picture

Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Henry Lee Borden

MILITARY: 1862 Confederate soldier from Texas in Civil War

ElginHistory.com - Elgin: An American History by E. C. Alft
ElginHistory.com Home Page [http://www.ElginHistory.com/eaah/]
CHAPTER III - WATCHES, MILK AND BUTTER
3. Canned Milk
...
Gail Borden never resided in Elgin, but he had purchased a home on Division Street with that intention prior to his death early in 1874. Henry Lee Borden, his eldest son, arrived in town the next year and in 1877, became the local superintendent of the condenser. Born and raised in Texas, he had led a rancher's life, and during the Civil War served as a Confederate cavalry officer. One of the chief heirs of his father's fortune, Borden helped organize the Elgin Lumber Company and was elected president of the Home National Bank. As generous as he was wealthy, he donated a new and more ornamental fountain to replace the original. A pillar of the Episcopal Church, an abstainer from alcoholic spirits, he and his wife, Laura, were among the town's most respected social leaders. Then in January 1883, at the age of fifty, Henry Lee Borden quietly left for New York to pursue an affair with a nineteen-year-old soprano, the daughter of a local shoemaker. He was divorced and lost to Elgin, but he later rose to the presidency of all Borden operations in the United States.

More of the story about the soprano, named Nettie can be found at http://www.ElginHistory.com/eaah/

