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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Capt Robert Wear

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84426096. Image.


Lucretia Thomas

1Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953, Mason, T. "Letter to Mrs. Charles Adams of Dallas, Texas:
The daughter of Isaac Thomas called Lucretia Wear was the wife of Robert Wear; he was the son of Colonel Samuel Wear, this County's most prominent Political and military leader during the early days. Robert Wear himself became well known as Surveyor General of the District South of French Broad and Holston, which included Sevier County. He obtained this job from the General Assembly of Tennessee in 1806 and the first Tennessee land grants in this part of the State were surveyed by him or under his supervision. He lived on land, probably Thomas land, near Sevierville, and owned land of his own in the vicinity of Sevierville. Later he and his family moved to the adjoining County of Blount. I know nothing about his family or descendants."

2C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p 27, 21 Aug 1953, FHC 921.73 T363w. Children listed.

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84426131. Image.


Jonathan Eppler

1Sue Clark, Arkansas, Fort Smith & Van Buren, Death and Marriage Announcements 1844-1886, 1998, p.6. "Eppler, Jonathan died at his residence in this county on Tuesday the --inst, aged about 60 yrs.  Van Buren Arkansas Intelligencer April 11, 1846."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953, Mason, T. "Letter to Mrs. Charles Adamss of Dallas, Texas:
The daughter called "Else Eppler" (Eppes) was Else Thomas, who married Jonathan Eppler (Eppes). The date and place of their marriage is unknown to me. Can you provide any information on this? They left this county at an early date; a descendant, Mrs. Margaret C. Boyce, 1705 Polk Street, Amarillo, Texas, stated in a letter written in 1926, that "Jonathan Epples and Else Thomas lived at Frankfort, Kentucky, about 1812," and that they "later migrated to Missouri where he bought land in Carroll County in 1821." Then, Mrs. Boyce continued: "His son, John and other children moved to Arkansas many years before the Civil War. John Epples was county judge for many years in Scott County, and his son, Harmon Rufus Epples, was my mother's father." The Will of Isaac Thomas, which I have enclosed, was preserved by this Eppler (Eppes) family. It seems that Milles Epples, youngest son of Jonathan and Else came to Texas, and that some time before 1926, Leonard Epples of Cisco, Texas, a grandson of Milles Epples, found a copy of Isaac Thomas' Will among the papers of his grandfather, Milles Epples, apparently this copy had been obtained from the Sevier County court clerk in 1854 by some member of the Epples family probably Milles Epples; this was fortunate because the Sevier County courthouse with all early court records burned two years later in 1856. It is my understanding that Mr. Leonard Epples still lives at Cisco, Texas; I have written him for information, but his age, past eighty, may prevent him from answering. However, another correspondent in Abilene, Texas, Miss Tommie H. Clack has promised to interview Mr. Epples. Other important papers besides the Will may be in possession of the Eppler family."


Ailsey Thomas

1Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953, Mason, T. "Letter to Mrs. Charles Adamss of Dallas, Texas:
The daughter called "Else Eppler" (Eppes) was Else Thomas, who married Jonathan Eppler (Eppes). The date and place of their marriage is unknown to me. Can you provide any information on this? They left this county at an early date; a descendant, Mrs. Margaret C. Boyce, 1705 Polk Street, Amarillo, Texas, stated in a letter written in 1926, that "Jonathan Epples and Else Thomas lived at Frankfort, Kentucky, about 1812," and that they "later migrated to Missouri where he bought land in Carroll County in 1821." Then, Mrs. Boyce continued: "His son, John and other children moved to Arkansas many years before the Civil War. John Epples was county judge for many years in Scott County, and his son, Harmon Rufus Epples, was my mother's father." The Will of Isaac Thomas, which I have enclosed, was preserved by this Eppler (Eppes) family. It seems that Milles Epples, youngest son of Jonathan and Else came to Texas, and that some time before 1926, Leonard Epples of Cisco, Texas, a grandson of Milles Epples, found a copy of Isaac Thomas' Will among the papers of his grandfather, Milles Epples, apparently this copy had been obtained from the Sevier County court clerk in 1854 by some member of the Epples family probably Milles Epples; this was fortunate because the Sevier County courthouse with all early court records burned two years later in 1856. It is my understanding that Mr. Leonard Epples still lives at Cisco, Texas; I have written him for information, but his age, past eighty, may prevent him from answering. However, another correspondent in Abilene, Texas, Miss Tommie H. Clack has promised to interview Mr. Epples. Other important papers besides the Will may be in possession of the Eppler family."


Jonathan Eppler

1Sue Clark, Arkansas, Fort Smith & Van Buren, Death and Marriage Announcements 1844-1886, 1998, p.6. "Eppler, Jonathan died at his residence in this county on Tuesday the --inst, aged about 60 yrs.  Van Buren Arkansas Intelligencer April 11, 1846."


General Isaac Thomas Jr.

1C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p.26, FHC 921.73 T363w. "In the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927, the following on ISAAC THOMAS, JR.: "A representative from Tennessee, born in Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784; after the death of his parents, he moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1800; self-educated; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Winchester; elected as a Democrat to the fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817; moved to Alexandria, Rapids Parish, Louisiana, in 1819 resumed the practice of law; purchased vast tracts of land adjoining Alexandria and became one of the largest landowners and slave holders in Louisiana; was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of sawmills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate in 1823-1827; moved to California in 1848; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died on February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapids Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana."

Since Isaac Thomas, Sr., died in 1818, Isaac Thomas, Jr. must have moved to Winchester after this date.  He was still in Sevierville in 1809 because he signed a petition to the Tennessee Legislature in that year, and he was in Sevierville in 1810, because he became Curcuit Court Clerk in the latter part of that year. In any event, it is not likely he would have left in 1800, because he was only 16 years old at that time."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 17 Oct 1961, Mason, T. "Letter to Mr. William Thomas of Athens, Tenn:
It was Judge Samuel C. Williams who made the statement I believe in his "Lost State of Franklin, "that Congressman Isaac Thomas was either a son or nephew of old Isaac, but of course Judge Williams had made no special study of this problem. I think you are putting too much faith in the Congressional Directory sketch of Congressman Isaac. To begin with this book was published in 1927 or 1928, so Congressman Isaac could not have given this information. Also, the sketch is in error when it states that he left Sevierville and settled at Winchester in 1800. There was no Winchester, Tennessee in 1800 -- this town was founded until 1812 and Franklin County was not established until 1807. In fact I am not sure that he ever lived in Winchester. His residence when he served in Congress was given as Sparta, county seat of White County. The last record I have of him here is 1810 when he became circuit court clerk. His bond in the State Archives was signed by old Isaac who made his mark, indicating either illiteracy or physical incapacity. He served in a War of 1812 outfit in Middle Tennessee, but he got the title "General" in Louisiana where he was brigadier general of the Louisiana militia.

I have located a large number of letters in the National Archives, some written by him and some by others about him, asking for his appointment as federal judge and ambassador to some country. Also, the Louisiana Archives has many letters regarding our General Thomas. I intend to get microfilm copies of those letters as soon as possible. I am hopeful that these letters will reveal still more about him.

The value of the two old letters I have cited as source material comes from the fact that both letters are contemporary with the period when General Isaac Thomas lived, and not based on tradition.

I have tried to run down the date (1784) given in the Directory as the date of his birth --the exact date given was Nov. 4, 1764. Old Isaac had one daughter Lucretia, who married Robert Wear -- they settled in Blount County, now Loudon County, and lived on the Little Tennessee River near the present Greenpack -- the farm is still in the Wear family. This Wear family was neighbors of the Douthitts. In the old family cemetery on this Wear farm there is a marker to Lucretia's grave which gives the date of her birth as Aug. (?) 1784. She may have been a twin to Isaac, Jr. General Thomas' was buried at Pineville on the lot of his second wife's family, but apparently his grave is unmarked. I have had two persons look for his marker, but neighbor one found any marker. Polly Ann (Timothy) Douthitt was born in 1782, according to family records and to the marker at her grave, so old Isaac must have married Elizabeth, (Massengill) Timothy about the year 1783. Right now I feel that Isaac Jr. and Lucretia were twins and it be my guess that the date on her rock and in the Douthitt Bible would be the correct birth date, rather than the one in the Directory."

3Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas, Texas:
... it is my belief that he was the oldest son.  Apparently he became a lawyer before leaving Sevier County, and was appointed circuit court clerk of Sevier County in 1810; he received his appointment from the governor of Tennessee. Also, I have his name on a petition to the Tennessee legislature, filed from Sevierville in 1809, and in 1808 he was granted a commission as captain of a Sevier County malitia company. Apparently he left Sevier County before his father's death in 1818 because he served in a Middle Tennessee company during the War of 1812.  He became lieutenant of this company and was appointed adjutant of the entire regiment, of which his company was a part. Then he was elected to Congress from a Middle Tennessee district in 1814, and served from 1815 to 1817. During this period his time seems to have been at Winchester, Williamson Co., Tennessee, where he was first married to a Miss Pryor. About 1819 Isaac Thomas Jr. moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, and a daughter, Adelia Elizabeth Thomas, was born here, Jan. 13, 1821 the latter was married twice and her first husband was Ebenezer Flint; they had five daughters, only one of which lived to marry and she left no heirs. Another daughter, Annie, Thomas, married William Ennemond Menillon Wells. Isaac Thomas married a second time and his second wife's name was Emerline Flint; they had no children, and there are no living descendants of this Thomas. He may have married the third time, but I have no data on his supposed third marriage.

