picture

Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Thomas Loofbourrow

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Michael S. Cole, [HYPERLINK http://www.thecolefamily.com/hobby/ahnentafel.htm#ahnentafel ] ; ; copy dated 26 Jan 1994 sent to T Mason.


Rebecca Winter

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Michael S. Cole, [HYPERLINK http://www.thecolefamily.com/hobby/ahnentafel.htm#ahnentafel ] ; ; copy dated 26 Jan 1994 sent to T Mason; NOTES: (Stillwell's "Hist & Gen. Misc.," Vol III, p7). Info from Edwin Wallace, Keene, NH. 8 children (not entered).


Thomas Applegate

The following in its entirety is from the "Thomas Taylor & Elizabeth Campbell: 7 American generations originally from Ohio" family tree on Ancestry.com owned and entered by "write2taylor".
THOMAS APPLEGATE ORIGIN: Unknown MIGRATION: 1635 FIRST RESIDENCE: Weymouth REMOVES: Newport 1641, Gravesend 1646 OCCUPATION: Ferryman [ MBCR 1:156, 165, 246, 249]. Planter [ Lechford 392-93]. Weaver [ Chapin 2:141]. EDUCATION: Signed his bond of 11 January 1651 [NS] [ Gravesend TR 1:59]. ESTATE: On 11 November 1646 [NS], John Ruckman sold to "Thomas Applegate" his plantation in Gravesend [ Stillwell 3:2, citing an unknown source (but possibly Gravesend TR 1:4, which is damaged and contains an incomplete 1646 entry involving John Ruckman)]. (The other Gravesend land transactions of the immigrant cited by Stillwell were actually made by Thomas Applegate Junior.) On 8 January 1651 [NS], "Thomas Aplegate Senior" was fined for not keeping his fence in proper repair [Gravesend TR 1:55]. On 23 May 1662 [NS], Salomon Lachaire "drew up a power of attorney in English for Bartholomeus Appel [sic to Henry Timberlake of Road Island, to take up and use for the constituent's benefit a certain piece of land there called Appelgat's Plain formerly belonging to his the constituent's deceased father" [ Lachaire 155]. BIRTH: By about 1598 based on estimated date of marriage. DEATH: Between 18 January 1656 [NS] (when "Thomas Aplegate Senior" appraised the estate of John Morris [Gravesend TR 3:3]) and 1657 (when "Elizabeth Applgate" had 11 acres in the "list of what land every man hath in tillage" in Gravesend in 1657 [Gravesend TR 3:4]). MARRIAGE: By about 1623 Elizabeth _____ (assuming she was the mother of all his children). CHILDREN: i HELENA, b. say 1623; m. (1) by about 1644 Thomas Farrington (on 31 August 1654 [NS] "Thomas Appelgat" sued William Harck, requesting "as grandfather of the surviving child of Thomas Farrington" that the defendant "deliver up to him the goods and cattle, which he as curator of said child has in his possession" [ Fernow 1:235]); m. (2) (as "Helena Appelgat, wede van Thomas Farrington") New Amsterdam 15 August 1646 [NS] Louis Hulet [ NYChR 14]; m. (3) (as "Helena Appelgat") New Amsterdam 9 February 1648 [NS] Carle Morgyn [NYChR 15]. ii BARTHOLOMEW, b. say 1625; m. [blank] October 1650 Hannah/Anneken Patrick [Gravesend TR 1:44], daughter of DANIEL PATRICK [ GMB 3:1405]. iii THOMAS, b. say 1628 (adult by 20 December 1650 [NS], when "Thomas Aplegate Junior" purchased land in Gravesend from Randall Huett [Gravesend TR 1:50]); m. Johanna Gibbons, daughter of Richard Gibbons. (On 9 October 1678, "Richard Gibbons of Midletowne, freeholder," deeded to "Thomas Aplegate Senior of the Falls, inhabitant," "one hundred acres in or upon a certain place called the Nutt Swamp" [East Jersey Deeds AII:142]. In his will of 1 February 1698/9, "Thomas Appell[gate] of Midlton in East Jersey" bequeathed to "my son Benjamine fifty acres of land" and to "my son Richard & his heirs fifty acres of land which aforementioned hundred acres I had of my father-in-law Richard Gibbons"; he also bequeathed to "my loving wife Johanna" [East Jersey Deeds G:1]. On the basis of this will, Stillwell concluded that Johanna was a second wife, and only Benjamin and Richard were her children, a possible but not a necessary conclusion.) iv JOHN, b. about 1630 (d. 1712 aged 82 [ FOOF 1:21, citing Fairfield gravestone]); m. by 1662 Avis Goulding, daughter of William Goulding of Gravesend (on 17 June 1662 [NS], "William Goulder of Gravesend" secured a debt "for the appearer's son-in-law Johan Appelgate" (signed as "William Goulder alias Goulding") [Lachaire 161-62]). (On an unknown date "John Applegate of Fairefeild in the County of Coneticote" sold to "Will[iam] Goulding Junior of Gravesend" a parcel of land in Gravesend, but on 28 October 1673, this sale was made null and void [Gravesend TR 2:208].) (See also FOOF 1:21-22 and Fairfield PD Cases #155 and 156.)