OBITUARY:
THE BREWSTER STANDARD
BREWSTER, PUTNAM COUNTY, N .Y., FRIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 28, 1902.
HENRY LEE BORDEN.
    The announcement, in Brewster, last Saturday morning, of the sudden death of Mr. Borden at the Van Nuys Hotel, Los Angeles, California, was a surprise to all acquaintances and a severe shock to the circle of friends who have known him and kept in touch with him since he made his first visit here soon after the close of the civil war.
    With wife and son, Louis Lambert, he had been spending some weeks in the vicinity of Los Angeles, hunting for two or three days in succession, then resting and preparing for more of the same sport. Late in the afternoon on the day of his death he returned to the hotel from a trip which netted 281 ducks. He at once sat down and wrote to Major Wells of his success. Although he had passed three score and ten he seemed proud of his rugged manhood and of his ability to handle a gun as effectually as he did when, at the age of 10 years, he killed his first wolf in Texas. After writing, the evening meal followed and later on came the attack of heart disease which ended his life.
    Henry Lee Borden was the eldest son of Gail Borden and was born in Texas. As a boy and youth and young man he knew and endured what many people would term privation and hardship, but he loved it, not to the extent of desiring to continue forever in the same line, but until advancing civilization smoothed the rougher ways and established new conditions. He was quick to accept  and join in all the advances, but he loved best the earlier frontier experiences and never neglected to interest acquaintances and friends, new and old, with stories of at thee Borden log cabin, the first habitation to occupy the site of the present city of Galveston, which, with his parents, himself and several packs of wolves made up all the details necessary to a census enumeration. While the family lived in the log cabin a wave broke over the peninsula —in very much the same volume as the devastating flood of three years ago—driving every living thing to the cleared space on a rise of ground where the cabin was erected. The flood receded almost as quickly as it came, much to the relief of the family.
    Along in the fifties the family moved to Brooklyn, but young Borden, who was fully up to his majority, thought he saw great possibilities in Texas and continued there to engage in and enjoy the cotton and sugar trade and finally to enlist in the Confederate service. He was skillful not only in the use, but in the manufacture of fire arms, and his inventions and active work in that line were considered of great value. His brother, John Gall Borden, it will be remembered, enlisted in General Ketcham's regiment, the 150th of N.Y., and served until the close of the war. Soon after peace was declared the brothers reunited at Brewster.
    The period from '55 to '65 was not only especially trying and eventful and glorious nationally, but it was also a period of struggle and privation , and emancipation for the Borden’s - the great industry which introduced that name to every home the world over, carrying with it a food product more wholesome and involving more millions of money than any other upon earth—had been endowed with new and permanent life through the all-wise combination of Gail Borden's inventive genius with Jeremiah Milbank's money, business ability and scrupulous honor and integrity.
    Beef extracts as well as meat biscuit and the preserving of fruits, had at one time and another, been tried in an experimental way by Gall Borden and the preparation of the beef was for a time under the direction of “H. L.", as he was known by his associates, at Borden, Texas.  Later on all the side issues in business were abandoned and the energy of all the Bordens was devoted to the manufacture of condensed milk. The subject of this sketch serving for many years as president of The New York Condensed Milk Company, and the Illinois Condensing Company, now merged and more popularly known as Borden's Condensed Milk Company.
    Some fifteen years ago Mr. Borden retired from the presidency of the company, but continued a large and helpful interest in it up to the time of his death. Thereafter he did not permit business cares to interfere in any way with his enjoyment of life to the limit — not in any sky-rocket fashion but in a solid comfort manner which included some travel and rest with a great deal of hunting and fishing. The effective use of the rod and gun so necessary to subsistence during his young manhood afforded him splendid exercise until the end. His round of travel for many years included living at his residence in Chicago, occupancy of his cottage and yacht at St. Clair, Michigan, the Murray Hill Hotel in New York, visiting with Major Frank Wells and J. S. Eno at Brewster, and trips to his farm at Tonti, Illinois, where he was prominently known as a breeder of red polled cattle, and occasionally to Florida and California.
    He was a man of generous impulses with a particularly kindly feeling for any one enduring great hardship. A notice in a newspaper of some one badly bereft would cause him often to send a special messenger, to be sure of the need, and to follow inquiry with substantial help. He was not religiously devout, a marked characteristic in the life of his father and younger brother, but be was a God fearing man and once told the writer that during the period of his greatest privation he made a covenant with his Maker that if he ever acquired money be would share it with those less fortunate, and the stubs of his cheCk book furnish evidence that be kept the covenant.
    Like all the Bordens he was a person of marked individuality. Why be wanted a thing this way or that way was not for him to explain, but he wanted it, that was all. He was plain, companionable, always enthusiastic and interesting in relating his experiences, ever the perfect gentleman.
    His traveling party often consisted of five or six persons. His widow, Mrs. Ceresa Loretta Borden, and her son, Louis Lambert, who was employed for time in the First National Bank of Brewster, were with him at the time of his death. Another son, Gerald is a New York  lawyer.
    His last visit to Brewster was in May at the celebration of the wedding of Miss Wells and Mr. Ambrose McCabe. Then he seemed to be in usual health for one of his age with a reasonable life expectancy of many years. Taking a side track at the Borden farm in Tonti while on a private car trip in that vicinity, a few weeks later, Mr. H. H. Vreeland found him engaged in making many improvements and looking to future returns hopefully. He passed the summer at St. Clair, and then followed the trip to Los Angeles, where two of his nephews, Gail Johnson and Milbank Johnson, are engaged in business. One sister, Mrs. Mary Munsill, of Hartford, Connecticut, is now the only survivor of the Gail Borden family.
    The widow having communicated by wire with Frank Wells and John S. Eno a burial plot has been secured in Woodlawn near the Gail Borden plot and the interment will be on Monday, following services at St. Agnes Chapel, Forty-third street, New York, to begin at 11 o’clock.
    A story telegraphed from Los Angeles and published in some of the New York newspapers on Thursday stating  that a strange mystery surrounded Mr. Borden's death, is purely sensational and entirely unwarranted. Everyone who knows anything about it knows that his life was full of happiness for him and for every person around him and that his sudden death is an overwhelming sorrow.
    The funeral of Henry Lee Borden was held at St. Agnes church, New York City, on Monday. The honorary pall bearers were Joseph Milbank, Major Frank Wells, A. B. Church, President Rogers, of Borden's Condensed Milk Co., and four nephews of the deceased.