Isaac Thomas Jr. practiced Law in Louisiana and became a large land owner in the Alexandria region and a sugar planter; it is said that he was a very wealthy man when he died in 1859. It seems that the Flint family, his second wife's people inherited his large estate. That he was a prominent man in the Louisiana is shown by the following statement from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927: "was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of saw mills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate, 1823-1827; moved to California in 1849; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana.."

In the congressional Directory quoted above it also stated that Isaac Thomas Jr. was born in "Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784," but I have found a conflict with this date; when he filed for bounty land which his service as a soldier in the War of 1812 entitled him to, he made application from New Orleans, 5 April 1851, and stated that he was 59 years old at that time. This would make the date of his birth, 1792, rather than 1784. I am at a loss to explain this discrepancy. I would like to know the source of the date, 1784, given in the Directory; this must be the correct date, because if he was born in 1792 he would have been too young to serve in Congress in 1815. Does the Bible Record in your possession have the date of the births of John Thomas' brothers and sisters?

Represented Maury County, Tennessee, in the legislature of 1825-27. He was sent as minister to England. The silver watch he sent nephew Isaac Thomas Douthitt is still possessed by descendants. Later he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas. A letter in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth Douthitt Ghermly or Ghormly, Lenior City Tennessee, was written by her grandfather, Isaac Thomas Douthitt while on his way to Mexican border, and he stated that he passed within 90 miles of the home of his uncle Isaac Thomas but did not have time to visit him. Another document shows that Isaac Thomas advanced money to her grandfather who was sick in the Mexican War. The records of the War of 1812 show that Isaac Thomas and son Isaac Jr. had active service in this war."

4National Archives, Sharp, J.A. - research (microfilm), 21 Aug 1953, McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. "NATIONAL ARCHIVES -- Microfilm Copies, Correspondence regarding appointment of General Isaac Thomas to U.S. Consulship at Havana, Cuba, 1841, and appointment to Federal Judgeship in California, 1850. This Microfilm strip was given to McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee.

New Orleans, Jany 10, 1841 -- Gen. Isaac Thomas to Pres. Wm. H. Harrison - Dear Sir- Presuming on slight acquaintance we formed when members of Congress - "(you from Ohio and me from Tennessee) in Sessions 15, 16 & 17 and acquaintance and friendship between you and Mr. Flint my wife's father." Altho my general health has been and now good- have been for several years afflicted "with Rheumatism." My medical friends advise a residence of a few years in Cuba as likely means restoring me. Would like appointment as consul in Havana if office becomes vacant - feels he could discharge office with "credit to my country."
Your obt Servt
I Thomas

A W. Roman(Governor) to Hon E.D. White- New Orleans, Feb. 15, 1841 - Gen Isaac Thomas informs me he is applicant consul at Havana. "The great commercial intercourse between this City and the Island of Cuba" makes it important to interests of Louisiana that someone acquainted with those interests be appointed. Gen. Thomas- "his character and his services" qualify him. You know he is fully competent.

R. Gant land of Sanland (?) of Louisiana to Pres. Harrison - Washington - March 6, l840 ? (1841) ? - Enclosed is letter recommending General Isaac Thomas of Parish Rapides, Louisiana. I submit his name for consul at Havana - "highest character, talent, moral worth and business qualifications." 1816-17 represented a District in Tennessee in Congress and since he removed to Louisiana has been elected several tines as member of State Senate. No man is better entitled to your confidence and hope you nominate him to the Senate. "I have presented Mr. Webster with various testimonials in favor of Gen Thomas, as well other Gentlemen,.... He is also personally acquainted with you."

I. Thomas to Z. Taylor - New Orleans, Feb. 13, 1850 - D Sir - Impression here that California will be admitted to Union this Session of Congress - In that event "I should have no objection to wear the ermine of Federal Judiciary in the new State, if suitable provision is made to sustain the dignity of the bench in that golden region." From message of Governor appears probable that California will adopt "body of the laws of this State, my long practice under them may be something of a recommendation." He said he had perhaps infringed upon etiquette and presumed too far on our acquaintance in thus addressing you directly. Had been induced to do so for three reasons. l-Wrote you about period of your inauguration and now have reason to believe my letter did not reach you. 2-Have no personal or political friends in Washington to make know my wishes. 3-Now engaged in professional pursuits here which would be seriously affected by visiting abroad.  Altho without personal political friends in Washington there are those there - "Our members of Congress" to whom my legal qualifications are known and who would I presume bear testimony to them if necessary. "Here I am not without numerous ardent and devoted personal and political friends."

Logan Huston ? to Z. Taylor, Pres. U.S. New Orleans April 11, 1850 - Believes laws of U.S. will be extended over California soon - presents name of Gen Isaac Thomas of Alexandria, La. for judge in that distant region. Gen Thomas is personally known to you - regarded as "one of the soundest lawyers in this State." He has "great energy, ripe and mature intellect, and his knowledge of the Spanish laws and usages eminently qualify him for the office." His numberous friends here would regret his loss, but would be pleased if his wishes were gratified."

Alfred ? to Genl Z. Taylor, Pres. of U.S. - New Orleans 1 May 1850 - Recommended Thomas for California judgeship - "he has practiced law in this State for more than thirty years."

P.A. Rost to Z. Taylor, Pres of U.S. - New Orleans June 7, 1850 -"You have lived too long in Louisiana not to be familiar with the name and reputation of Gen Thomas." Thirty years I ago he had no superior before Bar of the western district of this State. He has improved ever since just as you have. Has a thorough knowledge of laws of Spain in relation to succession and land titles. "Your son has bought plantation in sight of nine. I hope he will be neighborly."

J.P. Benjamin to Hon. John M. Clayton - New Orleans 12 June 1850 - old and valued friend Gen Isaac Thomas." He said Thomas to visit Washington and present his claims and his letter was an introduction for Thomas. "Impossible to find a gentleman more highly gifted." Mentioned Thomas "old and intimate with Civil Law, with the Spanish and French jurisprudence, and with those languages, adapt him singularly to fulfil the duties of a judge in a territory of a state like California."  His "personal character is above the very shadow of suspicion." Trust you can aid him."

5FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=22614805. "US Congressman. He was raised in Winchester, Tennessee after the death of his parents, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808 and became an attorney in Winchester. In 1814 he was elected to the US House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican and served one term, 1815 to 1817. In 1819 he relocated to Alexandria, Louisiana, where he continued to practice law. Thomas also introduced sugar cane cultivation to Louisiana, becoming one of the state's largest landholders and slave owners, and also operating sawmills, steamboats and other enterprises. Thomas served in the Louisiana Senate from 1823 to 1827 and was also a Brigadier General in the state militia. In 1849 he relocated to California during the Gold Rush, but he subsequently returned to Louisiana, where he continued to pursue his farming and business interests." Image.


Anne Pryor

1C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p.26, FHC 921.73 T363w. "In the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927, the following on ISAAC THOMAS, JR.: "A representative from Tennessee, born in Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784; after the death of his parents, he moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1800; self-educated; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Winchester; elected as a Democrat to the fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817; moved to Alexandria, Rapids Parish, Louisiana, in 1819 resumed the practice of law; purchased vast tracts of land adjoining Alexandria and became one of the largest landowners and slave holders in Louisiana; was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of sawmills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate in 1823-1827; moved to California in 1848; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died on February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapids Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana."

Since Isaac Thomas, Sr., died in 1818, Isaac Thomas, Jr. must have moved to Winchester after this date.  He was still in Sevierville in 1809 because he signed a petition to the Tennessee Legislature in that year, and he was in Sevierville in 1810, because he became Curcuit Court Clerk in the latter part of that year. In any event, it is not likely he would have left in 1800, because he was only 16 years old at that time."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 17 Oct 1961, Mason, T. "Letter to Mr. William Thomas of Athens, Tenn:
It was Judge Samuel C. Williams who made the statement I believe in his "Lost State of Franklin, "that Congressman Isaac Thomas was either a son or nephew of old Isaac, but of course Judge Williams had made no special study of this problem. I think you are putting too much faith in the Congressional Directory sketch of Congressman Isaac. To begin with this book was published in 1927 or 1928, so Congressman Isaac could not have given this information. Also, the sketch is in error when it states that he left Sevierville and settled at Winchester in 1800. There was no Winchester, Tennessee in 1800 -- this town was founded until 1812 and Franklin County was not established until 1807. In fact I am not sure that he ever lived in Winchester. His residence when he served in Congress was given as Sparta, county seat of White County. The last record I have of him here is 1810 when he became circuit court clerk. His bond in the State Archives was signed by old Isaac who made his mark, indicating either illiteracy or physical incapacity. He served in a War of 1812 outfit in Middle Tennessee, but he got the title "General" in Louisiana where he was brigadier general of the Louisiana militia.

I have located a large number of letters in the National Archives, some written by him and some by others about him, asking for his appointment as federal judge and ambassador to some country. Also, the Louisiana Archives has many letters regarding our General Thomas. I intend to get microfilm copies of those letters as soon as possible. I am hopeful that these letters will reveal still more about him.