!COMMENTS: On 2 September 1635, "Thomas Aplegate was licensed to keep a ferry betwixt Wessaguscus & Mount Woolliston, for which he is to have 1d. for every person, & iiid. a horse" [MBCR 1:156]. On 3 March 1635/6, "Thomas Aplegate was discharged of keeping the ferry of Waymothe, & Henry Kingman licensed to keep the said ferry during the pleasure of the Court" [MBCR 1:165]. On 4 December 1638, "William Blanton, appearing, was enjoined to appear at the next Court, with all the men that were in the canoe with him, & [blank] Aplegate, which owned the canoe out of which the 3 persons were drowned; & it was ordered, that no canoe should be used at any ferry upon pain of £5, nor no canoe to be made in our jurisdiction before the next General Court, upon pain of £10" [MBCR 1:246]. On 5 March 1638/9, William Blanton, Thomas Applegate and four other men "appearing, were discharged, with an admonition not to adventure too many into any boat," and on the same day "Thomas Aplegate was appointed to have 29s. for his canoe, when the arms which he borrowed are returned back as good as they were when he borrowed them" [MBCR 1:249]. On 6 September 1636, "Elisabeth, the wife of Thomas Aplegate, was censured to stand with her tongue in a cleft stick, for swearing, railing, & reviling" [MBCR 1:177]. In October 1640, Thomas Applegate of Weymouth, planter, hired John King of Weymouth, seaman, to be master of Applegate's boat on a voyage both for fishing and for carrying freight. A dispute arose early in 1641 because King had allowed the boat to be overladen [Lechford 392-93]. On 1 June 1641, "Will[ia]m Newland complains against Thomas Applegate, in an action of trespass upon the case, to the damage of £20. The jury find for the plaintiff, and assess him £8 damages, and the charges of the suit" [ PCR 7:19]. On 1 June 1641, "Richard Burne undertook & promised to make good & pay all such damages as might happen if Thomas Applegate should by bringing the suit about again recover anything against W[illia]m Newland, who this Court hath recovered against the said Applegate £8 damages, and the charges of the suit" [PCR 2:18]. On 6 September 1641, "Thomas Applegate complains against Will[ia]m Newland, in an action of trespass for detaining certain swine. The jury find for the defendant, & give him the charges of the suit" [PCR 7:23]. On 7 September 1641, "George Allen & Mr. Edward Dillingham are nominated, by consent of both parties, to apprize the swine Will[ia]m Newland hath in execution of Thom[as] Applegate, and what the want in value of eight pounds & charges the said Applegate is to give his bill to the said Newland for payment thereof" [PCR 2:24]. (All of the participants in this dispute except for Applegate resided in Sandwich. Applegate may have resided there briefly between his years in Weymouth and Newport, but there is no direct evidence for this.) On 1 December 1641, "[Thomas] Applegate of Nuport" sued John Roome of the same town [Chapin 2:133, 135]. On 7 June 1643, William Dyer of Newport sued "Thomas Applegate, weaver, of the same town," and at the same court session Henry Bull sued Applegate [Chapin 2:141]. On 5 September 1643, "Thomas Applegat of Nuport" sued Edward Andrews, and on the same day he sued "W[illia]m Heavens of Portsmo[uth] upon a mortgage of house & land consigned by Sam[uel] Willbore to the said Thomas" [Chapin 2:147]. On 3 December 1643, a dispute between Nicholas Cotterell and Thomas Applegate was sent to arbitration [Chapin 2:149]; this dispute, or another between the same two men, was still alive in 1646 [Chapin 2:161]. Teunis G. Bergen stated that Thomas Applegate was "in N[ew] A[msterdam] as early as 1641" [Kings County Settlers 14], but no record has been found to support this claim. Thomas Applegate was one of the patentees of Flushing on 10 October 1645 [NS] [Frederick Van Wyck, Select Patents of New York Towns (Boston 1938), pp. 4-8], but he does not seem to have settled there, as he had land at Gravesend very soon after this date. While a resident of Gravesend, Thomas Applegate was frequently before the court for uncivil behavior. On 14 February 1650 [NS], he was censured for making a disturbance at court, so that the court could not go on with its business [Gravesend TR 1:35]. His greatest problem apparently arose from his claim that "the Governor had done him wrong about the orphan [presumably the child his daughter Helena had with Thomas Farrington]," as a result of which he was prosecuted on 8 January 1651 [NS] for slandering the Governor and some residents of Gravesend. For his claim that the Governor had taken a bribe in the case, Applegate was sentenced to have his tongue bored, but after his confession this sentence was apparently reversed [Gravesend TR 1:53-54]. On 11 January 1651 [NS], "Thomas Applegate Senior" was required to post a bond of five hundred guilders to ensure his good behavior, and on 7 July 1652 [NS], this bond was voided [Gravesend TR 1:59]. BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: The best published account of Thomas Applegate and his family was prepared by John E. Stillwell in 1914 [Stillwell 3:1-6]


