills, that the following are the true facts:  That Col. Moore Fauntleroy was the first white man to own it, as it was included in his patent of 450 acres on Swan Creek dated May 22, 1650, but which was relinquished by him in order that he could use the headrights to make good on another patent. That the next Fauntleroy to own it was William, who bought it from the heirs of Robert Hopkins and John Ford. That the first Fauntleroy to make  his home there was Col. William Fauntleroy (the son of William and Apphia Bushrod Fauntleroy).
The house at Naylors Hole is gone, but in 1927 Col. Powell C. Fauntleroy, U. S. Army, a descendant, erected a monument built of some of the old bricks placing it upon the site of the house. This monument contained a bronze plaque on which was inscribed a good deal of information about Col. Moore Fauntleroy, the pioneer settler. Photographs of it may be seen in several historical publications. In 1950 the place changed hands, and the monument was torn down and the large bronze plaque was sold for the value of the metal, an act of vandalism.
Col. William Fauntleroy was a Justice from 1737 to 1750, captain of Virginia Militia 1739 major in 1748, colonel 1751, member of House of Burgesses 1742 to 1750. In 1741 he was appointed to keep a ferry across the mouth of Rappahannock Creek, and he operated it for many years. In 1787-88 he was granted a license as a retail merchant. His will was proved in  Richmond  County Dec. 3, 1793. By it his son Robert Fauntleroy inherited Naylors Hole."

2Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 13. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "(i) His will was proved in Richmond county December 3, 1793, speaks of what he has formerly given his sons and confirms the gifts to son Moore "Old Plantation" 1000 acres for life, slaves and other personal property; to John, slaves and other personal estate, and "Old Plantation" after Moore's death; to son Griffin M. slaves &e., and land adjoining Cat Point warehouse; to Joseph slaves, &c.; to Robert personal property, and the land called "Naylor's Hole"; to his daughters and grandchildren various legacies."

3Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, pg 6. "Colonel William and Peggy (Murdock) Fauntleroy had issue: 1. Apphia born December 21, 1737, married Captain John Champe Carter, of Amherst county; 2. Dr. Moore (l) born November 1, 1743, studied at Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and the Temple and 'Lived in Essex; died unmarried in Charleston, South Carolina, 1802; 3. William born September 5, 1742, also studied abroad with his brother and died soon after his return about 1775; 4. John (l2) of Richmond county, born August 3, 1745, died 1798; member of the House of Delegates from hichmond county 1784, married Judith, daughter of Colonel James Ball, of "Bewdley" Lancaster; 5. Griffin Murdock, of "Mars Hill," Richmond county, born June 1, 1747, died 1794, married Anne, daughter of John Belfield of Richmond county; 6. Jane, born August 15, 1749, married Colonel Thomas Turner of "Smith's Mount"; 7. Molly born May 1, 1751; 8. Sally, married ---- Turner; 9. Joseph, born May 30th, 1754, married Elizabeth, daughter of Bushrod Fauntleroy and removed to "Greenville" Frederick county, now Clarke; 10. Henry (li) born June 28, 1756, captain in the Revolution and a very gallant and chivalrous officer, killed in the battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1777; 11. Robert, born 1858, married Sarah, daughter of Colonel James Ball of "Bewdley" and died October 29, 1832."


Dr. William Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, pg 25, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "Studied abroad in Scotland with his brother Moore & died unmarried soon after returning."

2Lewis Hampton Jones, Jones, Captain Roger of London and Virginia, Louisville, Ky.: L.H. Jones, 1911. 442 p, pg 171, FHL 1321070. "Dr. William Fauntleroy, who was educated in Europe; was a medial student in Edinburg and Aberdeen for fourteen years, and died soon after his return to Virginia."


Dr. Moore Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 29, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "He studied medicine at Aberdeen and Edinburgh Scotland. After he returned to Virginia he lived at Tappahannock, at Naylors Hole, and in Westmoreland County.  He did not believe in slavery, and freed some of his slaves during his lifetime and the rest of them by will at death. He was very fond of his youngest brother Robert, who like himself was opposed to slavery. In one place in his will, which was dated Dec. 15, 1801, we find "I give and bequeath to the blind free Negro Billy Lewis 40 shillings per annum during his life". At another place he leaves his "coat of arms china" to his nephew, Henry S. Turner. He  inherited a life interest in the "Old Plantation" adjoining Naylors Hole, and upon his death it passed to his brother John Fauntleroy. His will was recorded in Richmond County Apr. 5, 1803."

2Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 14. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "(l) His will is dated December 15,1801 and recorded in Richmond county, April 5, 1803. Among other legacies he leaves his "coat of arms china"to his nephew Henry S. Turner."


Molly Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, pg 26, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "Died unmarried."


Capt. Moore Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 26, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "     His will is on record in Richmond County, and an inventory of his estate shows 107 slaves. He acquired by inheritance and purchase 1698 acres of land near Farnham Church and on the Rappahannock River opposite Carter's Wharf, and his house at the latter place was called "The Cliffs". He was commissioned a captain in the Virginia Militia in 1741, and was probably  the Moore Fauntleroy who signed the Leedstown Resolutions at Leedstown on Feb. 27, 1766. This document, the first protest of its kind against the Stamp Act, was written by Richard Henry Lee and was signed by 115 patriots of the Northern Neck. A marble plaque containing its full text and the names of all the signers is at the Courthouse at Montrose, Va."

2Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 7. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "Moore Fauntleroy (who died 1791) had issue by his first marriage with Hale; l. George Hale, married Sarah -----, and died before his father. Moore Fauntleroy had by his second marriage with ---- Metcalf: 2. William of Richmond county, born 1757, married ---- and had no issue. (His widow married --- Bernard, near Fredericksburg); 3. Samuel Griffin, of "The Cliffs"
Richmond county, and "Ring's Neck," King and Queen; appointed justice of King and Queen 1794, married first ---Todd, secondly --- Lowrey; 4. Ellen, married ---- (probably William) Sydnor; 5. "usannah, married Robert Tomlin; Catherine married ----- Marshall; 7. Apphia died young; 8. Henry, died young."


Capt. Moore Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 26, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "     His will is on record in Richmond County, and an inventory of his estate shows 107 slaves. He acquired by inheritance and purchase 1698 acres of land near Farnham Church and on the Rappahannock River opposite Carter's Wharf, and his house at the latter place was called "The Cliffs". He was commissioned a captain in the Virginia Militia in 1741, and was probably  the Moore Fauntleroy who signed the Leedstown Resolutions at Leedstown on Feb. 27, 1766. This document, the first protest of its kind against the Stamp Act, was written by Richard Henry Lee and was signed by 115 patriots of the Northern Neck. A marble plaque containing its full text and the names of all the signers is at the Courthouse at Montrose, Va."

2Virginia Historical Magazine, The. Vol 1. Number 1. July 1891, Jefferson Wallace, Richmond, Virginia, pg 7. Copied by Sarah Yeiser Mason Heerman. "Moore Fauntleroy (who died 1791) had issue by his first marriage with Hale; l. George Hale, married Sarah -----, and died before his father. Moore Fauntleroy had by his second marriage with ---- Metcalf: 2. William of Richmond county, born 1757, married ---- and had no issue. (His widow married --- Bernard, near Fredericksburg); 3. Samuel Griffin, of "The Cliffs"
Richmond county, and "Ring's Neck," King and Queen; appointed justice of King and Queen 1794, married first ---Todd, secondly --- Lowrey; 4. Ellen, married ---- (probably William) Sydnor; 5. "usannah, married Robert Tomlin; Catherine married ----- Marshall; 7. Apphia died young; 8. Henry, died young."


John B. Fauntleroy

1Robert H. Fauntleroy, Fauntleroy Family, The, Microfilm published: Washington, 1952, P 27, FHL 1318331 Item 3. "He inherited 1500 acres of land in Essex County on Hoskins Creek which his father had bought from the heirs of Francis Meriwether, and on some part of this he probably made his home.
    From the records of Essex County, we have the following, dated 1761, Quote:
James, a negro slave belonging to John Fauntleroy Gent. was brought before the court by the warrant of John Rowzee Gent. on suspicion of his stealing a hog the property of John Lee Esq. On hearing the Testimony of severall Witnesses and the prisoner in his own defense, It is ordered that the Sherif give the said James at the Publick whiping Post thirty lashes on his bare back well laid on, and then deliver him to a constable to be conveyed to his master according to Law."