The value of the two old letters I have cited as source material comes from the fact that both letters are contemporary with the period when General Isaac Thomas lived, and not based on tradition.

I have tried to run down the date (1784) given in the Directory as the date of his birth --the exact date given was Nov. 4, 1764. Old Isaac had one daughter Lucretia, who married Robert Wear -- they settled in Blount County, now Loudon County, and lived on the Little Tennessee River near the present Greenpack -- the farm is still in the Wear family. This Wear family was neighbors of the Douthitts. In the old family cemetery on this Wear farm there is a marker to Lucretia's grave which gives the date of her birth as Aug. (?) 1784. She may have been a twin to Isaac, Jr. General Thomas' was buried at Pineville on the lot of his second wife's family, but apparently his grave is unmarked. I have had two persons look for his marker, but neighbor one found any marker. Polly Ann (Timothy) Douthitt was born in 1782, according to family records and to the marker at her grave, so old Isaac must have married Elizabeth, (Massengill) Timothy about the year 1783. Right now I feel that Isaac Jr. and Lucretia were twins and it be my guess that the date on her rock and in the Douthitt Bible would be the correct birth date, rather than the one in the Directory."

3Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas, Texas:
... it is my belief that he was the oldest son.  Apparently he became a lawyer before leaving Sevier County, and was appointed circuit court clerk of Sevier County in 1810; he received his appointment from the governor of Tennessee. Also, I have his name on a petition to the Tennessee legislature, filed from Sevierville in 1809, and in 1808 he was granted a commission as captain of a Sevier County malitia company. Apparently he left Sevier County before his father's death in 1818 because he served in a Middle Tennessee company during the War of 1812.  He became lieutenant of this company and was appointed adjutant of the entire regiment, of which his company was a part. Then he was elected to Congress from a Middle Tennessee district in 1814, and served from 1815 to 1817. During this period his time seems to have been at Winchester, Williamson Co., Tennessee, where he was first married to a Miss Pryor. About 1819 Isaac Thomas Jr. moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, and a daughter, Adelia Elizabeth Thomas, was born here, Jan. 13, 1821 the latter was married twice and her first husband was Ebenezer Flint; they had five daughters, only one of which lived to marry and she left no heirs. Another daughter, Annie, Thomas, married William Ennemond Menillon Wells. Isaac Thomas married a second time and his second wife's name was Emerline Flint; they had no children, and there are no living descendants of this Thomas. He may have married the third time, but I have no data on his supposed third marriage.

Isaac Thomas Jr. practiced Law in Louisiana and became a large land owner in the Alexandria region and a sugar planter; it is said that he was a very wealthy man when he died in 1859. It seems that the Flint family, his second wife's people inherited his large estate. That he was a prominent man in the Louisiana is shown by the following statement from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927: "was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of saw mills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate, 1823-1827; moved to California in 1849; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana.."

In the congressional Directory quoted above it also stated that Isaac Thomas Jr. was born in "Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784," but I have found a conflict with this date; when he filed for bounty land which his service as a soldier in the War of 1812 entitled him to, he made application from New Orleans, 5 April 1851, and stated that he was 59 years old at that time. This would make the date of his birth, 1792, rather than 1784. I am at a loss to explain this discrepancy. I would like to know the source of the date, 1784, given in the Directory; this must be the correct date, because if he was born in 1792 he would have been too young to serve in Congress in 1815. Does the Bible Record in your possession have the date of the births of John Thomas' brothers and sisters?

Represented Maury County, Tennessee, in the legislature of 1825-27. He was sent as minister to England. The silver watch he sent nephew Isaac Thomas Douthitt is still possessed by descendants. Later he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas. A letter in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth Douthitt Ghermly or Ghormly, Lenior City Tennessee, was written by her grandfather, Isaac Thomas Douthitt while on his way to Mexican border, and he stated that he passed within 90 miles of the home of his uncle Isaac Thomas but did not have time to visit him. Another document shows that Isaac Thomas advanced money to her grandfather who was sick in the Mexican War. The records of the War of 1812 show that Isaac Thomas and son Isaac Jr. had active service in this war."

4National Archives, Sharp, J.A. - research (microfilm), 21 Aug 1953, McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. "NATIONAL ARCHIVES -- Microfilm Copies, Correspondence regarding appointment of General Isaac Thomas to U.S. Consulship at Havana, Cuba, 1841, and appointment to Federal Judgeship in California, 1850. This Microfilm strip was given to McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee.

New Orleans, Jany 10, 1841 -- Gen. Isaac Thomas to Pres. Wm. H. Harrison - Dear Sir- Presuming on slight acquaintance we formed when members of Congress - "(you from Ohio and me from Tennessee) in Sessions 15, 16 & 17 and acquaintance and friendship between you and Mr. Flint my wife's father." Altho my general health has been and now good- have been for several years afflicted "with Rheumatism." My medical friends advise a residence of a few years in Cuba as likely means restoring me. Would like appointment as consul in Havana if office becomes vacant - feels he could discharge office with "credit to my country."
Your obt Servt
I Thomas

A W. Roman(Governor) to Hon E.D. White- New Orleans, Feb. 15, 1841 - Gen Isaac Thomas informs me he is applicant consul at Havana. "The great commercial intercourse between this City and the Island of Cuba" makes it important to interests of Louisiana that someone acquainted with those interests be appointed. Gen. Thomas- "his character and his services" qualify him. You know he is fully competent.

R. Gant land of Sanland (?) of Louisiana to Pres. Harrison - Washington - March 6, l840 ? (1841) ? - Enclosed is letter recommending General Isaac Thomas of Parish Rapides, Louisiana. I submit his name for consul at Havana - "highest character, talent, moral worth and business qualifications." 1816-17 represented a District in Tennessee in Congress and since he removed to Louisiana has been elected several tines as member of State Senate. No man is better entitled to your confidence and hope you nominate him to the Senate. "I have presented Mr. Webster with various testimonials in favor of Gen Thomas, as well other Gentlemen,.... He is also personally acquainted with you."

I. Thomas to Z. Taylor - New Orleans, Feb. 13, 1850 - D Sir - Impression here that California will be admitted to Union this Session of Congress - In that event "I should have no objection to wear the ermine of Federal Judiciary in the new State, if suitable provision is made to sustain the dignity of the bench in that golden region." From message of Governor appears probable that California will adopt "body of the laws of this State, my long practice under them may be something of a recommendation." He said he had perhaps infringed upon etiquette and presumed too far on our acquaintance in thus addressing you directly. Had been induced to do so for three reasons. l-Wrote you about period of your inauguration and now have reason to believe my letter did not reach you. 2-Have no personal or political friends in Washington to make know my wishes. 3-Now engaged in professional pursuits here which would be seriously affected by visiting abroad.  Altho without personal political friends in Washington there are those there - "Our members of Congress" to whom my legal qualifications are known and who would I presume bear testimony to them if necessary. "Here I am not without numerous ardent and devoted personal and political friends."

Logan Huston ? to Z. Taylor, Pres. U.S. New Orleans April 11, 1850 - Believes laws of U.S. will be extended over California soon - presents name of Gen Isaac Thomas of Alexandria, La. for judge in that distant region. Gen Thomas is personally known to you - regarded as "one of the soundest lawyers in this State." He has "great energy, ripe and mature intellect, and his knowledge of the Spanish laws and usages eminently qualify him for the office." His numberous friends here would regret his loss, but would be pleased if his wishes were gratified."

Alfred ? to Genl Z. Taylor, Pres. of U.S. - New Orleans 1 May 1850 - Recommended Thomas for California judgeship - "he has practiced law in this State for more than thirty years."

P.A. Rost to Z. Taylor, Pres of U.S. - New Orleans June 7, 1850 -"You have lived too long in Louisiana not to be familiar with the name and reputation of Gen Thomas." Thirty years I ago he had no superior before Bar of the western district of this State. He has improved ever since just as you have. Has a thorough knowledge of laws of Spain in relation to succession and land titles. "Your son has bought plantation in sight of nine. I hope he will be neighborly."

J.P. Benjamin to Hon. John M. Clayton - New Orleans 12 June 1850 - old and valued friend Gen Isaac Thomas." He said Thomas to visit Washington and present his claims and his letter was an introduction for Thomas. "Impossible to find a gentleman more highly gifted." Mentioned Thomas "old and intimate with Civil Law, with the Spanish and French jurisprudence, and with those languages, adapt him singularly to fulfil the duties of a judge in a territory of a state like California."  His "personal character is above the very shadow of suspicion." Trust you can aid him."


General Isaac Thomas Jr.

1C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p.26, FHC 921.73 T363w. "In the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927, the following on ISAAC THOMAS, JR.: "A representative from Tennessee, born in Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784; after the death of his parents, he moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1800; self-educated; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Winchester; elected as a Democrat to the fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817; moved to Alexandria, Rapids Parish, Louisiana, in 1819 resumed the practice of law; purchased vast tracts of land adjoining Alexandria and became one of the largest landowners and slave holders in Louisiana; was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of sawmills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate in 1823-1827; moved to California in 1848; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died on February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapids Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana."

