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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Honorable Samuel K Hanson

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, P 166-167, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "[ From the Lexington Observer and Republican, 1858.]

Death has claimed as its victim another of Kentucky's most distinguished citizens.  Samuel Hanson, Esq., of the county of Clark, is no more.  He died after a long protracted illness at his residence in the town of Winchester, on Saturday morning last at 8:30 o'clock.

Samuel Hanson was no ordinary man; indeed he was in every sense of the term an extraordinary man.  Nature had dealt lavishly with him, and her gifts had been nurtured and cultivated with great assiduity.  Born in the city of Alexandria, then in the District of Columbia, he received the benefits of a superior scholastic and legal education, and at an early age exhibited promises of the ability and usefulness which characterized his subsequent career.  He left the District about fifty years ago, in the company with Mr. Clay, then a member of the National Legislature, for Kentucky, and, after a brief residence in other sections of the State, located in the county in which he died, and for upwards of forty years has been regarded by its citizens with the respect, esteem and confidence which are always the attendants of a life of public usefulness and of private worth.

But the fame of Samuel Hanson was not alone confined to the county in which he lived, or its immediate vicinity.  He was extensively and favorably known throughout the Commonwealth, and his name will long be remembered and revered by hosts of true-hearted friends in every section of the State.  His fine scholarly attainments, great legal learning and superior natural abilities placed him in the front rank of statesmen and jurists in Kentucky, and commanded for him a position and a reputation of which any man might be justly proud.  He was always a firm and consistent Whig, repeatedly represented his county in both branches of the Legislature, and at one time filled the office of Speaker of the Senate with great credit and distinction.  The records of the Legislature for years bear the impress of his masterly genius and the conservative principles which marked his whole political history; and few survive him who have exerted a more potent influence upon the policy of the State during the stormiest periods of her political history.

But it was not alone in his public capacity that Samuel Hanson was distinguished. In all his private relations, like the illustrious Bayard, he was, without fear and without reproach.  A kind and indulgent husband and father, a faithful counselor and a steadfast friend, he will be remembered as the man who fulfilled his every duty to those connected with him by the most endearing ties.  But eulogy in regard to such a man soon exhausts itself, and we close this brief and imperfect tribute to an old and valued friend, by directing attention to an obituary in another part of our paper by a distinguished contemporary of the illustrious dead."

2William B. Allen, Louisville, Kentucky, Kentucky, History of, Bradley and Gilbert,1872, pg 251. "Samuel Hanson, of Clark County, Kentucky, was born in May, 1786, and died in February, 1858, at the age of nearly seventy-two years. His birth place was in the State of Maryland, and he studied law in the District of Columbia. He was one of the most learned and accurate of his profession. He understood and practiced the system of pleading with great success. He was frequently a member in both branches of the Kentucky Legislature. Rodger Hanson was his son, who took an active part in the war of the Rebellion as a general on the Confederate side. he was a talented and brave man, ambitious of fame, and died valiantly fighting for the cause he had espoused with great ardor."

31850 U.S. Census, M432_196 pg 42, 14 Sep 1850. "Samuel Hanson 64 M Lawyer Virginia
Minerva Hanson 43 F Kentucky
Sarah Hanson 26 F Kentucky
Samuel Hanson Jr 18 M Kentucky
Thomas Hanson 16 M Kentucky
Lydia Hanson 14 F Kentucky
Mary R. Hanson 14 F Kentucky
Ellen  Hanson 10 F Kentucky
Isaac D Hanson 6 M Kentucky."


