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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Major Spencer Morgan

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 273, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "In 1770 Spencer Morgan, with consent of his mother, Elizabeth Mauzy (D. B. 3, p. 545) apprenticed himself until 21 to Thomas Hathway, saddler. On Oct. 14, 1780, Spencer gave bond to marry Susanna Kenner, and in 1783 (D. B. 8, p. 38) they conveyed to Gavin Lawson 143 acres, part of the 173 acres that had belonged to James Morgan, "father of said Spencer." This tract appears in the Prince William Quit Rent Rolls for 1753 as belonging to James with the notation: "Given by his father Charles Morgan, Sr." Besides Spencer and Elizabeth, we have record of no other children of James."

2John K. Gett, Virginia, Fauquier County 1759-1854 Marriage Bonds, pp.142-143.


Susanna Kenner

1John K. Gett, Virginia, Fauquier County 1759-1854 Marriage Bonds, pp.142-143.

2Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 273, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "In 1770 Spencer Morgan, with consent of his mother, Elizabeth Mauzy (D. B. 3, p. 545) apprenticed himself until 21 to Thomas Hathway, saddler. On Oct. 14, 1780, Spencer gave bond to marry Susanna Kenner, and in 1783 (D. B. 8, p. 38) they conveyed to Gavin Lawson 143 acres, part of the 173 acres that had belonged to James Morgan, "father of said Spencer." This tract appears in the Prince William Quit Rent Rolls for 1753 as belonging to James with the notation: "Given by his father Charles Morgan, Sr." Besides Spencer and Elizabeth, we have record of no other children of James."


Major Spencer Morgan

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 273, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "In 1770 Spencer Morgan, with consent of his mother, Elizabeth Mauzy (D. B. 3, p. 545) apprenticed himself until 21 to Thomas Hathway, saddler. On Oct. 14, 1780, Spencer gave bond to marry Susanna Kenner, and in 1783 (D. B. 8, p. 38) they conveyed to Gavin Lawson 143 acres, part of the 173 acres that had belonged to James Morgan, "father of said Spencer." This tract appears in the Prince William Quit Rent Rolls for 1753 as belonging to James with the notation: "Given by his father Charles Morgan, Sr." Besides Spencer and Elizabeth, we have record of no other children of James."


Frances Dawkins Nuckolls

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 273, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "In 1770 Spencer Morgan, with consent of his mother, Elizabeth Mauzy (D. B. 3, p. 545) apprenticed himself until 21 to Thomas Hathway, saddler. On Oct. 14, 1780, Spencer gave bond to marry Susanna Kenner, and in 1783 (D. B. 8, p. 38) they conveyed to Gavin Lawson 143 acres, part of the 173 acres that had belonged to James Morgan, "father of said Spencer." This tract appears in the Prince William Quit Rent Rolls for 1753 as belonging to James with the notation: "Given by his father Charles Morgan, Sr." Besides Spencer and Elizabeth, we have record of no other children of James."


Charles Morgan

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "In regard to William's son Charles, we have more data.
In Shenandoah Co. Records, D. B. C, p. 190, Aug. 26, 1779, Chas Morgan and Susanna, his wife, of Fauquier conveyed to Michael Keppel of "Shennando" for 1,100 pounds current money 430 acres granted to Williams Morgan, father of said Charles.

In 1771 (Fauquier D. B. 4, p. 378), Charles received from Lord Fairfax a grant of 197 acres effective for the lives of the said Charles, Sukey his wife and Elizabeth his daughter.

In 1783 (Ky. State Hist. Reg., vol. 30, p. 82) Jacob Fishback and Charles Morgan took up 40,000 acres in Kentucky and in 1800, Charles with wife Susanna of Campbell Co., KY., and Jacob Fishback with wife Phoebe of Clark Co., Ky. sold 35,570 acres of this tract to Humphry Marshall. Jacob Fishback was born April 14, 1749, died Sept. 14, 1821, while Phoebe was born Sept. 15, 1751, died Aug. 16, 1837 (Ibid., vol. 6, p. 48), Jillson's "Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds" list many tracts of land taken up either jointly or separately by Charles Morgan and Jacob Fishback. Charles Morgan was at Strode's Station in Kentucky in 1783. (Ardery's "Ky. Rec.," vol. 2, p. 113.) In line with this is a bond (Fauquier D. B. 8, p. 137) dated Sept. 1, 1783, from Charles Morgan of Fauquier to Thomas Massey to secure for the said Massey 614 acres of good land in Kentucky, "the land shall be as good as the land on Shenandoah River at Joseph Berry's landing."

From Burgess's "Virginia Soldiers of 1776," pp. 218 and 841, we learn that Charles Morgan's wife was the daughter of Bushrod Doggett and sister of Capt. Richard Doggett, a Revolutionary soldier, and that Charles was the eldest brother of John Morgan who entered the army Dec. 16, 1776, and served until his death. John Morgan was "killed in battle or died in the Siege of Quebec." Charles Morgan died testate in Muhlenburg Co., Ky., in 1822, leaving several children, Willis being the oldest son."

Continued on the record of Simon, the son of Charles and Ann Morgan.

2Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274. "In Shenandoah Co. Records, D. B. C, p. 190, Aug. 26, 1779, Chas Morgan and Susanna, his wife, of Fauquier conveyed to Michael Keppel of "Shennando" for 1,100 pounds current money 430 acres granted to Williams Morgan, father of said Charles. In 1771 (Fauquier D. B. 4, p. 378), Charles received from Lord Fairfax a grant of 197 acres effective for the lives of the said Charles, Sukey his wife and Elizabeth his daughter. ...

In 1783 (Ky. State Hist. Reg., vol. 30, p. 82) Jacob Fishback and Charles Morgan took up 40,000 acres in Kentucky and in 1800, Charles with wife Susanna of Campbell Co., KY., and Jacob Fishback with wife Phoebe¢ of Clark Co., Ky. sold 35,570 acres of this tract to Humphry Marshall. ...

From Burgess's "Virginia Soldiers of 1776," pp. 218 and 841, we learn that Charles Morgan's wife was the daughter of Bushrod Doggett and sister of Capt. Richard Doggett, a Revolutionary soldier, ..."

3Kentucky Probate Records, 1727-1990, Will records, 1814-1829, Vol. 2, image 108 . "193 C. Morgans Will

I Charles Morgan of Muhlenberg County and State of Kentucky being in good health and sound mind but well understanding the certainty of death Do make and ordain this my last will and Testament as followeth.

Tourt
My will and desire is that all my Just debts be faithfully paid out of the debts due to me of judgements obtained in my name and for my benefit of Sales of lands made and may yet be made by my several agents. But in case a sufficiency cannot be procured in good time out of the above described means then to make sale of some of my most Saleable lands in the upper counties which my agents can point out.