Since Isaac Thomas, Sr., died in 1818, Isaac Thomas, Jr. must have moved to Winchester after this date.  He was still in Sevierville in 1809 because he signed a petition to the Tennessee Legislature in that year, and he was in Sevierville in 1810, because he became Curcuit Court Clerk in the latter part of that year. In any event, it is not likely he would have left in 1800, because he was only 16 years old at that time."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 17 Oct 1961, Mason, T. "Letter to Mr. William Thomas of Athens, Tenn:
It was Judge Samuel C. Williams who made the statement I believe in his "Lost State of Franklin, "that Congressman Isaac Thomas was either a son or nephew of old Isaac, but of course Judge Williams had made no special study of this problem. I think you are putting too much faith in the Congressional Directory sketch of Congressman Isaac. To begin with this book was published in 1927 or 1928, so Congressman Isaac could not have given this information. Also, the sketch is in error when it states that he left Sevierville and settled at Winchester in 1800. There was no Winchester, Tennessee in 1800 -- this town was founded until 1812 and Franklin County was not established until 1807. In fact I am not sure that he ever lived in Winchester. His residence when he served in Congress was given as Sparta, county seat of White County. The last record I have of him here is 1810 when he became circuit court clerk. His bond in the State Archives was signed by old Isaac who made his mark, indicating either illiteracy or physical incapacity. He served in a War of 1812 outfit in Middle Tennessee, but he got the title "General" in Louisiana where he was brigadier general of the Louisiana militia.

I have located a large number of letters in the National Archives, some written by him and some by others about him, asking for his appointment as federal judge and ambassador to some country. Also, the Louisiana Archives has many letters regarding our General Thomas. I intend to get microfilm copies of those letters as soon as possible. I am hopeful that these letters will reveal still more about him.

The value of the two old letters I have cited as source material comes from the fact that both letters are contemporary with the period when General Isaac Thomas lived, and not based on tradition.

I have tried to run down the date (1784) given in the Directory as the date of his birth --the exact date given was Nov. 4, 1764. Old Isaac had one daughter Lucretia, who married Robert Wear -- they settled in Blount County, now Loudon County, and lived on the Little Tennessee River near the present Greenpack -- the farm is still in the Wear family. This Wear family was neighbors of the Douthitts. In the old family cemetery on this Wear farm there is a marker to Lucretia's grave which gives the date of her birth as Aug. (?) 1784. She may have been a twin to Isaac, Jr. General Thomas' was buried at Pineville on the lot of his second wife's family, but apparently his grave is unmarked. I have had two persons look for his marker, but neighbor one found any marker. Polly Ann (Timothy) Douthitt was born in 1782, according to family records and to the marker at her grave, so old Isaac must have married Elizabeth, (Massengill) Timothy about the year 1783. Right now I feel that Isaac Jr. and Lucretia were twins and it be my guess that the date on her rock and in the Douthitt Bible would be the correct birth date, rather than the one in the Directory."

3Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas, Texas:
... it is my belief that he was the oldest son.  Apparently he became a lawyer before leaving Sevier County, and was appointed circuit court clerk of Sevier County in 1810; he received his appointment from the governor of Tennessee. Also, I have his name on a petition to the Tennessee legislature, filed from Sevierville in 1809, and in 1808 he was granted a commission as captain of a Sevier County malitia company. Apparently he left Sevier County before his father's death in 1818 because he served in a Middle Tennessee company during the War of 1812.  He became lieutenant of this company and was appointed adjutant of the entire regiment, of which his company was a part. Then he was elected to Congress from a Middle Tennessee district in 1814, and served from 1815 to 1817. During this period his time seems to have been at Winchester, Williamson Co., Tennessee, where he was first married to a Miss Pryor. About 1819 Isaac Thomas Jr. moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, and a daughter, Adelia Elizabeth Thomas, was born here, Jan. 13, 1821 the latter was married twice and her first husband was Ebenezer Flint; they had five daughters, only one of which lived to marry and she left no heirs. Another daughter, Annie, Thomas, married William Ennemond Menillon Wells. Isaac Thomas married a second time and his second wife's name was Emerline Flint; they had no children, and there are no living descendants of this Thomas. He may have married the third time, but I have no data on his supposed third marriage.

Isaac Thomas Jr. practiced Law in Louisiana and became a large land owner in the Alexandria region and a sugar planter; it is said that he was a very wealthy man when he died in 1859. It seems that the Flint family, his second wife's people inherited his large estate. That he was a prominent man in the Louisiana is shown by the following statement from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927: "was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of saw mills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate, 1823-1827; moved to California in 1849; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana.."

In the congressional Directory quoted above it also stated that Isaac Thomas Jr. was born in "Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784," but I have found a conflict with this date; when he filed for bounty land which his service as a soldier in the War of 1812 entitled him to, he made application from New Orleans, 5 April 1851, and stated that he was 59 years old at that time. This would make the date of his birth, 1792, rather than 1784. I am at a loss to explain this discrepancy. I would like to know the source of the date, 1784, given in the Directory; this must be the correct date, because if he was born in 1792 he would have been too young to serve in Congress in 1815. Does the Bible Record in your possession have the date of the births of John Thomas' brothers and sisters?

Represented Maury County, Tennessee, in the legislature of 1825-27. He was sent as minister to England. The silver watch he sent nephew Isaac Thomas Douthitt is still possessed by descendants. Later he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas. A letter in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth Douthitt Ghermly or Ghormly, Lenior City Tennessee, was written by her grandfather, Isaac Thomas Douthitt while on his way to Mexican border, and he stated that he passed within 90 miles of the home of his uncle Isaac Thomas but did not have time to visit him. Another document shows that Isaac Thomas advanced money to her grandfather who was sick in the Mexican War. The records of the War of 1812 show that Isaac Thomas and son Isaac Jr. had active service in this war."

4National Archives, Sharp, J.A. - research (microfilm), 21 Aug 1953, McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. "NATIONAL ARCHIVES -- Microfilm Copies, Correspondence regarding appointment of General Isaac Thomas to U.S. Consulship at Havana, Cuba, 1841, and appointment to Federal Judgeship in California, 1850. This Microfilm strip was given to McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee.

New Orleans, Jany 10, 1841 -- Gen. Isaac Thomas to Pres. Wm. H. Harrison - Dear Sir- Presuming on slight acquaintance we formed when members of Congress - "(you from Ohio and me from Tennessee) in Sessions 15, 16 & 17 and acquaintance and friendship between you and Mr. Flint my wife's father." Altho my general health has been and now good- have been for several years afflicted "with Rheumatism." My medical friends advise a residence of a few years in Cuba as likely means restoring me. Would like appointment as consul in Havana if office becomes vacant - feels he could discharge office with "credit to my country."
Your obt Servt
I Thomas

A W. Roman(Governor) to Hon E.D. White- New Orleans, Feb. 15, 1841 - Gen Isaac Thomas informs me he is applicant consul at Havana. "The great commercial intercourse between this City and the Island of Cuba" makes it important to interests of Louisiana that someone acquainted with those interests be appointed. Gen. Thomas- "his character and his services" qualify him. You know he is fully competent.

R. Gant land of Sanland (?) of Louisiana to Pres. Harrison - Washington - March 6, l840 ? (1841) ? - Enclosed is letter recommending General Isaac Thomas of Parish Rapides, Louisiana. I submit his name for consul at Havana - "highest character, talent, moral worth and business qualifications." 1816-17 represented a District in Tennessee in Congress and since he removed to Louisiana has been elected several tines as member of State Senate. No man is better entitled to your confidence and hope you nominate him to the Senate. "I have presented Mr. Webster with various testimonials in favor of Gen Thomas, as well other Gentlemen,.... He is also personally acquainted with you."

I. Thomas to Z. Taylor - New Orleans, Feb. 13, 1850 - D Sir - Impression here that California will be admitted to Union this Session of Congress - In that event "I should have no objection to wear the ermine of Federal Judiciary in the new State, if suitable provision is made to sustain the dignity of the bench in that golden region." From message of Governor appears probable that California will adopt "body of the laws of this State, my long practice under them may be something of a recommendation." He said he had perhaps infringed upon etiquette and presumed too far on our acquaintance in thus addressing you directly. Had been induced to do so for three reasons. l-Wrote you about period of your inauguration and now have reason to believe my letter did not reach you. 2-Have no personal or political friends in Washington to make know my wishes. 3-Now engaged in professional pursuits here which would be seriously affected by visiting abroad.  Altho without personal political friends in Washington there are those there - "Our members of Congress" to whom my legal qualifications are known and who would I presume bear testimony to them if necessary. "Here I am not without numerous ardent and devoted personal and political friends."

Logan Huston ? to Z. Taylor, Pres. U.S. New Orleans April 11, 1850 - Believes laws of U.S. will be extended over California soon - presents name of Gen Isaac Thomas of Alexandria, La. for judge in that distant region. Gen Thomas is personally known to you - regarded as "one of the soundest lawyers in this State." He has "great energy, ripe and mature intellect, and his knowledge of the Spanish laws and usages eminently qualify him for the office." His numberous friends here would regret his loss, but would be pleased if his wishes were gratified."

Alfred ? to Genl Z. Taylor, Pres. of U.S. - New Orleans 1 May 1850 - Recommended Thomas for California judgeship - "he has practiced law in this State for more than thirty years."

