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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


George Priest

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=22200497. "George Priest was born August 6 1748 in VA to Peter Priest and Sarah Lawrence. He married France Catlett Dec 25 1771 in VA. He was a Rev. War soldier. Moved in 1793 to Sideveiw, Montgomery Co. KY where he built a house made from the local brick which still stands today. George Priest died Dec 7 1829 and is buried way up on a hill behind his house under a big oak tree. His gravestone is still there resting against the oak tree. It is barely legible but can see a hand in the center of the stone with a finger pointing upward toward heaven. His wife is also buied there but no stone exits for her." Image.


Frances Catlett

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=22679363. "Daughter of John Catlett. Wife of George Priest. Married 25 Dec 1771 in Virginia. Buried beside her husband up on a hill behind their home under big oak tree." Image.


Horatio Gates Catlett

1Wm C. Stubbs, New Orleans, Catlett-John, History of Two Virginia Families transplanted from Kent, England, Joel Munson & Sons, Albany, N. Y., pg 59-60, FHL 929.273 B345s. ""Sawny Catlett's bones lie buried in the old Catlett burying ground near the barn of Col. L. T. Moore.

His son Horatio was the first prominent hotel-keeper at the 'mouth.' He was also a merchant, postmaster, farmer, ferryman and general trader. A line of stages ran through the place from Lexington, Ky., to Charleston, Va., in early times, and Mr. Catlett had the honor of entertaining such notable personages as Gen. Jackson, Henry Clay and Felix Grundy.

While the 'Catlett House" was only a plain log building, the splendid menu spread for its guests, with the charming loveliness of the ladies of the household, made it a hostelry far in advance of its day. Several of the present matrons, who were young misses in the days of the Catletts, tell us that the Misses Catlett were the most charming and lovely maidens they ever knew.

In 1847 Horatio Catlett returned to the 'mouth.' Hearing before he came that the valuable property was about passing from his ownership caused his rage to boil over on reaching the hotel, and he died so suddenly that an autopsy was deemed necessary. * * * His remains are interrred by the side of his father and two of his daughters. The death of Horatio Catlett ended the Catlett dynasty at the 'mouth.' They will long be remembered as giving their name to the creek running through the town and to the town itself."

pg 63-64
(3) Horatio Gates, d. 1847 at Catlettsburg, Kv., mar., Dec. 22, 1809, by Rev. Wm. Hill, his cousin Molly Ann, b. Jan. 2, 1784, dau. of Henry and Miriam (Calmes) Catlett, of White Post, Frederick Co., Va. Horatio once owned everything at Catlettsburg, Ky., but sold out and moved to St. Joe, Mo., and died at Catlettsburg, Ky., on a visit to it in 1847, and is buried there beside his father and other members of the family.
Horatio had issue:

(a) Miriam Calmes, mar. Thos. H. Frame, of Staunton, Va. Issue:
   (I) Fannie Catlett, b. 1840 in Catlettsburg, Ky., mar., 1861, Jno. Kenny Cravens, b. 1838, d. 1892, a
distinguished lawyer of Kansas City, Mo., and had Horace, b. 1862, d. 1864; James Harrison, b. 1865, a graduate of Williams College, Mass., 1887, and after a year spent abroad graduated at Columbia College, N. Y., mar. Lorena Searcy and lives in Kansas City, Mo. Issue: Jno. Kenney, b. 1902, d. 1911; Virginia, d. at birth, 1912; Elizabeth, b. 1915; Lanier, b. 1869, mar. Agnes Maud Hughes, born in Ireland. They live in Toronto, Canada and have Francis Fairfax Cravens, b. 1905. John Smith, b. 1871, mar. Mildred May Myers; no issue. He is a banker in Pasadena, Cal. Francis Catlett, b. 1878, mar. Frances Page Carter and have issue: Miriam Calmes, b. 1913. They live in Kansas City, Mo.
   (II) Sarah, b. 1842, mar. James P. Caldwell, of Larimie, Wyo., and had issue: Miriam, unmarried; Jane, unmarried; James mar. and lives in Denver, Col.
     III. James mar. and has two daughters.
     IV. Son; no issue.
      V. Son; no issue.
     VI. Son; no issue.
Mrs. Fannie Catlett Cravens is still living in Kansas City and she and her daughter, Mrs. Carter, have kindly
furnished much information relative to their branch of the Catlett family.

(b) Hanson, died in California. There is a Hanson George Catlett given as captain and assistant quartermaster in
Mexican War, 1847-8, by Heitman, but Mrs. Cravens says this Hanson lived at home in Missouri until he went to California in the gold fever of 1849, where he died unmarried.
(c) Susan Frances, b. 1819, d. 1899, never married, made her home with her niece, Mrs. Cravens, in Kansas City,
Mo., who speaks of her as "truly a saintly, much-admired woman."
(d) Henry, died in Virginia, whither he went late in life to take care of his aunts. Never married." Source Image. Citation Image.