Gen Richard Hickman

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, D 6, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "General Richard Hickman, son of James and his wife, Hannah Lewis, was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1757, and was a Revolutionary soldier.  He emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky with his father and others of the Hickman family to what is now Clark county.  He was a farmer by occupation, with a mind far above mediocrity; having been raised in the colony of Virginia at a time when there were but few schools in the country, it could not be expected that his education was very thorough; notwithstanding, he was called from his plowhandles by the citizens of his county and elected as a member of the convention that formed the Constitution of Kentucky in 1799.  He served his country over twenty years as Senator in the Kentucky Legislature.  He was elected Lieutenant-Governor of Kentucky, and during this official term the war of 1812 occurred.  The Legislature requested Governor Isaac Shelby to take the field in person against the Indians and command the troops of the State, which order he obeyed.  During the absence of Governor Shelby on the military expedition, General Richard Hickman acted as Governor of the State.  Hickman county in Kentucky was named in honor of General Richard Hickman.  In 1787 General Richard Hickman married Lydia, the widow of Christopher Irvine, whose maiden name was Lydia Calloway, daughter of Colonel Calloway, who was killed by the Indians."

2Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), p.164. "In December the Indians made furious assaults upon this fort (where Boonesboro now stands), by which Boone lost one man killed and another wounded; but the Indians were repulsed with great slaughter.  This defeat was so severe that the Indians treacherously appeared reconciled, and seemed to give up all ideas of assaulting the fort or molesting the whites.  This caused the inhabitants of the fort to be less guarded, and they made frequent visits and excursions into the forest around.  On the 14th of July, 1776 (just seven months from their last attack), as three young ladies v two daughters of Col. Calloway (Lydia and Elizabeth) and the third, of Colonel Boone v were leisurely strolling in the woods, they were pursued by the Indians and caught before they could reach the gates of the fort.  At this moment Boone was off hunting, but when he returned, without any aid he followed alone the tracks of the Indians.  He knew that if he waited to collect force the cunning robbers would be entirely beyond pursuit. With a sagacity peculiar to hunters, he followed their trail without the least deviation, while the girls had the presence of mind to snap off small twigs, from time to time, as they passed through the shrubbery on their route.  At last he came in sight of them, and by the aid of his unerring rifle killed two of the Indians and recovered these young ladies, and reached the fort safely.  One of these, Elizabeth Calloway, married Samuel Henderson, the brother of Judge Henderson and Major Pleasant Henderson.

The above account of the Misses Calloway and Miss Boone may also be found in Lippincott binet History of Kentucky, by Arthur and Carpenter on page 35 ; and also in Border Wars, page 256, etc.

General Richard Hickman married, as above stated, Lydia Calloway, one of the three young ladies that were stolen by the Indians, by whom he raised five children, and died in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1832."


Lydia Calloway

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, p.164, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "In December the Indians made furious assaults upon this fort (where Boonesboro now stands), by which Boone lost one man killed and another wounded; but the Indians were repulsed with great slaughter.  This defeat was so severe that the Indians treacherously appeared reconciled, and seemed to give up all ideas of assaulting the fort or molesting the whites.  This caused the inhabitants of the fort to be less guarded, and they made frequent visits and excursions into the forest around.  On the 14th of July, 1776 (just seven months from their last attack), as three young ladies v two daughters of Col. Calloway (Lydia and Elizabeth) and the third, of Colonel Boone v were leisurely strolling in the woods, they were pursued by the Indians and caught before they could reach the gates of the fort.  At this moment Boone was off hunting, but when he returned, without any aid he followed alone the tracks of the Indians.  He knew that if he waited to collect force the cunning robbers would be entirely beyond pursuit. With a sagacity peculiar to hunters, he followed their trail without the least deviation, while the girls had the presence of mind to snap off small twigs, from time to time, as they passed through the shrubbery on their route.  At last he came in sight of them, and by the aid of his unerring rifle killed two of the Indians and recovered these young ladies, and reached the fort safely.  One of these, Elizabeth Calloway, married Samuel Henderson, the brother of Judge Henderson and Major Pleasant Henderson.

The above account of the Misses Calloway and Miss Boone may also be found in Lippincott binet History of Kentucky, by Arthur and Carpenter on page 35 ; and also in Border Wars, page 256, etc.