William Winter

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason by Jane Curci [wmcurci@aol.com] on 14 May 2003.

DATA ON WILLIAM WINTER
By J. KENNETH WINTER
From "History of Center and Clinton Counties" by John Blair Linn
Published 1883 by Louis H. Evarts, Center County, page 221
William Potter, Esq., a grandson of General James Potter of the Revolutionary War, was born at Potters Mills, December 18, 1792. Mrs. Lucy Potter, widow of Hon. W. W. Potter, died in Bellefonte, May 30, 1875, aged eighty-four years, nine months and two days. Mrs. Potter a member of a large and rather remarkable family, her father having been born in 1728, married in 1747, died in 1794, children to number of nineteen being born to him, the eldest in 1790, their births extending over a period of forty-two years. William Winter, the father of the deceased, came from Berks County to Northumberland, now Lycoming County, in the year 1778, having purchased the farm lately known as the Judge Grier farm, near what is called Newberry, but within the corporate limits of Williamsport. Mr. Winter was twice married. His first wife was Ann Boone, sister of col. Daniel Boone, famous in the early annals of Kentucky. His marriage took place in the year 1747 in the then province of Virginia. By this union there were issue eleven children, four males and seven females. His eldest daughter, Hannah, married in Rockingham County, Virginia, Abraham Lincoln, the grandfather of the ex-president Lincoln. Shortly before his death, Lincoln, who was killed by the Indians, visited his father-in-law at what is now Williamsport and John Winter, his brother-in-law, returned with him to Kentucky, whither Mr. Lincoln had removed after his marriage, John being deputed to look after some lands taken up by Col. Daniel Boone and his father. They traveled on foot from the farm by a route leading from where Bellefonte now is the "Indian Path from Bald Eagle to Frankstown". John Winter visited his sister, Mrs. Potter, in 1843, and wandering to the hill upon which the academy is situated, a messenger was sent for him, his friends thinking he had lost himself, but he was only looking for the path he and Lincoln had trod sixty years before, and pointed with his finger the course from Spring Creek along Buffalo Run to where it crosses the "Long Limestone Valley" as being their route. Upon the death of Mr. Winter's first wife, in the year 1771, he again in 1774 married. His second wife was Ellen Campbell, who bore him eight children, three males and five females, of whom the latter, the subject of this sketch, was the youngest. The farther of Mrs. Potter died in 1794, and in 1795, Mrs. Ellen Winter, his widow, was licensed by the Courts of Lycoming County to "keep a house of entertainment" where Williamsport now is, where she lived and reared her children as well as several of her step-children. Here all her daughters married, Mary becoming the wife of Charles Huston, who for a number of years adjourned the bench of the Supreme Court of this state; Ellen, the wife of Thomas Burnside, who was a member of Congress, judge of the Court of Common Pleas and finally a Justice of the Supreme Court; Sarah, wife of Benjamin Harris, whose daughter, Miss Ellen harris, resides on Spring Street in Bellefonte; Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Alexander, a carpenter and builder, who erected one of the first dwellings in Williamsport, at the corner of what is now Pine and Third Streets in that city, many of whose descendants still live in Lycoming County. Mrs. Potter continued with her mother's family in Lycoming County, frequently visiting her two sisters, Mrs. Huston and Mrs. Burnside, who resided in Bellefonte, where in1815she was united in marriage by Rev. James Linn with William W. Potter, a young and rising lawyer and son of General James Potter, one of the early settlers of this county. Here with her husband until his death and then upon the marriage of her niece, Miss Lucy Alexander with Edward C. Humes, she made her home, having lived continuously in this town since her marriage. From Publications of the Genealogical Society of Penna. Vol. XIV, p. 27, abstracts of Wills of Northumberland County. June 11, 1794. Letters of Administration on the estate of James Campbell were granted to Jean Campbell and Samuel Reed. Sureties Robert Martin and John Winter.