P.A. Rost to Z. Taylor, Pres of U.S. - New Orleans June 7, 1850 -"You have lived too long in Louisiana not to be familiar with the name and reputation of Gen Thomas." Thirty years I ago he had no superior before Bar of the western district of this State. He has improved ever since just as you have. Has a thorough knowledge of laws of Spain in relation to succession and land titles. "Your son has bought plantation in sight of nine. I hope he will be neighborly."

J.P. Benjamin to Hon. John M. Clayton - New Orleans 12 June 1850 - old and valued friend Gen Isaac Thomas." He said Thomas to visit Washington and present his claims and his letter was an introduction for Thomas. "Impossible to find a gentleman more highly gifted." Mentioned Thomas "old and intimate with Civil Law, with the Spanish and French jurisprudence, and with those languages, adapt him singularly to fulfil the duties of a judge in a territory of a state like California."  His "personal character is above the very shadow of suspicion." Trust you can aid him."

5FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=22614805. "US Congressman. He was raised in Winchester, Tennessee after the death of his parents, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808 and became an attorney in Winchester. In 1814 he was elected to the US House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican and served one term, 1815 to 1817. In 1819 he relocated to Alexandria, Louisiana, where he continued to practice law. Thomas also introduced sugar cane cultivation to Louisiana, becoming one of the state's largest landholders and slave owners, and also operating sawmills, steamboats and other enterprises. Thomas served in the Louisiana Senate from 1823 to 1827 and was also a Brigadier General in the state militia. In 1849 he relocated to California during the Gold Rush, but he subsequently returned to Louisiana, where he continued to pursue his farming and business interests." Image.


Jane M. Bullard

1C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p.26, FHC 921.73 T363w. "In the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927, the following on ISAAC THOMAS, JR.: "A representative from Tennessee, born in Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784; after the death of his parents, he moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1800; self-educated; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Winchester; elected as a Democrat to the fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817; moved to Alexandria, Rapids Parish, Louisiana, in 1819 resumed the practice of law; purchased vast tracts of land adjoining Alexandria and became one of the largest landowners and slave holders in Louisiana; was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of sawmills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate in 1823-1827; moved to California in 1848; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died on February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapids Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana."

Since Isaac Thomas, Sr., died in 1818, Isaac Thomas, Jr. must have moved to Winchester after this date.  He was still in Sevierville in 1809 because he signed a petition to the Tennessee Legislature in that year, and he was in Sevierville in 1810, because he became Curcuit Court Clerk in the latter part of that year. In any event, it is not likely he would have left in 1800, because he was only 16 years old at that time."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 17 Oct 1961, Mason, T. "Letter to Mr. William Thomas of Athens, Tenn:
It was Judge Samuel C. Williams who made the statement I believe in his "Lost State of Franklin, "that Congressman Isaac Thomas was either a son or nephew of old Isaac, but of course Judge Williams had made no special study of this problem. I think you are putting too much faith in the Congressional Directory sketch of Congressman Isaac. To begin with this book was published in 1927 or 1928, so Congressman Isaac could not have given this information. Also, the sketch is in error when it states that he left Sevierville and settled at Winchester in 1800. There was no Winchester, Tennessee in 1800 -- this town was founded until 1812 and Franklin County was not established until 1807. In fact I am not sure that he ever lived in Winchester. His residence when he served in Congress was given as Sparta, county seat of White County. The last record I have of him here is 1810 when he became circuit court clerk. His bond in the State Archives was signed by old Isaac who made his mark, indicating either illiteracy or physical incapacity. He served in a War of 1812 outfit in Middle Tennessee, but he got the title "General" in Louisiana where he was brigadier general of the Louisiana militia.

I have located a large number of letters in the National Archives, some written by him and some by others about him, asking for his appointment as federal judge and ambassador to some country. Also, the Louisiana Archives has many letters regarding our General Thomas. I intend to get microfilm copies of those letters as soon as possible. I am hopeful that these letters will reveal still more about him.

The value of the two old letters I have cited as source material comes from the fact that both letters are contemporary with the period when General Isaac Thomas lived, and not based on tradition.

I have tried to run down the date (1784) given in the Directory as the date of his birth --the exact date given was Nov. 4, 1764. Old Isaac had one daughter Lucretia, who married Robert Wear -- they settled in Blount County, now Loudon County, and lived on the Little Tennessee River near the present Greenpack -- the farm is still in the Wear family. This Wear family was neighbors of the Douthitts. In the old family cemetery on this Wear farm there is a marker to Lucretia's grave which gives the date of her birth as Aug. (?) 1784. She may have been a twin to Isaac, Jr. General Thomas' was buried at Pineville on the lot of his second wife's family, but apparently his grave is unmarked. I have had two persons look for his marker, but neighbor one found any marker. Polly Ann (Timothy) Douthitt was born in 1782, according to family records and to the marker at her grave, so old Isaac must have married Elizabeth, (Massengill) Timothy about the year 1783. Right now I feel that Isaac Jr. and Lucretia were twins and it be my guess that the date on her rock and in the Douthitt Bible would be the correct birth date, rather than the one in the Directory."

3Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas, Texas:
... it is my belief that he was the oldest son.  Apparently he became a lawyer before leaving Sevier County, and was appointed circuit court clerk of Sevier County in 1810; he received his appointment from the governor of Tennessee. Also, I have his name on a petition to the Tennessee legislature, filed from Sevierville in 1809, and in 1808 he was granted a commission as captain of a Sevier County malitia company. Apparently he left Sevier County before his father's death in 1818 because he served in a Middle Tennessee company during the War of 1812.  He became lieutenant of this company and was appointed adjutant of the entire regiment, of which his company was a part. Then he was elected to Congress from a Middle Tennessee district in 1814, and served from 1815 to 1817. During this period his time seems to have been at Winchester, Williamson Co., Tennessee, where he was first married to a Miss Pryor. About 1819 Isaac Thomas Jr. moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, and a daughter, Adelia Elizabeth Thomas, was born here, Jan. 13, 1821 the latter was married twice and her first husband was Ebenezer Flint; they had five daughters, only one of which lived to marry and she left no heirs. Another daughter, Annie, Thomas, married William Ennemond Menillon Wells. Isaac Thomas married a second time and his second wife's name was Emerline Flint; they had no children, and there are no living descendants of this Thomas. He may have married the third time, but I have no data on his supposed third marriage.

Isaac Thomas Jr. practiced Law in Louisiana and became a large land owner in the Alexandria region and a sugar planter; it is said that he was a very wealthy man when he died in 1859. It seems that the Flint family, his second wife's people inherited his large estate. That he was a prominent man in the Louisiana is shown by the following statement from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927: "was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of saw mills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate, 1823-1827; moved to California in 1849; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana.."

In the congressional Directory quoted above it also stated that Isaac Thomas Jr. was born in "Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784," but I have found a conflict with this date; when he filed for bounty land which his service as a soldier in the War of 1812 entitled him to, he made application from New Orleans, 5 April 1851, and stated that he was 59 years old at that time. This would make the date of his birth, 1792, rather than 1784. I am at a loss to explain this discrepancy. I would like to know the source of the date, 1784, given in the Directory; this must be the correct date, because if he was born in 1792 he would have been too young to serve in Congress in 1815. Does the Bible Record in your possession have the date of the births of John Thomas' brothers and sisters?

Represented Maury County, Tennessee, in the legislature of 1825-27. He was sent as minister to England. The silver watch he sent nephew Isaac Thomas Douthitt is still possessed by descendants. Later he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas. A letter in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth Douthitt Ghermly or Ghormly, Lenior City Tennessee, was written by her grandfather, Isaac Thomas Douthitt while on his way to Mexican border, and he stated that he passed within 90 miles of the home of his uncle Isaac Thomas but did not have time to visit him. Another document shows that Isaac Thomas advanced money to her grandfather who was sick in the Mexican War. The records of the War of 1812 show that Isaac Thomas and son Isaac Jr. had active service in this war."

4National Archives, Sharp, J.A. - research (microfilm), 21 Aug 1953, McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. "NATIONAL ARCHIVES -- Microfilm Copies, Correspondence regarding appointment of General Isaac Thomas to U.S. Consulship at Havana, Cuba, 1841, and appointment to Federal Judgeship in California, 1850. This Microfilm strip was given to McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee.

New Orleans, Jany 10, 1841 -- Gen. Isaac Thomas to Pres. Wm. H. Harrison - Dear Sir- Presuming on slight acquaintance we formed when members of Congress - "(you from Ohio and me from Tennessee) in Sessions 15, 16 & 17 and acquaintance and friendship between you and Mr. Flint my wife's father." Altho my general health has been and now good- have been for several years afflicted "with Rheumatism." My medical friends advise a residence of a few years in Cuba as likely means restoring me. Would like appointment as consul in Havana if office becomes vacant - feels he could discharge office with "credit to my country."
Your obt Servt
I Thomas

A W. Roman(Governor) to Hon E.D. White- New Orleans, Feb. 15, 1841 - Gen Isaac Thomas informs me he is applicant consul at Havana. "The great commercial intercourse between this City and the Island of Cuba" makes it important to interests of Louisiana that someone acquainted with those interests be appointed. Gen. Thomas- "his character and his services" qualify him. You know he is fully competent.