Henry Lee Borden

MILITARY: 1862 Confederate soldier from Texas in Civil War

ElginHistory.com - Elgin: An American History by E. C. Alft
ElginHistory.com Home Page [http://www.ElginHistory.com/eaah/]
CHAPTER III - WATCHES, MILK AND BUTTER
3. Canned Milk
...
Gail Borden never resided in Elgin, but he had purchased a home on Division Street with that intention prior to his death early in 1874. Henry Lee Borden, his eldest son, arrived in town the next year and in 1877, became the local superintendent of the condenser. Born and raised in Texas, he had led a rancher's life, and during the Civil War served as a Confederate cavalry officer. One of the chief heirs of his father's fortune, Borden helped organize the Elgin Lumber Company and was elected president of the Home National Bank. As generous as he was wealthy, he donated a new and more ornamental fountain to replace the original. A pillar of the Episcopal Church, an abstainer from alcoholic spirits, he and his wife, Laura, were among the town's most respected social leaders. Then in January 1883, at the age of fifty, Henry Lee Borden quietly left for New York to pursue an affair with a nineteen-year-old soprano, the daughter of a local shoemaker. He was divorced and lost to Elgin, but he later rose to the presidency of all Borden operations in the United States.

More of the story about the soprano, named Nettie can be found at http://www.ElginHistory.com/eaah/