Ibid p. 27 Will of William Winter of Loyalsock Township, County of Northumberland. Will dated June 18, 1794, proved August 2, 1794. Wife of Eleanor to have use of my negro Tom. Henry Miller, husband of my daughter Hannah. Daughter Jane Campbell the house and garden she now holds. Daughter Phebe Jones and her children 200 acres adjoining the tract I gave my son William. Thomas Linkorn (Lincoln, my son-in-law. Daughter Ann, wife of George Crawford. Sons John, James, Elias, and Archibald; daughter of Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth, Eleanor and Lucy. Grandson Thomas Linkhorn (Lincoln) a bond. Land in Kentucky patented in my name. Sons William, John, and James. Executors son John Winter and William Hammond, Esq. Witnesses Samuel E Grier, William Vanderbilt and Isiah Voras.

From "Chronicles of Central Pennsylvania" by Godcharles William W. Winter, native of New Jersey, died June 29, 1794, Aged 66 years, 3 months and 2 days. Had two wives and 19 children. Buried in old cemetery near Corner of Third and Rose Streets, Williamsport. From " The Williamsport Sun", Tuesday, March 15, 1949. Miss Gertrude Allen, one of the oldest residents of Montoursville, and descendant of one of Williamsport's earliest settlers, died Monday, March 14, 1949, at the of her niece, Mrs. William Schenck, of 29 North Arch Street, Montoursville. Miss Allen was 89 years old. She was the great-great granddaughter of William Winter. William Winter was one of the first settlers in what is now Williamsport. He had taken up lands and made improvements on a plot east of Lycoming Creek and was among those driven out by the Indian troubles of the Revolution. In the Summer of 1778, following the Big Runaway, in which the West Branch Valley was vacated, and the tardy dispatch of troops to guard the valley, Winter and others returned from Berks County to his home site, for the purpose of cutting hay to feed stock he intended bringing up in the Fall. Some of the men were in the field near the river cutting hay and others were at the cabin when a party of Indians attacked, killing four of the mowers. Winter was among those at the cabin. They hid themselves in the woods until night and were not detected by the Indians. They found the bodies of their slain companions, covered them with hay and hurried back to the protection of downriver points. Next Spring, returning to the scene, they found that the bodies had been prserved beneath the hay, according to an account of Meginnes' "Otzinachson." The victims of this attack were buried, with other massacre victims, at Fourth and Cemetery Streets. Miss Allen traced the descent from this pioneer through Sarah Winter, a daughter by the second marriage of William Winter. His first wife had been Annie Boone, through whom President Lincoln traced descent.