I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Morton during her life time then to be the property of her heirs equally Five hundred acres of land the 200 acres which I purchased of John Hopkins and assigned to her And the 200 acres that I purchased of Matthew Williams to be apart. The other 100 acres to be taken off the most Southward part of George Lovelaces additional claim with 500 acres of land is to be apart of her portion of lands. Also my negro woman Phyllis and her future increase.

Whereas I give unto my daughter Anne Morehead decd a negro woman named Sall and her increase and by agreement with Armistead Morehead all their children and provided for in negroes except their son Charles and Alfred.

I therefore give and bequeath unto said Charles and Alfred four hundred dollars worth of land each to be as conveniently situated as cases will admit of which land is to be considered as apart of their mothers portion of lands.

I give and bequeath to my son Willis my negro man named Simon which with the 400 acres of land which I transfered to him lying near to Russelville I consider to be sufficient for his Share of negroes.

I give and bequeath to my son John my negro man James which with my negro man Allen that I gave to him. I consider sufficient for his portion of negroes. And for the use of money that I could not make it convenient to pay to him in due time. And for Services rendered I give to him my waggon and hind gear. Also the following boundary
pg 194
of land (towit) Beginning on Pondriver at such a distance above John Littlepages corner in Eppes Littlepage line that to run parallel to said Eppes Littlepages line will include to John Morgan one pole west from the mouth of the Spring branch which Spring is convenient to the Cabin that Stephen Downing and also Frances Heard lived in and to continue said line to a line of George Lovelace's Survey. Also another Slipe of land to begin at the corner to be made in George Lovelases line.

I give and bequeath to my daughter Rosannah for her to use possess and enjoy during her natural life then to descend and be the property of all her children. My negro woman named Hannah and her increase also my negro boy named Reuben. Also the house and adjacent buildings where I am now living together with so much land as will amount to half the valuation of the connexion of claims on which I am now living after the 500 acres is laid off to Elizabeth Morton and the 2 small pieces to John Morgan also first choice of my horse kind also 3 cows and calves & sheep and sow and pigs the bed and furniture which her mother gave to her and what in bedding and furniture which she hath procured by her own industry also so much of other household and kitchen furniture as the other children was furnished with when they commenced housekeeping. Also choice of bee hives.

I give and bequeath to my daughter Lucinda my negro woman named Charlotte and her increase. Also my negro girl named Sylvia and her increase also so much land as will amount  to half the valuation of the connexion of claims on which I am now living after the 500 acres is laid off to Elizabeth Morton and the 2 small pieces to John Morgan I do direct that Rosanah & Lucinda by their representatives William Tapp and Baxter D. Townes endeavour to divide said land and if they cannot agree then I appoint John Morgan, Col William Martin William Oates Esqr James Irvin, Esqr Charles Summers and Valentine Whitmer or any three of them to make the division. Also six head of sheep because she hath not had any sheep or hogs.

And beit understood that the lands bequeathed to my daughters Elizabeth Rosannah and Lucinda is to be considered as appoint
pg 195
of their portion of lands. I do direct that all my moveable property that is not bequeathed be sold on a reasonable credit. That collections be made on the judgments obtained suits at issue monies due to me and to become due sales of land made and to be made by my agents William Sudouth Fielding Bradford Humphrey Marshall William Mountjoy William P. Fleming Achiller Sneed Thomas Triplett and Benjamin S. Chambers with part of which to pay all my just debts and then pattent my land claims.

Whereas my son William when a youth by imprudence destroyed his constitution which produced the nervous affliction and rendered him incapable of managing for himself. My will and desire that it be contrived that he return to this qurter again. And that he be boarded with some person in good circumstances and of good character with whom he would be satisfied to live with And that he be furnished with good clothing which boarding and clothing to be paid for out of my estate and in particular of the property to be sold. And the collections to be made as above stated. And should he incline to work at his trade that he be furnished with suitable tools to have the use of them so long as he will or can use them. And what he shall earn by his labour not to go toward his boarding or clothing.

And my will and desire is that my lands and money to be collected that is not herein disposed of be equally and equitable divided among all my children that the four children owned by my son William be entitled to his share. And the children of my daughter Anne Morehead decd be entitled to her share. In Testimony where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this    day of   1822.
                           Charles Morgan  (Seal)
Be it remembered and hereby understood that since signing the avove described will I sold my negro woman Charlotte to Baxter D. Townes and received payment therefore as an equivalent. Therefore I give and bequeath to my daughter Lucinda
pg 196
Lucinda 200 acres of land being in Livingston county on the waters of the pigeon roost fork. Allowing her the privilege of making choice of the claim granted to John Dickey or John Steele to enjoy it during her lifetime then to be the property of her children. I do hereby appoint my son John and Baxter D. Townes Executors of this my last will and testament. In Testimony whereof I have again set my hand and seal this 18th day of March 1822.
Signed Sealed and acknowledged ))) Charles Morgan (Seal) in presents of
Will D. Allison
Will Pollard
Chet Wichliffe
John Byrd
Wm Bell

Muhlenberg County Sct
                  July County Court 1822
The foregoing last will and testament of Charles Morgan Descsd was exhibited into court by the exector therein named and proven by the oaths of Will Pollard Charles Wichliffe and Jno Byrd subscribed witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.
                  (att) xxxxx." Muhlenberg County, Kentucky Will Book 2:193-195, Will records, 1814-1829, Vol. 2, image 108 .

Transcription by T.Mason. Image.


Susanna Doggett

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "In Shenandoah Co. Records, D. B. C, p. 190, Aug. 26, 1779, Chas Morgan and Susanna, his wife, of Fauquier conveyed to Michael Keppel of "Shennando" for 1,100 pounds current money 430 acres granted to Williams Morgan, father of said Charles. In 1771 (Fauquier D. B. 4, p. 378), Charles received from Lord Fairfax a grant of 197 acres effective for the lives of the said Charles, Sukey his wife and Elizabeth his daughter. ...

In 1783 (Ky. State Hist. Reg., vol. 30, p. 82) Jacob Fishback and Charles Morgan took up 40,000 acres in Kentucky and in 1800, Charles with wife Susanna of Campbell Co., KY., and Jacob Fishback with wife Phoebe¢ of Clark Co., Ky. sold 35,570 acres of this tract to Humphry Marshall. ...

From Burgess's "Virginia Soldiers of 1776," pp. 218 and 841, we learn that Charles Morgan's wife was the daughter of Bushrod Doggett and sister of Capt. Richard Doggett, a Revolutionary soldier, ..."

2Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274. "In regard to William's son Charles, we have more data.
In Shenandoah Co. Records, D. B. C, p. 190, Aug. 26, 1779, Chas Morgan and Susanna, his wife, of Fauquier conveyed to Michael Keppel of "Shennando" for 1,100 pounds current money 430 acres granted to Williams Morgan, father of said Charles.

In 1771 (Fauquier D. B. 4, p. 378), Charles received from Lord Fairfax a grant of 197 acres effective for the lives of the said Charles, Sukey his wife and Elizabeth his daughter.

In 1783 (Ky. State Hist. Reg., vol. 30, p. 82) Jacob Fishback and Charles Morgan took up 40,000 acres in Kentucky and in 1800, Charles with wife Susanna of Campbell Co., KY., and Jacob Fishback with wife Phoebe of Clark Co., Ky. sold 35,570 acres of this tract to Humphry Marshall. Jacob Fishback was born April 14, 1749, died Sept. 14, 1821, while Phoebe was born Sept. 15, 1751, died Aug. 16, 1837 (Ibid., vol. 6, p. 48), Jillson's "Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds" list many tracts of land taken up either jointly or separately by Charles Morgan and Jacob Fishback. Charles Morgan was at Strode's Station in Kentucky in 1783. (Ardery's "Ky. Rec.," vol. 2, p. 113.) In line with this is a bond (Fauquier D. B. 8, p. 137) dated Sept. 1, 1783, from Charles Morgan of Fauquier to Thomas Massey to secure for the said Massey 614 acres of good land in Kentucky, "the land shall be as good as the land on Shenandoah River at Joseph Berry's landing."

From Burgess's "Virginia Soldiers of 1776," pp. 218 and 841, we learn that Charles Morgan's wife was the daughter of Bushrod Doggett and sister of Capt. Richard Doggett, a Revolutionary soldier, and that Charles was the eldest brother of John Morgan who entered the army Dec. 16, 1776, and served until his death. John Morgan was "killed in battle or died in the Siege of Quebec." Charles Morgan died testate in Muhlenburg Co., Ky., in 1822, leaving several children, Willis being the oldest son."

Continued on the record of Simon, the son of Charles and Ann Morgan.


Willis Morgan

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "... Charles Morgan died testate in Muhlenburg Co., Ky., in 1822, leaving several children, Willis being the oldest son."

2Kentucky Probate Records, 1727-1990, Will records, 1814-1829, Vol. 2, image 108 . "pg 193 Charles Morgan
...
I give and bequeath to my son Willis my negro man named Simon which with the 400 acres of land which I transfered to him lying near to Russelville I consider to be sufficient for his Share of negroes."


William Morgan

1Kentucky Probate Records, 1727-1990, Will records, 1814-1829, Vol. 2, image 108 . "pg 195 Charles Morgan...
Whereas my son William when a youth by imprudence destroyed his constitution which produced the nervous affliction and rendered him incapable of managing for himself. My will and desire that it be contrived that he return to this qurter again. And that he be boarded with some person in good circumstances and of good character with whom he would be satisfied to live with And that he be furnished with good clothing which boarding and clothing to be paid for out of my estate and in particular of the property to be sold. And the collections to be made as above stated. And should he incline to work at his trade that he be furnished with suitable tools to have the use of them so long as he will or can use them. And what he shall earn by his labour not to go toward his boarding or clothing.

And my will and desire is that my lands and money to be collected that is not herein disposed of be equally and equitable divided among all my children that the four children owned by my son William be entitled to his share. And the children of my daughter Anne Morehead decd be entitled to her share. In Testimony where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this    day of   1822."


Lucinda Morgan

1Kentucky Probate Records, 1727-1990, Will records, 1814-1829, Vol. 2, image 108 . "pg 194 Charles Morgan...

I give and bequeath to my daughter Lucinda my negro woman named Charlotte and her increase. Also my negro girl named Sylvia and her increase also so much land as will amount  to half the valuation of the connexion of claims on which I am now living after the 500 acres is laid off to Elizabeth Morton and the 2 small pieces to John Morgan I do direct that Rosanah & Lucinda by their representatives William Tapp and Baxter D. Townes endeavour to divide said land and if they cannot agree then I appoint John Morgan, Col William Martin William Oates Esqr James Irvin, Esqr Charles Summers and Valentine Whitmer or any three of them to make the division. Also six head of sheep because she hath not had any sheep or hogs.

And beit understood that the lands bequeathed to my daughters Elizabeth Rosannah and Lucinda is to be considered as appoint
pg 195
of their portion of lands. I do direct that all my moveable property that is not bequeathed be sold on a reasonable credit. That collections be made on the judgments obtained suits at issue monies due to me and to become due sales of land made and to be made by my agents William Sudouth Fielding Bradford Humphrey Marshall William Mountjoy William P. Fleming Achiller Sneed Thomas Triplett and Benjamin S. Chambers with part of which to pay all my just debts and then pattent my land claims.

Be it remembered and hereby understood that since signing the avove described will I sold my negro woman Charlotte to Baxter D. Townes and received payment therefore as an equivalent. Therefore I give and bequeath to my daughter Lucinda
pg 196
Lucinda 200 acres of land being in Livingston county on the waters of the pigeon roost fork. Allowing her the privilege of making choice of the claim granted to John Dickey or John Steele to enjoy it during her lifetime then to be the property of her children. I do hereby appoint my son John and Baxter D. Townes Executors of this my last will and testament. In Testimony whereof I have again set my hand and seal this 18th day of March 1822."


George Settle

1Reese, William Emmett. Edited and published by Fannie Lu Camp Fisher, Settle-Suttle family, The, Carrollton, Georgia : Fisher, c1974, Pages 156-161, FHC 929.273 Se78a. "EXTRACTS: George Settle (No. 52), son of Isaac and Charity (Browne) Settle, was born in King George Co., VA, circa 1735 (settlement of the estate of Isaac Settle, Sr., Prince William Co., VA. George Settle was a minor in 1752); he died testate on Buck Creek, Warren (now Barren) Co., KY, June, 1820 (Will of George Settle, dated 20 May 1820, probated in the July Court, 1820; Will Book B, p. 310, Warren Co., KY), and was buried near his home.

He married in Fauquier Co., VA, circa 1762, Mary Morgan (Will of William Morgan, Lincoln Co., KY, Book B, page 191), eldest daughter of William Morgan and his first wife, Mary, daughter of John Duncan. William Morgan, son of Charles Morgan Sr., died in Lincoln Co., KY, 1797 (Tyler's Quarterly and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 25, pages 270-276; also see will of William Morgan). Mary (Morgan) Settle, wife of George Settle, was born in VA, circa 1736, and died in Fauquier Co., VA.