R. Gant land of Sanland (?) of Louisiana to Pres. Harrison - Washington - March 6, l840 ? (1841) ? - Enclosed is letter recommending General Isaac Thomas of Parish Rapides, Louisiana. I submit his name for consul at Havana - "highest character, talent, moral worth and business qualifications." 1816-17 represented a District in Tennessee in Congress and since he removed to Louisiana has been elected several tines as member of State Senate. No man is better entitled to your confidence and hope you nominate him to the Senate. "I have presented Mr. Webster with various testimonials in favor of Gen Thomas, as well other Gentlemen,.... He is also personally acquainted with you."

I. Thomas to Z. Taylor - New Orleans, Feb. 13, 1850 - D Sir - Impression here that California will be admitted to Union this Session of Congress - In that event "I should have no objection to wear the ermine of Federal Judiciary in the new State, if suitable provision is made to sustain the dignity of the bench in that golden region." From message of Governor appears probable that California will adopt "body of the laws of this State, my long practice under them may be something of a recommendation." He said he had perhaps infringed upon etiquette and presumed too far on our acquaintance in thus addressing you directly. Had been induced to do so for three reasons. l-Wrote you about period of your inauguration and now have reason to believe my letter did not reach you. 2-Have no personal or political friends in Washington to make know my wishes. 3-Now engaged in professional pursuits here which would be seriously affected by visiting abroad.  Altho without personal political friends in Washington there are those there - "Our members of Congress" to whom my legal qualifications are known and who would I presume bear testimony to them if necessary. "Here I am not without numerous ardent and devoted personal and political friends."

Logan Huston ? to Z. Taylor, Pres. U.S. New Orleans April 11, 1850 - Believes laws of U.S. will be extended over California soon - presents name of Gen Isaac Thomas of Alexandria, La. for judge in that distant region. Gen Thomas is personally known to you - regarded as "one of the soundest lawyers in this State." He has "great energy, ripe and mature intellect, and his knowledge of the Spanish laws and usages eminently qualify him for the office." His numberous friends here would regret his loss, but would be pleased if his wishes were gratified."

Alfred ? to Genl Z. Taylor, Pres. of U.S. - New Orleans 1 May 1850 - Recommended Thomas for California judgeship - "he has practiced law in this State for more than thirty years."

P.A. Rost to Z. Taylor, Pres of U.S. - New Orleans June 7, 1850 -"You have lived too long in Louisiana not to be familiar with the name and reputation of Gen Thomas." Thirty years I ago he had no superior before Bar of the western district of this State. He has improved ever since just as you have. Has a thorough knowledge of laws of Spain in relation to succession and land titles. "Your son has bought plantation in sight of nine. I hope he will be neighborly."

J.P. Benjamin to Hon. John M. Clayton - New Orleans 12 June 1850 - old and valued friend Gen Isaac Thomas." He said Thomas to visit Washington and present his claims and his letter was an introduction for Thomas. "Impossible to find a gentleman more highly gifted." Mentioned Thomas "old and intimate with Civil Law, with the Spanish and French jurisprudence, and with those languages, adapt him singularly to fulfil the duties of a judge in a territory of a state like California."  His "personal character is above the very shadow of suspicion." Trust you can aid him."


General Isaac Thomas Jr.

1C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p.26, FHC 921.73 T363w. "In the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927, the following on ISAAC THOMAS, JR.: "A representative from Tennessee, born in Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784; after the death of his parents, he moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1800; self-educated; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Winchester; elected as a Democrat to the fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817; moved to Alexandria, Rapids Parish, Louisiana, in 1819 resumed the practice of law; purchased vast tracts of land adjoining Alexandria and became one of the largest landowners and slave holders in Louisiana; was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of sawmills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate in 1823-1827; moved to California in 1848; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died on February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapids Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana."

Since Isaac Thomas, Sr., died in 1818, Isaac Thomas, Jr. must have moved to Winchester after this date.  He was still in Sevierville in 1809 because he signed a petition to the Tennessee Legislature in that year, and he was in Sevierville in 1810, because he became Curcuit Court Clerk in the latter part of that year. In any event, it is not likely he would have left in 1800, because he was only 16 years old at that time."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 17 Oct 1961, Mason, T. "Letter to Mr. William Thomas of Athens, Tenn:
It was Judge Samuel C. Williams who made the statement I believe in his "Lost State of Franklin, "that Congressman Isaac Thomas was either a son or nephew of old Isaac, but of course Judge Williams had made no special study of this problem. I think you are putting too much faith in the Congressional Directory sketch of Congressman Isaac. To begin with this book was published in 1927 or 1928, so Congressman Isaac could not have given this information. Also, the sketch is in error when it states that he left Sevierville and settled at Winchester in 1800. There was no Winchester, Tennessee in 1800 -- this town was founded until 1812 and Franklin County was not established until 1807. In fact I am not sure that he ever lived in Winchester. His residence when he served in Congress was given as Sparta, county seat of White County. The last record I have of him here is 1810 when he became circuit court clerk. His bond in the State Archives was signed by old Isaac who made his mark, indicating either illiteracy or physical incapacity. He served in a War of 1812 outfit in Middle Tennessee, but he got the title "General" in Louisiana where he was brigadier general of the Louisiana militia.

I have located a large number of letters in the National Archives, some written by him and some by others about him, asking for his appointment as federal judge and ambassador to some country. Also, the Louisiana Archives has many letters regarding our General Thomas. I intend to get microfilm copies of those letters as soon as possible. I am hopeful that these letters will reveal still more about him.

The value of the two old letters I have cited as source material comes from the fact that both letters are contemporary with the period when General Isaac Thomas lived, and not based on tradition.

I have tried to run down the date (1784) given in the Directory as the date of his birth --the exact date given was Nov. 4, 1764. Old Isaac had one daughter Lucretia, who married Robert Wear -- they settled in Blount County, now Loudon County, and lived on the Little Tennessee River near the present Greenpack -- the farm is still in the Wear family. This Wear family was neighbors of the Douthitts. In the old family cemetery on this Wear farm there is a marker to Lucretia's grave which gives the date of her birth as Aug. (?) 1784. She may have been a twin to Isaac, Jr. General Thomas' was buried at Pineville on the lot of his second wife's family, but apparently his grave is unmarked. I have had two persons look for his marker, but neighbor one found any marker. Polly Ann (Timothy) Douthitt was born in 1782, according to family records and to the marker at her grave, so old Isaac must have married Elizabeth, (Massengill) Timothy about the year 1783. Right now I feel that Isaac Jr. and Lucretia were twins and it be my guess that the date on her rock and in the Douthitt Bible would be the correct birth date, rather than the one in the Directory."

3Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas, Texas:
... it is my belief that he was the oldest son.  Apparently he became a lawyer before leaving Sevier County, and was appointed circuit court clerk of Sevier County in 1810; he received his appointment from the governor of Tennessee. Also, I have his name on a petition to the Tennessee legislature, filed from Sevierville in 1809, and in 1808 he was granted a commission as captain of a Sevier County malitia company. Apparently he left Sevier County before his father's death in 1818 because he served in a Middle Tennessee company during the War of 1812.  He became lieutenant of this company and was appointed adjutant of the entire regiment, of which his company was a part. Then he was elected to Congress from a Middle Tennessee district in 1814, and served from 1815 to 1817. During this period his time seems to have been at Winchester, Williamson Co., Tennessee, where he was first married to a Miss Pryor. About 1819 Isaac Thomas Jr. moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, and a daughter, Adelia Elizabeth Thomas, was born here, Jan. 13, 1821 the latter was married twice and her first husband was Ebenezer Flint; they had five daughters, only one of which lived to marry and she left no heirs. Another daughter, Annie, Thomas, married William Ennemond Menillon Wells. Isaac Thomas married a second time and his second wife's name was Emerline Flint; they had no children, and there are no living descendants of this Thomas. He may have married the third time, but I have no data on his supposed third marriage.

Isaac Thomas Jr. practiced Law in Louisiana and became a large land owner in the Alexandria region and a sugar planter; it is said that he was a very wealthy man when he died in 1859. It seems that the Flint family, his second wife's people inherited his large estate. That he was a prominent man in the Louisiana is shown by the following statement from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927: "was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of saw mills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate, 1823-1827; moved to California in 1849; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana.."

In the congressional Directory quoted above it also stated that Isaac Thomas Jr. was born in "Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784," but I have found a conflict with this date; when he filed for bounty land which his service as a soldier in the War of 1812 entitled him to, he made application from New Orleans, 5 April 1851, and stated that he was 59 years old at that time. This would make the date of his birth, 1792, rather than 1784. I am at a loss to explain this discrepancy. I would like to know the source of the date, 1784, given in the Directory; this must be the correct date, because if he was born in 1792 he would have been too young to serve in Congress in 1815. Does the Bible Record in your possession have the date of the births of John Thomas' brothers and sisters?

