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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Leonard Burden

Information sent from Charles Burden to T.Mason on 8Nov2014. Correction requested by Amy Robbins on 10Apr2018, "Leonard Burden married Rachel Coleman. Had one son Jesse, who died one year old, two daughter, Alice and Lillie. Alice is now the wife of George Haverstock of Rolling Prairie, Ind. Lillie is now the wife of Melvin Robbins and lives near Knox, Stark Co., Ind. Leanard lives with this daughter."


Edward Burden

BIRTHDATE-CONFLICT: The birth year of 1768 shown on FindaGrave just does not fit with the rest of the family facts.
In Mamie's letter she also cites the birthdate of 1 March 1768 as his birthdate.
Since the parent's marriage date was 1775 then the date is incorrect.
It would seem that the calculated age should have been 1778 instead of 1768.

Comments from Gerald Burden about Edward's birthdate: "None of the 8 or 10 pieces of information we have agrees with the birth date of March 1, 1768 indicated by his age on his tombstone. None of the five censuses he’s listed in agree with that birth date. In 1820 he’s in the 26-44 bracket, but if he had been born in 1768 he would have been 52. In 1830 he’s in the 50-59 bracket, but but if he had been born in 1768 would have been 62. In 1840 he’s in the 60-69 bracket, but but if he had been born in 1768 would have been 72. In 1850 he’s listed as 80, but would have been 82. (There are three other incorrect ages in his household in the 1850 census.) He would have been age 25 when the 1793 New Jersey Militia Census was taken, but there is no one named Edward Borden (or any spelling even close) listed anywhere in New Jersey. Also, in 1823 he would have been age 55 marrying 20 year old Lavina Mason, which is a bit unusual. And, he would have been conceived when his father was only 16, which is too unusual to even be believable. If Edward’s May 25, 1853 tombstone didn’t say "aged 85 y 2 m 24 ds", but instead said aged 75 y 2 m 24 ds, it would all fit."

Information sent to T.Mason by Charles Burden on 11 Nov 2014. "Quoting from Mamie Weissert’s letter dated July 29, 1958 - Edward (1) Married first wife in New Jersey and had 2 children – sons, bound out in NJ and left when the family moved to Ohio.
(2) Married Hannah Kelley and had 5 children – Edward, William, Elizabeth, Mary Ann and Stacy. Don’t know where they were married but my grandfather, Stacy, was born in Ohio. (3) Married Lavina Mason and had 12 children – Jessefiah, Nancy, Joseph, Thomas, Rebecca, Shadrach, James, Leonard, Margaret, Martha and two daughters that died in infancy."

Transcriber's notes by Gerald Burden.
"Uncle Ned’s son James Burden’s summer of 1893 on the farm of Mamie’s father would correspond with the Depression of 1893, which caused layoffs in the iron industry where James worked in Ironton, Ohio. It came about when the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890 effectively bankrupted the U.S. by requiring the Treasury to purchase 187.5 tons of silver each month, paying for the silver with Treasury Notes which were redeemable in either gold or silver coin. When the powerful mine owners redeemed the notes they usually specified gold, although the law authorizing the notes stated that the Secretary of the Treasury could, at his discretion, have paid them off in silver dollars. The mine owners had enough clout to get paid in gold, thereby depleting the country's gold reserves and causing a Bank Panic and Depression in 1893.

Edward Burden’s two sons by his first wife in New Jersey being "bound out in NJ and left when the family moved to Ohio" indicates that they were probably "put to trades", a common practice in New England up to the time when a public school system came into existence in the early-to-mid 1800s. The custom prior to that, carried over from England, was for boys to be bound out to apprentice under a person in a trade "when of suitable age", usually around age 14 or 15. The boy would be obligated to work as an apprentice, often in a trade of choice, until age 21 and the tradesman would be obligated to provide room, board, clothing, training in the trade and schooling in "reading and arithmetic so far as is needful to keep a book of accounts."


James Burden

Information sent from Charles Burden to T.Mason on 8Nov2014. Quoting from Mamie (Burden) Weissert "James Burden enlisted in the army at LaPort, Indiana and sickened and died in Camp and was buried at Gallatin, Tennessee in an Orchard."


Leander Burden

In Chicago in 1905 (from mother's obituary)


Shadrack Burden

In Ft. Russell, Wyoming in 1905 (from mother's obituary)


Margaret Ann Burden

Information sent from Charles Burden to T.Mason on 8Nov2014. Quoting from Mamie (Burden) Weissert "Margaret Burden married George Gerard, had three girls, one boy, Shadrack, Ola, Nellie, Lizzie. One of the girls is dead, others all live at Inwood, Ind."


Martha Ann Burden

Information sent from Charles Burden to T.Mason on 8Nov2014. Quoting from Mamie (Burden) Weissert "Martha Burden, the youngest of Grand father Burden's family married Oliver Silvery, had one son Birt, two daughters Alie and Daisey. Birt is a barber and lives at LaPort, Ind. Allie is now the wife of Harry B. Hill and lives at Moundale, Montana. Daisy marrie G.C. Kirkwald and lives at Butt, Montana. Martha married her second husband, an old soldier, named Cummings, Plymouth, Ind. and lives at Wabash, Ind."