Through various marriages, the family traces ties with two justices of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court; Charles Huston, of Lycoming County and Thomas Burnside, of Clinton and Centre Counties; with Elias Winter, early sheriff of Lycoming County; and with William W. Potter, congressman of a century ago. From "Otzinachson", a History of the West Branch of the Susquehanna. Court held at the home or barn of Eleanor Winter near the present corner of West Fourth and Rose Streets, Williamsport. Records show that on September 11, 1797, the commissioners issued an order to pay Mrs. Winter $30 rent for holding three courts. From "Gazette & Bulletin", Williamsport, Feb. 22, 1909 by Col. Thomas W. Lloyed. On file at James V. Brown Library, Williamsport. Time: March 2, 1909 "Life in Early Williamsport" - from Rose Street west to Lycoming Creek. Originally, this was a farm known as "Ormeskirk", consisting of 579 acres, deeded to one Richard Peters, a close friend of William Penn. On November 23, 1772, Peters sold it to Philip Francis, a cousin of the celebrated Englishman, Sir Philip Frances, an author. Amariah Sutton obtained the west half of the farm, adjacent to Lycoming Creek, south to the river. Sutton's home stood on the east bank of the creek, near the main road to Jersey Shore. He formed, in 1791, the first methodist Society north of Northumberland. Turbott Francis sold the east part of the farm to Hawkins Boone in 1775, and William Winter, the first settler in Williamsport, came in possession of it in 1778. His orginal log house stood near West Fourth and Rose Streets. When Captain Hawkins Boone was killed in 1779, he deeded his half to William Winter. William Winter raised a large family of fifteen children (sic) at his homestead in williamsport.

One of the interesting stories of the family came when a son, John Winter, married Miss Ellen Harris. Their honeymoon included a trip to Steuben County, New York. Enroute Young John decided it would be nice to show his wife the life in a maple sugar camp at Ralston. Workers in camp busy boiling sugar when the newlyweds arrived. John Winter made his arrival rather auspicious by dressing as an Indian, and along with several of his cronies, charged the camp by yelling like savages. One of the young men working at the camp was so shaken by the surprise attack that he fled all the way back to Williamsport, warning the city residents, "the Injuns are comin!". The local settlement was so alarmed that they started to bake extra bread and gather their cattle. Judge Hepburn got his family ready to leave Williamsport when the truth finally arrived that it had all been a prank of the newlyweds. The first courts in this area were held in the Winters home, near Fourth and Rose Streets. They were primitive but legal. Mr. Winter finally sold his home through his heirs to one John Rose, whose daughter later married the distinguished lawyer and jurist, the Hon. Robert C. Grier. This eminent Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States spent many a summer here at the Grier Farm as it was known. Many of the William Winter family made prominent marriages. A daughter married Benjamin Harris, prominent of his time. Another married the Hon. Charles Huston, later Justice of the Supreme Court of the Penna. A son, Elias Winter was Sheriff of the county for several years. Another daughter married the Hon. Thomas Burnside, also a Justice of the Supreme Court of Penna. And Lucy Winter married the Hon. William W. Potter, member of Congress. Following data to be rechecked: Probably taken from "Otzinachson", a History of the West Branch of the Susquehanna. In September, 1787, William Winters came up from Berks County with several men to cut hay in a meadow near the mouth of Lycoming Creek for the purpose of feeding cattle he proposed to bring up late in the Fall. While William Winters, who led the party, was preparing dinner in the cabin, he had built at present corner of Third and Rose Streets, stood their guns against a tree, Indians opened fire, killing three or four the first round. Winters and those with him, hearing the firing, concealed themselves until the Indians had departed, etc.

William Winters family consisted of: Sarah, daughter of Elizabeth Tharp, his first wife who was slain in the massacre, born August 22, 1774, died September 19, 1850. Ruth, born May 23,1763, died date unknown. Martha Reeder, his second wife, born February 24, 1763, Died May 16, 1817. Her children were: Mary, born February 6, 1781, died June 13, 1782. William, Jr., born August 29, 1783, died --------------. Joseph, born September 3, 1786, died July 16, 1870. Martha, born January 13, 1792, died -------------. George Washington, born July 14, 1794, died ---------. John, born June 16, 1797, died ----------. Descendants reside in and around Williamsport.


Hannah (Ann) Boone

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Michael S. Cole; ; copy dated 26 Jan 1994 sent to T Mason; NOTES: 11 children (not listed).