OBITUARY:
THE BREWSTER STANDARD
BREWSTER, PUTNAM COUNTY, N .Y., FRIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 28, 1902.
HENRY LEE BORDEN.
    The announcement, in Brewster, last Saturday morning, of the sudden death of Mr. Borden at the Van Nuys Hotel, Los Angeles, California, was a surprise to all acquaintances and a severe shock to the circle of friends who have known him and kept in touch with him since he made his first visit here soon after the close of the civil war.
    With wife and son, Louis Lambert, he had been spending some weeks in the vicinity of Los Angeles, hunting for two or three days in succession, then resting and preparing for more of the same sport. Late in the afternoon on the day of his death he returned to the hotel from a trip which netted 281 ducks. He at once sat down and wrote to Major Wells of his success. Although he had passed three score and ten he seemed proud of his rugged manhood and of his ability to handle a gun as effectually as he did when, at the age of 10 years, he killed his first wolf in Texas. After writing, the evening meal followed and later on came the attack of heart disease which ended his life.
    Henry Lee Borden was the eldest son of Gail Borden and was born in Texas. As a boy and youth and young man he knew and endured what many people would term privation and hardship, but he loved it, not to the extent of desiring to continue forever in the same line, but until advancing civilization smoothed the rougher ways and established new conditions. He was quick to accept  and join in all the advances, but he loved best the earlier frontier experiences and never neglected to interest acquaintances and friends, new and old, with stories of at thee Borden log cabin, the first habitation to occupy the site of the present city of Galveston, which, with his parents, himself and several packs of wolves made up all the details necessary to a census enumeration. While the family lived in the log cabin a wave broke over the peninsula —in very much the same volume as the devastating flood of three years ago—driving every living thing to the cleared space on a rise of ground where the cabin was erected. The flood receded almost as quickly as it came, much to the relief of the family.
    Along in the fifties the family moved to Brooklyn, but young Borden, who was fully up to his majority, thought he saw great possibilities in Texas and continued there to engage in and enjoy the cotton and sugar trade and finally to enlist in the Confederate service. He was skillful not only in the use, but in the manufacture of fire arms, and his inventions and active work in that line were considered of great value. His brother, John Gall Borden, it will be remembered, enlisted in General Ketcham's regiment, the 150th of N.Y., and served until the close of the war. Soon after peace was declared the brothers reunited at Brewster.
    The period from '55 to '65 was not only especially trying and eventful and glorious nationally, but it was also a period of struggle and privation , and emancipation for the Borden’s - the great industry which introduced that name to every home the world over, carrying with it a food product more wholesome and involving more millions of money than any other upon earth—had been endowed with new and permanent life through the all-wise combination of Gail Borden's inventive genius with Jeremiah Milbank's money, business ability and scrupulous honor and integrity.
    Beef extracts as well as meat biscuit and the preserving of fruits, had at one time and another, been tried in an experimental way by Gall Borden and the preparation of the beef was for a time under the direction of “H. L.", as he was known by his associates, at Borden, Texas.  Later on all the side issues in business were abandoned and the energy of all the Bordens was devoted to the manufacture of condensed milk. The subject of this sketch serving for many years as president of The New York Condensed Milk Company, and the Illinois Condensing Company, now merged and more popularly known as Borden's Condensed Milk Company.
    Some fifteen years ago Mr. Borden retired from the presidency of the company, but continued a large and helpful interest in it up to the time of his death. Thereafter he did not permit business cares to interfere in any way with his enjoyment of life to the limit — not in any sky-rocket fashion but in a solid comfort manner which included some travel and rest with a great deal of hunting and fishing. The effective use of the rod and gun so necessary to subsistence during his young manhood afforded him splendid exercise until the end. His round of travel for many years included living at his residence in Chicago, occupancy of his cottage and yacht at St. Clair, Michigan, the Murray Hill Hotel in New York, visiting with Major Frank Wells and J. S. Eno at Brewster, and trips to his farm at Tonti, Illinois, where he was prominently known as a breeder of red polled cattle, and occasionally to Florida and California.
    He was a man of generous impulses with a particularly kindly feeling for any one enduring great hardship. A notice in a newspaper of some one badly bereft would cause him often to send a special messenger, to be sure of the need, and to follow inquiry with substantial help. He was not religiously devout, a marked characteristic in the life of his father and younger brother, but be was a God fearing man and once told the writer that during the period of his greatest privation he made a covenant with his Maker that if he ever acquired money be would share it with those less fortunate, and the stubs of his cheCk book furnish evidence that be kept the covenant.
    Like all the Bordens he was a person of marked individuality. Why be wanted a thing this way or that way was not for him to explain, but he wanted it, that was all. He was plain, companionable, always enthusiastic and interesting in relating his experiences, ever the perfect gentleman.
    His traveling party often consisted of five or six persons. His widow, Mrs. Ceresa Loretta Borden, and her son, Louis Lambert, who was employed for time in the First National Bank of Brewster, were with him at the time of his death. Another son, Gerald is a New York  lawyer.
    His last visit to Brewster was in May at the celebration of the wedding of Miss Wells and Mr. Ambrose McCabe. Then he seemed to be in usual health for one of his age with a reasonable life expectancy of many years. Taking a side track at the Borden farm in Tonti while on a private car trip in that vicinity, a few weeks later, Mr. H. H. Vreeland found him engaged in making many improvements and looking to future returns hopefully. He passed the summer at St. Clair, and then followed the trip to Los Angeles, where two of his nephews, Gail Johnson and Milbank Johnson, are engaged in business. One sister, Mrs. Mary Munsill, of Hartford, Connecticut, is now the only survivor of the Gail Borden family.
    The widow having communicated by wire with Frank Wells and John S. Eno a burial plot has been secured in Woodlawn near the Gail Borden plot and the interment will be on Monday, following services at St. Agnes Chapel, Forty-third street, New York, to begin at 11 o’clock.
    A story telegraphed from Los Angeles and published in some of the New York newspapers on Thursday stating  that a strange mystery surrounded Mr. Borden's death, is purely sensational and entirely unwarranted. Everyone who knows anything about it knows that his life was full of happiness for him and for every person around him and that his sudden death is an overwhelming sorrow.
    The funeral of Henry Lee Borden was held at St. Agnes church, New York City, on Monday. The honorary pall bearers were Joseph Milbank, Major Frank Wells, A. B. Church, President Rogers, of Borden's Condensed Milk Co., and four nephews of the deceased.