George Settle, a minor at the death of his father, Isaac Settle, in 1752, was under the guardianship of his brother, Joseph, by Court Order (Order Book 1754-55, page 133, Prince William Co., VA). Joseph and Isaac Settle, Jr., were executors under their father's will (Order Book 1754-55, pages 108-109, Prince William Co., VA). Within a few years after his father's death, Joseph owned title to the entire 370 acres granted by Thomas Lord Fairfax to his father in 1742 (Northern Neck Index, Book E, page 162, Fauquier Co., VA). Existing records do not reveal how this came about, since the will of Isaac Settle and most of the early land records of Prince William Co., VA, are missing. It is possible that he obtained title under the terms of the missing will, or, more probably he bought the interests of the other devisees thereunder before Fauquier Co., VA, was formed in 1759 from Prince William Co. If this were the case, the Prince William Co. deeds involved would be among the missing land records of that Co. George Settle eventually acquired the total acreage of the 1742 grant to his father. In 1760 (Deed Book 1, pages 56-63, Fauquier Co., VA), he purchased two tracts, each containing 153 acres from his brother Joseph. The grant in each case states that the land was a part of the grant from Lord Fairfax to Isaac Settle in 1742. A third tract, containing 135 acres, was purchased in 1768 (Deed Book 3, page 212, Fauquier Co., VA) from his first cousin, Benjamin Settle, who had purchased it from Joseph Settle, and is described as being the land whereon Joseph Settle formerly lived.

George Settle was a planter, slaveholder and a man of broad business interests. He operated a water-powered grain mill and sawmill, a distillery, and traded extensively in horses and cattle. He lived on the old Isaac Settle grant for some 65 years. Here his family of nine children was born and reared, and his wife died. Three of his sons, Charles, Simon and Isaac were educated as doctors.

In 1767 (Deed Book 3, page 334, Fauquier Co., VA), he received a grant from Lord Fairfax of 200 acres, "for and during the life of him the said George Settle and for and during the natural life of Mary his wife and Thomas his son". This tract was sold to Thomas Pope 26 September 1768 (Deed Book 3, page 334, Fauquier Co., VA). On 1 November 1771 (Deed Book 4, page 409, Fauquier Co., VA), he received a second grant from Lord Fairfax of 134 acres, in which his wife Mary, and son William are named.
At a Fauquier Co. Court held 26 March 1782 (Minute Book 1795 - 1797 Court held 26 March 1782 [Not indexed and no pagination], Fauquier Co., VA), "The Court proceeded to receive Claims against the Common Wealth for articles impressed for the use of the public
as follows to wit:
William Settle 375
George Settle 300
Vincent Garner 200
William Morgan 1075
John Jones 400
William Morgan 600

As early as 1785 (Kentucky Grants, Book 5, age. 21, Kentucky Land Office, Frankfort, KY - George Settle (Thomas Brown associate), granted 2,000 acres in Fayette Co. on ". . . small waters running into the Ohio River...", 20 June 1785), George Settle had started acquiring land in Kentucky and, as later developments indicate, most probably intended eventually to establish his second home there. His son William had gone to Barren County, Kentucky, in 1798 and had established his home on Skaggs Creek.

On 22 October 1804 (Deed Book 15, page 689, Fauquier Co., VA), George Settle of Fauquier Co., VA, executed a deed of gift to 300 acres of land in Barren Co., KY, to three of his sons, Isaac, Simon and Charles Settle.

Dr. Isaac Settle appears to have visited KY in 1820, but there is no evidence that he ever lived there. Various deeds and other recorded evidence in Fauquier Co., VA, clearly establish the fact that he returned to Paris, VA, and continued to live there. On 6 October 1806 (Deed Book 16, page 524, Fauquier Co., VA), Isaac Settle for a monetary consideration quit-claimed and relinquished to his father, George Settle, the 117 acres that he had received in Barren Co., KY.

The last land sale of record in Fauquier Co., VA, by George Settle, was by deed dated 11 December 1806(Deed Book 16, pages 696-698, Fauquier Co., VA), to John M. and Edward Settle, conveying two adjoining tracts of land in Fauquier Co., containing 285 acres. A recorded deed of trust, dated 27 February 1807 (Deed Book 16, pages 724-727, Fauquier Co., VA), secured to George Settle the purchase money as it became due over a period of five years. The boundary description of the 285 acres identifies it as a portion of the original 370-acre grant from Lord Fairfax to Isaac Settle, Sr., in 1742.

Of the sons of George and Mary (Morgan) Settle, Thomas had come to KY in or prior to 1780; William and John Morgan Settle had gone there in 1798. Simon arrived about 1802. In 1808 or shortly thereafter George Settle in company with his son Charles, daughter Mary and her husband, Elijah P. Smith, and family; daughter Hannah and husband, William Willis, and family, with their slaves, baggage and equipment, came to Barren Co., KY. He gave to each of his children, both sons and daughters, a good farm in KY.

In the extreme Eastern part of Warren Co., on Buck Creek, George Settle and his youngest son, Charles, who was not married at the time, cleared a plantation and built a brick house. The house commanded an excellent view of the Buck Creek Valley. At the head of Buck Creek he erected a stone mill house, powered by an overshot waterwheel. Here he farmed and raised cattle and horses until his death in June, 1820.

In 1812 (Deed Book 18, pages 304-305, Fauquier Co., VA), eight years before his death, George Settle of Barren Co., KY, executed a deed of release to John M. and Edward Settle of Fauquier Co., VA, acknowledging payment in full of the agreed purchase price of the old home place in Fauquier Co., VA, known as "The Cottage". By deed dated 5 October 1819 (Deed Book 23, pages 328-329, Fauquier Co., VA), this place was sold to Richard Harvey, son-in-law of Edward and Roseanna (Morgan) Settle; later it passed out of the hands of the Settle family. It was owned successively by Marshall Smith, Thomas Seddon, Sarah W. Gillison (Deed Book 27, 1823-24, pages 160, 161; Deed Book 30, 1828-30, page 287, Fauquier Co., VA), the Beale family, and in 1867 it was purchased by Lewis F. Weber. The Webers were musicians and Lewis Weber and his sons conducted an orchestra at nearby Fauquier White Sulphur Springs. It was next owned by J. W. Golden, who sold it to J. Temple Gwathmey, a Virginian and a prominent financier and sportsman. He built a handsome semi-colonial residence and named it Canterbury after his family estate in King and Queen Co. He also built a large horse stable for his thoroughbreds and the necessary outbuildings. Mr. Gwathmey's residence burned and the estate was sold to Joshua Cosden, a businessman from New York, who built a race track and barn and a 100 stall stable. Colonel Albert E. Peirce was the next owner, who built the present residence and swimming pool. For many years it was a show place. In 1941 Mr. and Mrs. Leon Cotnareanu of New York and Paris purchased the estate and named it Le Baron. The Cotnareanus visited Le Baron at intervals and entertained extensively. In 1972 "Le Baron" was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. George W. Offutt, who have reinstated the old name "Canterbury". They have disposed of the additional acreage that had been added to the estate on the Culpeper side of the Rappahannock River, retaining only about 500 acres for grazing. "The Cottage", which was built by George Settle in a grove of beautiful old trees, still retains its beauty and charm. It has been used by the different owners, from time to time, as a guest house and for offices. It has a long living room and a wing containing a dining room and a den or study. Three bedrooms are located on the second floor ('Canterbury' Soon Will Know Former Charm, M. Louise Evans, The Fauquier Democrat, Warrenton, VA, 1962).