Represented Maury County, Tennessee, in the legislature of 1825-27. He was sent as minister to England. The silver watch he sent nephew Isaac Thomas Douthitt is still possessed by descendants. Later he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas. A letter in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth Douthitt Ghermly or Ghormly, Lenior City Tennessee, was written by her grandfather, Isaac Thomas Douthitt while on his way to Mexican border, and he stated that he passed within 90 miles of the home of his uncle Isaac Thomas but did not have time to visit him. Another document shows that Isaac Thomas advanced money to her grandfather who was sick in the Mexican War. The records of the War of 1812 show that Isaac Thomas and son Isaac Jr. had active service in this war."

4National Archives, Sharp, J.A. - research (microfilm), 21 Aug 1953, McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. "NATIONAL ARCHIVES -- Microfilm Copies, Correspondence regarding appointment of General Isaac Thomas to U.S. Consulship at Havana, Cuba, 1841, and appointment to Federal Judgeship in California, 1850. This Microfilm strip was given to McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee.

New Orleans, Jany 10, 1841 -- Gen. Isaac Thomas to Pres. Wm. H. Harrison - Dear Sir- Presuming on slight acquaintance we formed when members of Congress - "(you from Ohio and me from Tennessee) in Sessions 15, 16 & 17 and acquaintance and friendship between you and Mr. Flint my wife's father." Altho my general health has been and now good- have been for several years afflicted "with Rheumatism." My medical friends advise a residence of a few years in Cuba as likely means restoring me. Would like appointment as consul in Havana if office becomes vacant - feels he could discharge office with "credit to my country."
Your obt Servt
I Thomas

A W. Roman(Governor) to Hon E.D. White- New Orleans, Feb. 15, 1841 - Gen Isaac Thomas informs me he is applicant consul at Havana. "The great commercial intercourse between this City and the Island of Cuba" makes it important to interests of Louisiana that someone acquainted with those interests be appointed. Gen. Thomas- "his character and his services" qualify him. You know he is fully competent.

R. Gant land of Sanland (?) of Louisiana to Pres. Harrison - Washington - March 6, l840 ? (1841) ? - Enclosed is letter recommending General Isaac Thomas of Parish Rapides, Louisiana. I submit his name for consul at Havana - "highest character, talent, moral worth and business qualifications." 1816-17 represented a District in Tennessee in Congress and since he removed to Louisiana has been elected several tines as member of State Senate. No man is better entitled to your confidence and hope you nominate him to the Senate. "I have presented Mr. Webster with various testimonials in favor of Gen Thomas, as well other Gentlemen,.... He is also personally acquainted with you."

I. Thomas to Z. Taylor - New Orleans, Feb. 13, 1850 - D Sir - Impression here that California will be admitted to Union this Session of Congress - In that event "I should have no objection to wear the ermine of Federal Judiciary in the new State, if suitable provision is made to sustain the dignity of the bench in that golden region." From message of Governor appears probable that California will adopt "body of the laws of this State, my long practice under them may be something of a recommendation." He said he had perhaps infringed upon etiquette and presumed too far on our acquaintance in thus addressing you directly. Had been induced to do so for three reasons. l-Wrote you about period of your inauguration and now have reason to believe my letter did not reach you. 2-Have no personal or political friends in Washington to make know my wishes. 3-Now engaged in professional pursuits here which would be seriously affected by visiting abroad.  Altho without personal political friends in Washington there are those there - "Our members of Congress" to whom my legal qualifications are known and who would I presume bear testimony to them if necessary. "Here I am not without numerous ardent and devoted personal and political friends."

Logan Huston ? to Z. Taylor, Pres. U.S. New Orleans April 11, 1850 - Believes laws of U.S. will be extended over California soon - presents name of Gen Isaac Thomas of Alexandria, La. for judge in that distant region. Gen Thomas is personally known to you - regarded as "one of the soundest lawyers in this State." He has "great energy, ripe and mature intellect, and his knowledge of the Spanish laws and usages eminently qualify him for the office." His numberous friends here would regret his loss, but would be pleased if his wishes were gratified."

Alfred ? to Genl Z. Taylor, Pres. of U.S. - New Orleans 1 May 1850 - Recommended Thomas for California judgeship - "he has practiced law in this State for more than thirty years."

P.A. Rost to Z. Taylor, Pres of U.S. - New Orleans June 7, 1850 -"You have lived too long in Louisiana not to be familiar with the name and reputation of Gen Thomas." Thirty years I ago he had no superior before Bar of the western district of this State. He has improved ever since just as you have. Has a thorough knowledge of laws of Spain in relation to succession and land titles. "Your son has bought plantation in sight of nine. I hope he will be neighborly."

J.P. Benjamin to Hon. John M. Clayton - New Orleans 12 June 1850 - old and valued friend Gen Isaac Thomas." He said Thomas to visit Washington and present his claims and his letter was an introduction for Thomas. "Impossible to find a gentleman more highly gifted." Mentioned Thomas "old and intimate with Civil Law, with the Spanish and French jurisprudence, and with those languages, adapt him singularly to fulfil the duties of a judge in a territory of a state like California."  His "personal character is above the very shadow of suspicion." Trust you can aid him."

5FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=22614805. "US Congressman. He was raised in Winchester, Tennessee after the death of his parents, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808 and became an attorney in Winchester. In 1814 he was elected to the US House of Representatives as a Democratic-Republican and served one term, 1815 to 1817. In 1819 he relocated to Alexandria, Louisiana, where he continued to practice law. Thomas also introduced sugar cane cultivation to Louisiana, becoming one of the state's largest landholders and slave owners, and also operating sawmills, steamboats and other enterprises. Thomas served in the Louisiana Senate from 1823 to 1827 and was also a Brigadier General in the state militia. In 1849 he relocated to California during the Gold Rush, but he subsequently returned to Louisiana, where he continued to pursue his farming and business interests." Image.


Emerline Flint

1C.B. Wynn, Thomas, Isaac of Sevierville, Tennessee and a few of his descendants (Buckhorn Press, Gatlinburg, Tenn. 1980), p.26, FHC 921.73 T363w. "In the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927, the following on ISAAC THOMAS, JR.: "A representative from Tennessee, born in Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784; after the death of his parents, he moved to Winchester, Tennessee, in 1800; self-educated; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Winchester; elected as a Democrat to the fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815 - March 3, 1817; moved to Alexandria, Rapids Parish, Louisiana, in 1819 resumed the practice of law; purchased vast tracts of land adjoining Alexandria and became one of the largest landowners and slave holders in Louisiana; was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of sawmills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate in 1823-1827; moved to California in 1848; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died on February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapids Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana."

Since Isaac Thomas, Sr., died in 1818, Isaac Thomas, Jr. must have moved to Winchester after this date.  He was still in Sevierville in 1809 because he signed a petition to the Tennessee Legislature in that year, and he was in Sevierville in 1810, because he became Curcuit Court Clerk in the latter part of that year. In any event, it is not likely he would have left in 1800, because he was only 16 years old at that time."

2Sharp, J.A. - letter, 17 Oct 1961, Mason, T. "Letter to Mr. William Thomas of Athens, Tenn:
It was Judge Samuel C. Williams who made the statement I believe in his "Lost State of Franklin, "that Congressman Isaac Thomas was either a son or nephew of old Isaac, but of course Judge Williams had made no special study of this problem. I think you are putting too much faith in the Congressional Directory sketch of Congressman Isaac. To begin with this book was published in 1927 or 1928, so Congressman Isaac could not have given this information. Also, the sketch is in error when it states that he left Sevierville and settled at Winchester in 1800. There was no Winchester, Tennessee in 1800 -- this town was founded until 1812 and Franklin County was not established until 1807. In fact I am not sure that he ever lived in Winchester. His residence when he served in Congress was given as Sparta, county seat of White County. The last record I have of him here is 1810 when he became circuit court clerk. His bond in the State Archives was signed by old Isaac who made his mark, indicating either illiteracy or physical incapacity. He served in a War of 1812 outfit in Middle Tennessee, but he got the title "General" in Louisiana where he was brigadier general of the Louisiana militia.

I have located a large number of letters in the National Archives, some written by him and some by others about him, asking for his appointment as federal judge and ambassador to some country. Also, the Louisiana Archives has many letters regarding our General Thomas. I intend to get microfilm copies of those letters as soon as possible. I am hopeful that these letters will reveal still more about him.

The value of the two old letters I have cited as source material comes from the fact that both letters are contemporary with the period when General Isaac Thomas lived, and not based on tradition.

I have tried to run down the date (1784) given in the Directory as the date of his birth --the exact date given was Nov. 4, 1764. Old Isaac had one daughter Lucretia, who married Robert Wear -- they settled in Blount County, now Loudon County, and lived on the Little Tennessee River near the present Greenpack -- the farm is still in the Wear family. This Wear family was neighbors of the Douthitts. In the old family cemetery on this Wear farm there is a marker to Lucretia's grave which gives the date of her birth as Aug. (?) 1784. She may have been a twin to Isaac, Jr. General Thomas' was buried at Pineville on the lot of his second wife's family, but apparently his grave is unmarked. I have had two persons look for his marker, but neighbor one found any marker. Polly Ann (Timothy) Douthitt was born in 1782, according to family records and to the marker at her grave, so old Isaac must have married Elizabeth, (Massengill) Timothy about the year 1783. Right now I feel that Isaac Jr. and Lucretia were twins and it be my guess that the date on her rock and in the Douthitt Bible would be the correct birth date, rather than the one in the Directory."

3Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas, Texas:
... it is my belief that he was the oldest son.  Apparently he became a lawyer before leaving Sevier County, and was appointed circuit court clerk of Sevier County in 1810; he received his appointment from the governor of Tennessee. Also, I have his name on a petition to the Tennessee legislature, filed from Sevierville in 1809, and in 1808 he was granted a commission as captain of a Sevier County malitia company. Apparently he left Sevier County before his father's death in 1818 because he served in a Middle Tennessee company during the War of 1812.  He became lieutenant of this company and was appointed adjutant of the entire regiment, of which his company was a part. Then he was elected to Congress from a Middle Tennessee district in 1814, and served from 1815 to 1817. During this period his time seems to have been at Winchester, Williamson Co., Tennessee, where he was first married to a Miss Pryor. About 1819 Isaac Thomas Jr. moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, and a daughter, Adelia Elizabeth Thomas, was born here, Jan. 13, 1821 the latter was married twice and her first husband was Ebenezer Flint; they had five daughters, only one of which lived to marry and she left no heirs. Another daughter, Annie, Thomas, married William Ennemond Menillon Wells. Isaac Thomas married a second time and his second wife's name was Emerline Flint; they had no children, and there are no living descendants of this Thomas. He may have married the third time, but I have no data on his supposed third marriage.

Isaac Thomas Jr. practiced Law in Louisiana and became a large land owner in the Alexandria region and a sugar planter; it is said that he was a very wealthy man when he died in 1859. It seems that the Flint family, his second wife's people inherited his large estate. That he was a prominent man in the Louisiana is shown by the following statement from the Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1927: "was the first man to introduce the cultivation of sugar cane in central Louisiana; also engaged in mercantile pursuits and in the operation of saw mills and steamboats; served as brigadier general of the Louisiana Militia; served in the State Senate, 1823-1827; moved to California in 1849; returned to Alexandria, Louisiana; where he died February 2, 1859; interment in the Flint lot in Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, Louisiana.."

In the congressional Directory quoted above it also stated that Isaac Thomas Jr. was born in "Sevierville, Tennessee, March 4, 1784," but I have found a conflict with this date; when he filed for bounty land which his service as a soldier in the War of 1812 entitled him to, he made application from New Orleans, 5 April 1851, and stated that he was 59 years old at that time. This would make the date of his birth, 1792, rather than 1784. I am at a loss to explain this discrepancy. I would like to know the source of the date, 1784, given in the Directory; this must be the correct date, because if he was born in 1792 he would have been too young to serve in Congress in 1815. Does the Bible Record in your possession have the date of the births of John Thomas' brothers and sisters?

Represented Maury County, Tennessee, in the legislature of 1825-27. He was sent as minister to England. The silver watch he sent nephew Isaac Thomas Douthitt is still possessed by descendants. Later he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas. A letter in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth Douthitt Ghermly or Ghormly, Lenior City Tennessee, was written by her grandfather, Isaac Thomas Douthitt while on his way to Mexican border, and he stated that he passed within 90 miles of the home of his uncle Isaac Thomas but did not have time to visit him. Another document shows that Isaac Thomas advanced money to her grandfather who was sick in the Mexican War. The records of the War of 1812 show that Isaac Thomas and son Isaac Jr. had active service in this war."

4National Archives, Sharp, J.A. - research (microfilm), 21 Aug 1953, McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee. "NATIONAL ARCHIVES -- Microfilm Copies, Correspondence regarding appointment of General Isaac Thomas to U.S. Consulship at Havana, Cuba, 1841, and appointment to Federal Judgeship in California, 1850. This Microfilm strip was given to McClung Room, Lawson McGhee Library, Knoxville, Tennessee.

New Orleans, Jany 10, 1841 -- Gen. Isaac Thomas to Pres. Wm. H. Harrison - Dear Sir- Presuming on slight acquaintance we formed when members of Congress - "(you from Ohio and me from Tennessee) in Sessions 15, 16 & 17 and acquaintance and friendship between you and Mr. Flint my wife's father." Altho my general health has been and now good- have been for several years afflicted "with Rheumatism." My medical friends advise a residence of a few years in Cuba as likely means restoring me. Would like appointment as consul in Havana if office becomes vacant - feels he could discharge office with "credit to my country."
Your obt Servt
I Thomas

A W. Roman(Governor) to Hon E.D. White- New Orleans, Feb. 15, 1841 - Gen Isaac Thomas informs me he is applicant consul at Havana. "The great commercial intercourse between this City and the Island of Cuba" makes it important to interests of Louisiana that someone acquainted with those interests be appointed. Gen. Thomas- "his character and his services" qualify him. You know he is fully competent.

R. Gant land of Sanland (?) of Louisiana to Pres. Harrison - Washington - March 6, l840 ? (1841) ? - Enclosed is letter recommending General Isaac Thomas of Parish Rapides, Louisiana. I submit his name for consul at Havana - "highest character, talent, moral worth and business qualifications." 1816-17 represented a District in Tennessee in Congress and since he removed to Louisiana has been elected several tines as member of State Senate. No man is better entitled to your confidence and hope you nominate him to the Senate. "I have presented Mr. Webster with various testimonials in favor of Gen Thomas, as well other Gentlemen,.... He is also personally acquainted with you."

I. Thomas to Z. Taylor - New Orleans, Feb. 13, 1850 - D Sir - Impression here that California will be admitted to Union this Session of Congress - In that event "I should have no objection to wear the ermine of Federal Judiciary in the new State, if suitable provision is made to sustain the dignity of the bench in that golden region." From message of Governor appears probable that California will adopt "body of the laws of this State, my long practice under them may be something of a recommendation." He said he had perhaps infringed upon etiquette and presumed too far on our acquaintance in thus addressing you directly. Had been induced to do so for three reasons. l-Wrote you about period of your inauguration and now have reason to believe my letter did not reach you. 2-Have no personal or political friends in Washington to make know my wishes. 3-Now engaged in professional pursuits here which would be seriously affected by visiting abroad.  Altho without personal political friends in Washington there are those there - "Our members of Congress" to whom my legal qualifications are known and who would I presume bear testimony to them if necessary. "Here I am not without numerous ardent and devoted personal and political friends."

Logan Huston ? to Z. Taylor, Pres. U.S. New Orleans April 11, 1850 - Believes laws of U.S. will be extended over California soon - presents name of Gen Isaac Thomas of Alexandria, La. for judge in that distant region. Gen Thomas is personally known to you - regarded as "one of the soundest lawyers in this State." He has "great energy, ripe and mature intellect, and his knowledge of the Spanish laws and usages eminently qualify him for the office." His numberous friends here would regret his loss, but would be pleased if his wishes were gratified."

Alfred ? to Genl Z. Taylor, Pres. of U.S. - New Orleans 1 May 1850 - Recommended Thomas for California judgeship - "he has practiced law in this State for more than thirty years."

P.A. Rost to Z. Taylor, Pres of U.S. - New Orleans June 7, 1850 -"You have lived too long in Louisiana not to be familiar with the name and reputation of Gen Thomas." Thirty years I ago he had no superior before Bar of the western district of this State. He has improved ever since just as you have. Has a thorough knowledge of laws of Spain in relation to succession and land titles. "Your son has bought plantation in sight of nine. I hope he will be neighborly."

J.P. Benjamin to Hon. John M. Clayton - New Orleans 12 June 1850 - old and valued friend Gen Isaac Thomas." He said Thomas to visit Washington and present his claims and his letter was an introduction for Thomas. "Impossible to find a gentleman more highly gifted." Mentioned Thomas "old and intimate with Civil Law, with the Spanish and French jurisprudence, and with those languages, adapt him singularly to fulfil the duties of a judge in a territory of a state like California."  His "personal character is above the very shadow of suspicion." Trust you can aid him."


Judge John Henry Summerville Thomas

1Sharp, J.A. - letter, 21 Aug 1953, Mason, T. "Letter to Mrs. Charles L. Adams of Dallas Texas:
John Thomas was a justice of the peace in this County before migrating with his family to Arkansas about 1833; from Arkansas he continued westward to the Dallas, Texas, region, about 1844 and was the first white man to settle in Dallas. Apparently he had nine children, all of whom were born in Sevier County. I have a newspaper article clipped from the Dallas Morning News, Sept. 11, 1949, which stated that he had nine children and an adopted son, Nicholas Houx. Do you know anything about this adopted son? Could this name have been Houk? We had people by the latter name in this County.

When John Thomas filed for a pension for his services in the War of 1812 he filed from Dallas County, Texas, 29 May 1872, and gave his age as 79 at that time. Does your Bible Record show the date of his birth? His wife's name was Hanna Andes, and he stated he married her in Sevier County, 12 Jan. 1815. Do you know anything about this Andes family? Was her father named Peter Andes? John Thomas described his military service as follows in his application for a pension: "he first went to Fort Armstrong on the Coosa river in the Cherokee Nation, that he went into the Creek Nation with General White to fight the Indians at the Hillily towns, in 12 miles of the Horseshoe; there were several Indians killed at this place." His company was called "mounted riflemen", and his captain was William Mitchell, early settler of Sevier County. His brother, Ellis Thomas, served as sergeant of the same company; in fact the entire company was Sevier County men."