General Richard Hickman married, as above stated, Lydia Calloway, one of the three young ladies that were stolen by the Indians, by whom he raised five children, and died in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1832."

2Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), D 6. "General Richard Hickman, son of James and his wife, Hannah Lewis, was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1757, and was a Revolutionary soldier.  He emigrated from Virginia to Kentucky with his father and others of the Hickman family to what is now Clark county.  He was a farmer by occupation, with a mind far above mediocrity; having been raised in the colony of Virginia at a time when there were but few schools in the country, it could not be expected that his education was very thorough; notwithstanding, he was called from his plowhandles by the citizens of his county and elected as a member of the convention that formed the Constitution of Kentucky in 1799.  He served his country over twenty years as Senator in the Kentucky Legislature.  He was elected Lieutenant-Governor of Kentucky, and during this official term the war of 1812 occurred.  The Legislature requested Governor Isaac Shelby to take the field in person against the Indians and command the troops of the State, which order he obeyed.  During the absence of Governor Shelby on the military expedition, General Richard Hickman acted as Governor of the State.  Hickman county in Kentucky was named in honor of General Richard Hickman.  In 1787 General Richard Hickman married Lydia, the widow of Christopher Irvine, whose maiden name was Lydia Calloway, daughter of Colonel Calloway, who was killed by the Indians."


Christopher Irvine

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, p.164, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "In December the Indians made furious assaults upon this fort (where Boonesboro now stands), by which Boone lost one man killed and another wounded; but the Indians were repulsed with great slaughter.  This defeat was so severe that the Indians treacherously appeared reconciled, and seemed to give up all ideas of assaulting the fort or molesting the whites.  This caused the inhabitants of the fort to be less guarded, and they made frequent visits and excursions into the forest around.  On the 14th of July, 1776 (just seven months from their last attack), as three young ladies v two daughters of Col. Calloway (Lydia and Elizabeth) and the third, of Colonel Boone v were leisurely strolling in the woods, they were pursued by the Indians and caught before they could reach the gates of the fort.  At this moment Boone was off hunting, but when he returned, without any aid he followed alone the tracks of the Indians.  He knew that if he waited to collect force the cunning robbers would be entirely beyond pursuit. With a sagacity peculiar to hunters, he followed their trail without the least deviation, while the girls had the presence of mind to snap off small twigs, from time to time, as they passed through the shrubbery on their route.  At last he came in sight of them, and by the aid of his unerring rifle killed two of the Indians and recovered these young ladies, and reached the fort safely.  One of these, Elizabeth Calloway, married Samuel Henderson, the brother of Judge Henderson and Major Pleasant Henderson.

The above account of the Misses Calloway and Miss Boone may also be found in Lippincott binet History of Kentucky, by Arthur and Carpenter on page 35 ; and also in Border Wars, page 256, etc.

General Richard Hickman married, as above stated, Lydia Calloway, one of the three young ladies that were stolen by the Indians, by whom he raised five children, and died in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1832."


Lydia Calloway

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, p.164, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "In December the Indians made furious assaults upon this fort (where Boonesboro now stands), by which Boone lost one man killed and another wounded; but the Indians were repulsed with great slaughter.  This defeat was so severe that the Indians treacherously appeared reconciled, and seemed to give up all ideas of assaulting the fort or molesting the whites.  This caused the inhabitants of the fort to be less guarded, and they made frequent visits and excursions into the forest around.  On the 14th of July, 1776 (just seven months from their last attack), as three young ladies v two daughters of Col. Calloway (Lydia and Elizabeth) and the third, of Colonel Boone v were leisurely strolling in the woods, they were pursued by the Indians and caught before they could reach the gates of the fort.  At this moment Boone was off hunting, but when he returned, without any aid he followed alone the tracks of the Indians.  He knew that if he waited to collect force the cunning robbers would be entirely beyond pursuit. With a sagacity peculiar to hunters, he followed their trail without the least deviation, while the girls had the presence of mind to snap off small twigs, from time to time, as they passed through the shrubbery on their route.  At last he came in sight of them, and by the aid of his unerring rifle killed two of the Indians and recovered these young ladies, and reached the fort safely.  One of these, Elizabeth Calloway, married Samuel Henderson, the brother of Judge Henderson and Major Pleasant Henderson.