It required courage and a high degree of initiative for a man seventy-five years of age to sell his ancestral plantation in VA, turn his back on lifetime friends, leave behind the comforts of civilization, and plunge into the wilderness of KY to start anew the clearing of virgin forests, building and planting. This record of George Settle is a good example of the forward looking pioneer spirit that opened up the frontier areas of America.

The will of George Settle, dated 20 May 1820, probated in the July Court, 1820 (Will Book B, page 310, Warren Co., KY), Warren Co., KY, was witnessed by Argible Lawrence and William Willis. Under the terms of the will son, Charles, received 100 acres of land "bought of Daniel Weathers" and "also the twenty acres that I bought of John Mayfield sons [NOTE: I have a copy of the will and I read it as John Mayfield Senr], with the grist mill that is now on it..." Daughter "Molly Smith to have the land that she now lives on, which land I purchased of John Marr ... The balance of my land and other property to be sold and divided in the following manner, That is my son Thomas Settle deceased, his heirs to have fifty dollars extra and then the balance of my estate to be equally divided between my son Thomas Settle deceased, his heirs, and my daughter Hannah Willis, deceased and the heirs of her body, my daughter Betsey Young and the heirs of her body; my son William Settle deceased and his heirs, my daughter Molly Smith and the heirs of her body, my son J. M. Settle, my son Isaac Settle and my son Simon Settle." Executors named were Daniel Daughtry, George Russell and John Beckham.
The sale of the estate of George Settle, deceased, was held on three successive days, August 31, September 1-2, as reported by the Executors to a Court held for Warren Co., KY, October, 1820 (Will Book B, pages 330-334, Warren Co., KY). This sale is interesting in that it shows that all of the slaves were acquired by members of the family and it establishes with reasonable certainty that son Isaac Settle of Fauquier Co., VA, was present. He acquired a slave boy named Noah, a bay mare and a lot of eight "hoggs". He no doubt sold the "hoggs" locally and returned to VA with Noah and the horse. Among the many scores of purchasers at the sale were: Robert Rasdall, Jonathan Manley, Gabriel G. Manley, Bartholomew Gunstead, John Cole, Andrew Christy, Simon Settle, Mary Smith, Walter Lawrence, Jesse Morris, James Mathews, John Dickenson, William Sneed, James Rogers, James Gillax, Nelson Landrum, Valentine Dickerson, Jeremiah Lutrell, Joe Daughtry, Lawrey Bishop, Washington Smith, Thomas Wright, Franklin Settle, Ebaneza Ellis, Wm. Clayton, Pleasant Emmerson, Dana Rasdall, Cornelius Manley, Lewis Porter, Jos. A. Henderson, Wm. Wright, James J. Foster, Thomas Manley, Francis Willis, Charles Settle, Stephen Daughtry, Elizabeth Young, French Settle, William Willis, Nancy Willis, Robert Graham, Paul Shirley, Robert Jameson, Benjamin Gassoway, Thomas L. Morris, Wm. Stewart, Thomas Powell, Robert Lewis, Bond Wheeler, Benj. Boyston, Bartley Boyston, Joel Pickenson, Jas. Landrum, Michial Dillingham, Nimrod Young, David Gunnerly, Champ Carom, Jacob Gibson, James Cooney, Eba. Button, George Carter, Wm. Forester, John Emmerson, Benj. Carraway, David Shipman, John Beckham, Samuel Pullen, Elijah Smith, Jess Dalton, John McCoy, John Gains, John Cooney, Felix Settle, William Edmunds, Valentine Cosby, Benjamin Lutrell, Allen Moore, John Franklin, Nancy Button, Miner Lawrence, Chas. Lewis, David Shipman, Nat. Duff, Lucie Willis, Lewis Willis, and David Spillman.

All of his children were probably born in Fauquier Co., VA.

From: George Settle of Faquier Co VA
To: Simon Settle
Type: Power of attorney re deeds of 2 tracts of land in Barren Co.
Names Cited: Henry Vowles, Wm. Settle, Charles Morgan
Date: 29 June 1802
Source: Barren Co KY Deed Book B, p. 22.

From: Geo. Settle of Faquier Co VA
To: Wm. Settle of Barren Co KY
Type: Land on Skagg's Creek
Date: 17 Mar 1806
Source: Barren Co KY Deed Book B, p. 85.

Geo Settle paid to Isaac Smith, quit claim deed
Type: Land on Beaver Creek
Note: Recorded Fauquer Co VA 28 Feb 1803.
Source: Barren Co KY Deed Book B, p. 141.

Warren Co., KY - Will Book B, Page 310, July Court 1820
Will of GEORGE SETTLE. In the name of God Amen. I GEORGE SETTLE of Warren County and State of Kentucky being of perfect mind and memory make this my last Will and Testament. First I desire to be buried in a decent Christian like manner. My temporal Estate I bequeath and dispose of in the following manner, viz:

To my son CHARLES SETTLE I bequeath the tract of land that bought of DANIEL WEATHERS for one hundred acres be the same more or less also the twenty acres that I bought of JOHN MAYFIELD, SENR. with the Grist Mill that is now on it which tract of land I have made Deeds for to said CHARLES SETTLE, also one trunk, one Negro boy named Woodford, also one Negro girl named Catherine which is a child of Sonnys which girl is gave for the passing of the Balance of Sonny's Children and at my death Sonny and the balance of her children to be given up and sold with my other property that is to be sold. Also to my daughter MOLLY SMITH to have the land she now lives on, which land I purchased of JOHN MAN [NOTE: it looked like MAN in the will, but the Settle book shows it to be MARR.]. But it is to be understood that the land is to be valued by two?? or more disinterested persons and if valued to more than her equal part she must pay the surplus of the balance to the heirs, and if it is valued less than the value of her part, it is to be made up to her. The balance of my lands and other property to be sold and divided in the following manner. That is my son THOMAS SETTLE Deceased, his heirs to have fifty dollars extra, and then the balance of my estate to be equally divided Between my son THOMAS SETTLE deceased, his heirs, and my Daughter HANNAH WILLIS Deceased, the heirs of her body, my daughter BETSEY YOUNG and the heirs of her body, my son WILLIAM SETTLE Deceased his heirs, my daughter MOLLY SMITH, and the heirs of her body, my son J. M. SETTLE, my son ISAAC SETTLE, and my son SIMON SETTLE. I also wish and make choices of DANIEL DAUGHTRY, GEORGE RUSSELL and JOHN BECKHAM as executors to my estate whom I constitute and appoint as executors of this my last will and testament. I do hereby utterly revoke and dissolve all wills [NOTE: last line on page could not be read]

Page 311: heretofore made declaring and ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twentieth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty.

Signed sealed published and declared by the within Testator GEORGE SETTLE to be his last will and testament. In presence of us who subscribed our name in presence of the testator and of each other.
GEORGE SETTLE (Seal)
ARGIBLE LAWRENCE
WILLIAM (his X mark) WILLIS
Warren County - July County Court 1820 [NOTE: it REALLY looks like 1828]
The last will and testament of GEORGE SETTLE Deceased was produced in Court and proved by the oath of WILLIAM WILLIS and ARGIBLE LAWRENCE two of the subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the last will and testament of the said GEORGE SETTLE and ordered
to record.
Test. JON C. HOBSON, CC."


Mary Morgan

1Reese, William Emmett. Edited and published by Fannie Lu Camp Fisher, Settle-Suttle family, The, Carrollton, Georgia : Fisher, c1974, Pages 156-161, FHC 929.273 Se78a. "EXTRACTS: George Settle (No. 52), son of Isaac and Charity (Browne) Settle, was born in King George Co., VA, circa 1735 (settlement of the estate of Isaac Settle, Sr., Prince William Co., VA. George Settle was a minor in 1752); he died testate on Buck Creek, Warren (now Barren) Co., KY, June, 1820 (Will of George Settle, dated 20 May 1820, probated in the July Court, 1820; Will Book B, p. 310, Warren Co., KY), and was buried near his home.

He married in Fauquier Co., VA, circa 1762, Mary Morgan (Will of William Morgan, Lincoln Co., KY, Book B, page 191), eldest daughter of William Morgan and his first wife, Mary, daughter of John Duncan. William Morgan, son of Charles Morgan Sr., died in Lincoln Co., KY, 1797 (Tyler's Quarterly and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 25, pages 270-276; also see will of William Morgan). Mary (Morgan) Settle, wife of George Settle, was born in VA, circa 1736, and died in Fauquier Co., VA.

George Settle, a minor at the death of his father, Isaac Settle, in 1752, was under the guardianship of his brother, Joseph, by Court Order (Order Book 1754-55, page 133, Prince William Co., VA). Joseph and Isaac Settle, Jr., were executors under their father's will (Order Book 1754-55, pages 108-109, Prince William Co., VA). Within a few years after his father's death, Joseph owned title to the entire 370 acres granted by Thomas Lord Fairfax to his father in 1742 (Northern Neck Index, Book E, page 162, Fauquier Co., VA). Existing records do not reveal how this came about, since the will of Isaac Settle and most of the early land records of Prince William Co., VA, are missing. It is possible that he obtained title under the terms of the missing will, or, more probably he bought the interests of the other devisees thereunder before Fauquier Co., VA, was formed in 1759 from Prince William Co. If this were the case, the Prince William Co. deeds involved would be among the missing land records of that Co. George Settle eventually acquired the total acreage of the 1742 grant to his father. In 1760 (Deed Book 1, pages 56-63, Fauquier Co., VA), he purchased two tracts, each containing 153 acres from his brother Joseph. The grant in each case states that the land was a part of the grant from Lord Fairfax to Isaac Settle in 1742. A third tract, containing 135 acres, was purchased in 1768 (Deed Book 3, page 212, Fauquier Co., VA) from his first cousin, Benjamin Settle, who had purchased it from Joseph Settle, and is described as being the land whereon Joseph Settle formerly lived.

George Settle was a planter, slaveholder and a man of broad business interests. He operated a water-powered grain mill and sawmill, a distillery, and traded extensively in horses and cattle. He lived on the old Isaac Settle grant for some 65 years. Here his family of nine children was born and reared, and his wife died. Three of his sons, Charles, Simon and Isaac were educated as doctors.

In 1767 (Deed Book 3, page 334, Fauquier Co., VA), he received a grant from Lord Fairfax of 200 acres, "for and during the life of him the said George Settle and for and during the natural life of Mary his wife and Thomas his son". This tract was sold to Thomas Pope 26 September 1768 (Deed Book 3, page 334, Fauquier Co., VA). On 1 November 1771 (Deed Book 4, page 409, Fauquier Co., VA), he received a second grant from Lord Fairfax of 134 acres, in which his wife Mary, and son William are named.
At a Fauquier Co. Court held 26 March 1782 (Minute Book 1795 - 1797 Court held 26 March 1782 [Not indexed and no pagination], Fauquier Co., VA), "The Court proceeded to receive Claims against the Common Wealth for articles impressed for the use of the public
as follows to wit:
William Settle 375
George Settle 300
Vincent Garner 200
William Morgan 1075
John Jones 400
William Morgan 600

As early as 1785 (Kentucky Grants, Book 5, age. 21, Kentucky Land Office, Frankfort, KY - George Settle (Thomas Brown associate), granted 2,000 acres in Fayette Co. on ". . . small waters running into the Ohio River...", 20 June 1785), George Settle had started acquiring land in Kentucky and, as later developments indicate, most probably intended eventually to establish his second home there. His son William had gone to Barren County, Kentucky, in 1798 and had established his home on Skaggs Creek.

On 22 October 1804 (Deed Book 15, page 689, Fauquier Co., VA), George Settle of Fauquier Co., VA, executed a deed of gift to 300 acres of land in Barren Co., KY, to three of his sons, Isaac, Simon and Charles Settle.

Dr. Isaac Settle appears to have visited KY in 1820, but there is no evidence that he ever lived there. Various deeds and other recorded evidence in Fauquier Co., VA, clearly establish the fact that he returned to Paris, VA, and continued to live there. On 6 October 1806 (Deed Book 16, page 524, Fauquier Co., VA), Isaac Settle for a monetary consideration quit-claimed and relinquished to his father, George Settle, the 117 acres that he had received in Barren Co., KY.