2Carol A. Hauk, Catlett, Descendants of John Catlett of Virginia
, The Virginia Ancestor Series. Volume II Edition 6. Hauk Data Services, Anderson, Indiana 1996
, pg 48, 929.273 C289h. "558. Horatio Gates Catlett (211.Alexander5, 74 John5 , 29.William4 , 8,David3 , 2.Nicholas2 , Uohn1 ) m. 22 Dec 1809, Molly Ann Catlett, b. 2 Jan 1784, (daughter of Henry Catlett and Miriam Calmes). Horatio died 1847, Catlettsburg, kentucky.
Children:
1353. i Hanson Catlett b. 1804, Clarke County, Virginia, d. California.
1354. ii Henry Catlett b. 1807, Clarke County, Virginia, d. Virginia.
1355 iii Miriam Calmes Catlett b. 1811, m. Thomas H Frame.
1356 iv Susan Francos Catlett b. 1819, d. 1899, Kansas City, Missouri." Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/80566668/horatio-gates-catlett. "From William Ely's Big Sandy Valley, History of the People and Country, published 1887:

The Catletts were Virginians. Sawny, the father of Horatio, came with his family to the 'mouth' early in the century. He brought Negro slaves with him and was a well-to-do man. The creek running through the town of Catlettsburg bears the Catlett name, in addition to the name of the live, busy mart of trade often called the 'Gate City' — the only monuments, commemorating the once proud family. Sawny Catlett's bones lie buried in the old Catlett burying ground near the barn of Col. Laban T. Moore.

"Horatio was the first prominent hotel keeper at the 'mouth.' [Horatio] was also a merchant, postmaster, farmer, ferryman and general trader. A line of stages ran through the place from Lexington, KY to Charleston, VA in early times, and Mr. [Horatio] Catlett had the honor of entertaining such notable personages as Gen. Jackson, Henry Clay and Felix Grundy.

"While the 'Catlett House' was only a plain log building, the splendid menu spread for its guests, with the charming loveliness of the ladies of the household, made it a hostelry far in advance of its day. Several of the present matrons, who were young misses in the days of the Catletts, tell us that the Misses Catlett were the most charming and lovely maidens they ever knew...The death of Horatio Catlett ended the Catlett dynasty at the 'mouth'. They will long be remembered as giving their name to the creek [Catlett's Creek] running through the town and to the town itself." Image.


Mary Ann Catlett

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/73354874/mary-ann-catlett. Image.


Lieutenant Alexander Catlett

1Wm C. Stubbs, New Orleans, Catlett-John, History of Two Virginia Families transplanted from Kent, England, Joel Munson & Sons, Albany, N. Y., pgs 58-59, FHL 929.273 B345s. "Alexander Catlett, (Son of John, of Fauquier. Will 1778.) seems to have been a prosperous man. In 1776 he is a citizen of Prince William County, Va., and published in the Virginia Gazette "one Chas. Adams, who sold him a negro woman whom he knew to be a lunatic." In 1778, as the deed given above shows, he was a citizen of Loudoun County, Va., In 1790 the census of Maryland places him in Montgomery County, Md., with two white males over sixteen years, and six white males under sixteen years, and two white females. He probably had at this time seven sons and one
daughter besides himself and wife.

In the early part of the nineteenth century he settled at the mouth of the "Big Sandy River" in Kentucky and gave the name of Catlettsburg to the now thriving city built upon his lands on the Ohio River, as the following will show. He seems not to have left a will, as in June, 1823, at a court held in Greenup County, Ky., Horatio Catlett obtained letters of administration on the estate of Alexander Catlett, Sr., and appraisers were appointed that made
their final report on the 23rd January, 1824, and ordered recorded. Alex. Catlett was appointed commissioner of revenue taxes by the county court of Greenup, Ky., Feb. 24, 1805 (County Records).
"The Catletts were Virginians. Sawny, the father of Horatio, came with his family to the 'mouth' early in the century. He brought negro slaves with him and was a well-to-do man. The creek running through the town of Catlettsburg bears the Catlett name, in addition to the name of the live, busy mart of trade often called the 'Gate
City'—the only monuments commemorating the once proud family. "Sawny Catlett's bones lie buried in the old Catlett burying ground near the barn of Col. L. T. Moore." Image.

2FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/80564502. "He ran a trading post on his land in Kentucky that served trappers and hunters, and the town of Catlettsburg, Kentucky, on the Ohio River, was named after him. Alexander Catlett's father was John Catlett of Fauquier (Virginia), 1714-1778; his mother is unknown. About 1773, Alexander married Susanna Beall, daughter of Ninian Beall, 1724-1790. In Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, there is a listing for "Alexander Catlett, Loudon Militia, rec. as 2nd Lieut. Sept. 9, 1777." County records show Alexander was appointed commissioner of revenue taxes for Greenup County, Kentucky on February 24, 1805. According to the WPA Guide to Kentucky, part of the Federal Writers' Project of 1939, Alexander Catlett established a trading post that served trappers and hunters of the Ohio and Big Sandy River regions. From William Ely's Big Sandy Valley, History of the People and Country, published 1887: "The Catletts were Virginians. ... The creek running through the town of Catlettsburg bears the Catlett name, in addition to the name of the live, busy mart of trade often called the 'Gate City'—the only monuments, commemorating the once proud family. Sawny Catlett's bones lie buried in the old Catlett burying ground near the barn of Col. Laban T. Moore."." Image.


Grandison Catlett

1Wm C. Stubbs, New Orleans, Catlett-John, History of Two Virginia Families transplanted from Kent, England, Joel Munson & Sons, Albany, N. Y., pg 64, FHL 929.273 B345s. "(5) Grandison is given by Mrs. Fannie Catlett Cravens, of Kansas City, Mo., as one of the brothers of her grandfather, Horatio, and Mr. Grandison Catlett, of Buckton, Va., writes that he was named for him at the request of Mr. Alexander Catlett, Jr., brother of Grandison, who married his aunt, Patsy D. Catlett, daughter of John and Allie T. (King) Catlett. "He died when I was very young and I know nothing of him." It is believed he died unmarried." Image.