The above account of the Misses Calloway and Miss Boone may also be found in Lippincott binet History of Kentucky, by Arthur and Carpenter on page 35 ; and also in Border Wars, page 256, etc.

General Richard Hickman married, as above stated, Lydia Calloway, one of the three young ladies that were stolen by the Indians, by whom he raised five children, and died in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1832."


Capt Llewellen Hickman

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, E 1, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "Captain Llewellen Hickman, was an officer in the regular army during the war of 1812.  He was stationed at Prairie du Chien, on the Mississippi river.  He married Agnes St. Cyr, a French lady, of St. Louis, Mo., by whom he raised one son, and died in St. Louis, Mo."


Elizabeth Hickman

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, P 165, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "For further information relative to Elizabeth Hickman and her husband, John Lewis Hickman, and their posterity, the reader is referred to John L. Hickman, third child of David and his wife, Clara McClanahan, on another page of this work."


Catharine Hickman

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "OBITUARY:  Died on the 11th day of July, 1878, at her home, the residence of her son, R. H. Prewitt, Esq., in Clark county, Mrs. Kitty Prewitt, relict of General William C. Prewitt, in the 82d year of her age.  She survived her husband many years, and died on the forty-sixth anniversary of their marriage.  The deceased was a daughter of General Richard Hickman, of Clark county, and long survived his other children.  She was a native of Clark county and always resided there or in Fayette, and never more than ten miles from the place of her birth.  She was a true type of a Kentucky matron of the old school, distinguished alike for the kindness of her disposition, and the firmness, integrity and purity of her character; gentle and dignified in her bearing, plain, open and unostentatious in her manners, she inspired the confidence and respect of all with whom she came in contact.
    More than half a century before her death she made an open profession of her faith in Christ, and became a member of the Christian church at old Mt. Zion, in the neighborhood in which she lived, and was a faithful, pious, devoted and exemplary Christian.  She was gifted with a mind of uncommon strength, improved by reading, reflection and thought.  She was always the center of a gentle and happy influence in the social circle; quiet and unobtrusive, candid and true. She loved truth for its own sake, and utterly despised all sham, whether in morals, politics, religion or anywhere. Filled with womanly sympathy and affection, calm and equable in temperament, wise, discreet and judicious, she was ever the true and sympathizing friend, the reliable, considerate and trusted counselor of her family and friends. The writer has never met with any one whose character combined more of the virtues and graces that adorn the woman and the Christian.  Her unfaltering faith in the precious promises of the Saviour, which enabled her to meet and bear with cheerfulness the trials, the troubles, the afflictions v bodily and mental v of a long life, was indeed beautiful.  The serene resignation with which she contemplated her dissolution, is a priceless consolation to her kindred and friends in this great bereavement.
    She is gone to another and better world, but the example of her beautiful life remains to bless mankind, and its silent influence will be felt by those yet unborn."


Richard Hickman Prewitt

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, P 165, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "Richard H., is a graduate of Bethany College, Virginia, and also graduated in the Law Class in Louisville, Ky., and in 1857 was engaged in the practice of his profession in Lexington, Ky."


David Prewitt

1Lewis, William Terrell of Perryville, Miss. 1893., Lewis Family in America, Genealogy of the (From the Middle of the Seventeenth Century Down to the Present Time), Higginson Publishing in Salem, Massachusetts, P 165, FHC 483707. Exerpts provided by Michael Lewis Monroe who has edited 1100 pages of William Terrell Lewis' original book. "David, was a soldier in the Confederate service under the command of General John H. Morgan.  He survived the war and is now married."