The last land sale of record in Fauquier Co., VA, by George Settle, was by deed dated 11 December 1806(Deed Book 16, pages 696-698, Fauquier Co., VA), to John M. and Edward Settle, conveying two adjoining tracts of land in Fauquier Co., containing 285 acres. A recorded deed of trust, dated 27 February 1807 (Deed Book 16, pages 724-727, Fauquier Co., VA), secured to George Settle the purchase money as it became due over a period of five years. The boundary description of the 285 acres identifies it as a portion of the original 370-acre grant from Lord Fairfax to Isaac Settle, Sr., in 1742.

Of the sons of George and Mary (Morgan) Settle, Thomas had come to KY in or prior to 1780; William and John Morgan Settle had gone there in 1798. Simon arrived about 1802. In 1808 or shortly thereafter George Settle in company with his son Charles, daughter Mary and her husband, Elijah P. Smith, and family; daughter Hannah and husband, William Willis, and family, with their slaves, baggage and equipment, came to Barren Co., KY. He gave to each of his children, both sons and daughters, a good farm in KY.

In the extreme Eastern part of Warren Co., on Buck Creek, George Settle and his youngest son, Charles, who was not married at the time, cleared a plantation and built a brick house. The house commanded an excellent view of the Buck Creek Valley. At the head of Buck Creek he erected a stone mill house, powered by an overshot waterwheel. Here he farmed and raised cattle and horses until his death in June, 1820.

In 1812 (Deed Book 18, pages 304-305, Fauquier Co., VA), eight years before his death, George Settle of Barren Co., KY, executed a deed of release to John M. and Edward Settle of Fauquier Co., VA, acknowledging payment in full of the agreed purchase price of the old home place in Fauquier Co., VA, known as "The Cottage". By deed dated 5 October 1819 (Deed Book 23, pages 328-329, Fauquier Co., VA), this place was sold to Richard Harvey, son-in-law of Edward and Roseanna (Morgan) Settle; later it passed out of the hands of the Settle family. It was owned successively by Marshall Smith, Thomas Seddon, Sarah W. Gillison (Deed Book 27, 1823-24, pages 160, 161; Deed Book 30, 1828-30, page 287, Fauquier Co., VA), the Beale family, and in 1867 it was purchased by Lewis F. Weber. The Webers were musicians and Lewis Weber and his sons conducted an orchestra at nearby Fauquier White Sulphur Springs. It was next owned by J. W. Golden, who sold it to J. Temple Gwathmey, a Virginian and a prominent financier and sportsman. He built a handsome semi-colonial residence and named it Canterbury after his family estate in King and Queen Co. He also built a large horse stable for his thoroughbreds and the necessary outbuildings. Mr. Gwathmey's residence burned and the estate was sold to Joshua Cosden, a businessman from New York, who built a race track and barn and a 100 stall stable. Colonel Albert E. Peirce was the next owner, who built the present residence and swimming pool. For many years it was a show place. In 1941 Mr. and Mrs. Leon Cotnareanu of New York and Paris purchased the estate and named it Le Baron. The Cotnareanus visited Le Baron at intervals and entertained extensively. In 1972 "Le Baron" was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. George W. Offutt, who have reinstated the old name "Canterbury". They have disposed of the additional acreage that had been added to the estate on the Culpeper side of the Rappahannock River, retaining only about 500 acres for grazing. "The Cottage", which was built by George Settle in a grove of beautiful old trees, still retains its beauty and charm. It has been used by the different owners, from time to time, as a guest house and for offices. It has a long living room and a wing containing a dining room and a den or study. Three bedrooms are located on the second floor ('Canterbury' Soon Will Know Former Charm, M. Louise Evans, The Fauquier Democrat, Warrenton, VA, 1962).

It required courage and a high degree of initiative for a man seventy-five years of age to sell his ancestral plantation in VA, turn his back on lifetime friends, leave behind the comforts of civilization, and plunge into the wilderness of KY to start anew the clearing of virgin forests, building and planting. This record of George Settle is a good example of the forward looking pioneer spirit that opened up the frontier areas of America.

The will of George Settle, dated 20 May 1820, probated in the July Court, 1820 (Will Book B, page 310, Warren Co., KY), Warren Co., KY, was witnessed by Argible Lawrence and William Willis. Under the terms of the will son, Charles, received 100 acres of land "bought of Daniel Weathers" and "also the twenty acres that I bought of John Mayfield sons [NOTE: I have a copy of the will and I read it as John Mayfield Senr], with the grist mill that is now on it..." Daughter "Molly Smith to have the land that she now lives on, which land I purchased of John Marr ... The balance of my land and other property to be sold and divided in the following manner, That is my son Thomas Settle deceased, his heirs to have fifty dollars extra and then the balance of my estate to be equally divided between my son Thomas Settle deceased, his heirs, and my daughter Hannah Willis, deceased and the heirs of her body, my daughter Betsey Young and the heirs of her body; my son William Settle deceased and his heirs, my daughter Molly Smith and the heirs of her body, my son J. M. Settle, my son Isaac Settle and my son Simon Settle." Executors named were Daniel Daughtry, George Russell and John Beckham.
The sale of the estate of George Settle, deceased, was held on three successive days, August 31, September 1-2, as reported by the Executors to a Court held for Warren Co., KY, October, 1820 (Will Book B, pages 330-334, Warren Co., KY). This sale is interesting in that it shows that all of the slaves were acquired by members of the family and it establishes with reasonable certainty that son Isaac Settle of Fauquier Co., VA, was present. He acquired a slave boy named Noah, a bay mare and a lot of eight "hoggs". He no doubt sold the "hoggs" locally and returned to VA with Noah and the horse. Among the many scores of purchasers at the sale were: Robert Rasdall, Jonathan Manley, Gabriel G. Manley, Bartholomew Gunstead, John Cole, Andrew Christy, Simon Settle, Mary Smith, Walter Lawrence, Jesse Morris, James Mathews, John Dickenson, William Sneed, James Rogers, James Gillax, Nelson Landrum, Valentine Dickerson, Jeremiah Lutrell, Joe Daughtry, Lawrey Bishop, Washington Smith, Thomas Wright, Franklin Settle, Ebaneza Ellis, Wm. Clayton, Pleasant Emmerson, Dana Rasdall, Cornelius Manley, Lewis Porter, Jos. A. Henderson, Wm. Wright, James J. Foster, Thomas Manley, Francis Willis, Charles Settle, Stephen Daughtry, Elizabeth Young, French Settle, William Willis, Nancy Willis, Robert Graham, Paul Shirley, Robert Jameson, Benjamin Gassoway, Thomas L. Morris, Wm. Stewart, Thomas Powell, Robert Lewis, Bond Wheeler, Benj. Boyston, Bartley Boyston, Joel Pickenson, Jas. Landrum, Michial Dillingham, Nimrod Young, David Gunnerly, Champ Carom, Jacob Gibson, James Cooney, Eba. Button, George Carter, Wm. Forester, John Emmerson, Benj. Carraway, David Shipman, John Beckham, Samuel Pullen, Elijah Smith, Jess Dalton, John McCoy, John Gains, John Cooney, Felix Settle, William Edmunds, Valentine Cosby, Benjamin Lutrell, Allen Moore, John Franklin, Nancy Button, Miner Lawrence, Chas. Lewis, David Shipman, Nat. Duff, Lucie Willis, Lewis Willis, and David Spillman.

All of his children were probably born in Fauquier Co., VA.

From: George Settle of Faquier Co VA
To: Simon Settle
Type: Power of attorney re deeds of 2 tracts of land in Barren Co.
Names Cited: Henry Vowles, Wm. Settle, Charles Morgan
Date: 29 June 1802
Source: Barren Co KY Deed Book B, p. 22.

From: Geo. Settle of Faquier Co VA
To: Wm. Settle of Barren Co KY
Type: Land on Skagg's Creek
Date: 17 Mar 1806
Source: Barren Co KY Deed Book B, p. 85.

Geo Settle paid to Isaac Smith, quit claim deed
Type: Land on Beaver Creek
Note: Recorded Fauquer Co VA 28 Feb 1803.
Source: Barren Co KY Deed Book B, p. 141.

Warren Co., KY - Will Book B, Page 310, July Court 1820
Will of GEORGE SETTLE. In the name of God Amen. I GEORGE SETTLE of Warren County and State of Kentucky being of perfect mind and memory make this my last Will and Testament. First I desire to be buried in a decent Christian like manner. My temporal Estate I bequeath and dispose of in the following manner, viz:

To my son CHARLES SETTLE I bequeath the tract of land that bought of DANIEL WEATHERS for one hundred acres be the same more or less also the twenty acres that I bought of JOHN MAYFIELD, SENR. with the Grist Mill that is now on it which tract of land I have made Deeds for to said CHARLES SETTLE, also one trunk, one Negro boy named Woodford, also one Negro girl named Catherine which is a child of Sonnys which girl is gave for the passing of the Balance of Sonny's Children and at my death Sonny and the balance of her children to be given up and sold with my other property that is to be sold. Also to my daughter MOLLY SMITH to have the land she now lives on, which land I purchased of JOHN MAN [NOTE: it looked like MAN in the will, but the Settle book shows it to be MARR.]. But it is to be understood that the land is to be valued by two?? or more disinterested persons and if valued to more than her equal part she must pay the surplus of the balance to the heirs, and if it is valued less than the value of her part, it is to be made up to her. The balance of my lands and other property to be sold and divided in the following manner. That is my son THOMAS SETTLE Deceased, his heirs to have fifty dollars extra, and then the balance of my estate to be equally divided Between my son THOMAS SETTLE deceased, his heirs, and my Daughter HANNAH WILLIS Deceased, the heirs of her body, my daughter BETSEY YOUNG and the heirs of her body, my son WILLIAM SETTLE Deceased his heirs, my daughter MOLLY SMITH, and the heirs of her body, my son J. M. SETTLE, my son ISAAC SETTLE, and my son SIMON SETTLE. I also wish and make choices of DANIEL DAUGHTRY, GEORGE RUSSELL and JOHN BECKHAM as executors to my estate whom I constitute and appoint as executors of this my last will and testament. I do hereby utterly revoke and dissolve all wills [NOTE: last line on page could not be read]

Page 311: heretofore made declaring and ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twentieth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty.

Signed sealed published and declared by the within Testator GEORGE SETTLE to be his last will and testament. In presence of us who subscribed our name in presence of the testator and of each other.
GEORGE SETTLE (Seal)
ARGIBLE LAWRENCE
WILLIAM (his X mark) WILLIS
Warren County - July County Court 1820 [NOTE: it REALLY looks like 1828]
The last will and testament of GEORGE SETTLE Deceased was produced in Court and proved by the oath of WILLIAM WILLIS and ARGIBLE LAWRENCE two of the subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the last will and testament of the said GEORGE SETTLE and ordered
to record.
Test. JON C. HOBSON, CC."


James C Withers

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "Fauquier Marriage Bonds contain the following: Phoebe Morgan and Jacob Fishback Feb. 18, 1771, Alice Morgan and John Fishback June 17, 1771, Rosanna Morgan and Edward Settle Sept. 28, 1772, William Bruce and Hannah Morgan Nov. 28, 1791, James Withers and Frankie Morgan Nov. 12, 1792."

2Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRDJ-RJL. ""Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRDJ-RJL : 11 February 2018), James Withers and Frankey Morgan, 12 Nov 1792; citing Fauquier, Virginia, reference 369; FHL microfilm 31,633." Image.


Frances Morgan

1Tyler's quarterly historical and genealogical magazine - v. 25 (1943-1944) - v. 25, no. 4 Apr 1944, pg 274, 973 B2t 1967 v. 25 1943-1944. "Fauquier Marriage Bonds contain the following: Phoebe Morgan and Jacob Fishback Feb. 18, 1771, Alice Morgan and John Fishback June 17, 1771, Rosanna Morgan and Edward Settle Sept. 28, 1772, William Bruce and Hannah Morgan Nov. 28, 1791, James Withers and Frankie Morgan Nov. 12, 1792."

2Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRDJ-RJL. ""Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XRDJ-RJL : 11 February 2018), James Withers and Frankey Morgan, 12 Nov 1792; citing Fauquier, Virginia, reference 369; FHL microfilm 31,633." Image.


James Morgan

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/189131443/james-morgan. "James Morgan was the owner of a large landed estate, Fauquier County, VA, and engaged in the production and exportation of tobacco. He married Caroline White Skinker 3 December 1807. The couple had three children, Mary, William James and Caroline.

James Morgan later exchanged his Oak Hill with Chief Justice Marshall for Clover Hill where the two youngest Morgan children were born.

James Morgan and his brother, William, operated a store and mill at Clover Hill.

Source: "Samuel Skinker and His Descendants Youngest Branch-Skinker, Whiting, Morgan,” image 153/page 253." Image.


Caroline White Skinker

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/189131553/caroline-white-morgan. Image.