William Winter

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason by Jane Curci [wmcurci@aol.com] on 14 May 2003.

DATA ON WILLIAM WINTER
By J. KENNETH WINTER
From "History of Center and Clinton Counties" by John Blair Linn
Published 1883 by Louis H. Evarts, Center County, page 221
William Potter, Esq., a grandson of General James Potter of the Revolutionary War, was born at Potters Mills, December 18, 1792. Mrs. Lucy Potter, widow of Hon. W. W. Potter, died in Bellefonte, May 30, 1875, aged eighty-four years, nine months and two days. Mrs. Potter a member of a large and rather remarkable family, her father having been born in 1728, married in 1747, died in 1794, children to number of nineteen being born to him, the eldest in 1790, their births extending over a period of forty-two years. William Winter, the father of the deceased, came from Berks County to Northumberland, now Lycoming County, in the year 1778, having purchased the farm lately known as the Judge Grier farm, near what is called Newberry, but within the corporate limits of Williamsport. Mr. Winter was twice married. His first wife was Ann Boone, sister of col. Daniel Boone, famous in the early annals of Kentucky. His marriage took place in the year 1747 in the then province of Virginia. By this union there were issue eleven children, four males and seven females. His eldest daughter, Hannah, married in Rockingham County, Virginia, Abraham Lincoln, the grandfather of the ex-president Lincoln. Shortly before his death, Lincoln, who was killed by the Indians, visited his father-in-law at what is now Williamsport and John Winter, his brother-in-law, returned with him to Kentucky, whither Mr. Lincoln had removed after his marriage, John being deputed to look after some lands taken up by Col. Daniel Boone and his father. They traveled on foot from the farm by a route leading from where Bellefonte now is the "Indian Path from Bald Eagle to Frankstown". John Winter visited his sister, Mrs. Potter, in 1843, and wandering to the hill upon which the academy is situated, a messenger was sent for him, his friends thinking he had lost himself, but he was only looking for the path he and Lincoln had trod sixty years before, and pointed with his finger the course from Spring Creek along Buffalo Run to where it crosses the "Long Limestone Valley" as being their route. Upon the death of Mr. Winter's first wife, in the year 1771, he again in 1774 married. His second wife was Ellen Campbell, who bore him eight children, three males and five females, of whom the latter, the subject of this sketch, was the youngest. The farther of Mrs. Potter died in 1794, and in 1795, Mrs. Ellen Winter, his widow, was licensed by the Courts of Lycoming County to "keep a house of entertainment" where Williamsport now is, where she lived and reared her children as well as several of her step-children. Here all her daughters married, Mary becoming the wife of Charles Huston, who for a number of years adjourned the bench of the Supreme Court of this state; Ellen, the wife of Thomas Burnside, who was a member of Congress, judge of the Court of Common Pleas and finally a Justice of the Supreme Court; Sarah, wife of Benjamin Harris, whose daughter, Miss Ellen harris, resides on Spring Street in Bellefonte; Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Alexander, a carpenter and builder, who erected one of the first dwellings in Williamsport, at the corner of what is now Pine and Third Streets in that city, many of whose descendants still live in Lycoming County. Mrs. Potter continued with her mother's family in Lycoming County, frequently visiting her two sisters, Mrs. Huston and Mrs. Burnside, who resided in Bellefonte, where in1815she was united in marriage by Rev. James Linn with William W. Potter, a young and rising lawyer and son of General James Potter, one of the early settlers of this county. Here with her husband until his death and then upon the marriage of her niece, Miss Lucy Alexander with Edward C. Humes, she made her home, having lived continuously in this town since her marriage. From Publications of the Genealogical Society of Penna. Vol. XIV, p. 27, abstracts of Wills of Northumberland County. June 11, 1794. Letters of Administration on the estate of James Campbell were granted to Jean Campbell and Samuel Reed. Sureties Robert Martin and John Winter.

Ibid p. 27 Will of William Winter of Loyalsock Township, County of Northumberland. Will dated June 18, 1794, proved August 2, 1794. Wife of Eleanor to have use of my negro Tom. Henry Miller, husband of my daughter Hannah. Daughter Jane Campbell the house and garden she now holds. Daughter Phebe Jones and her children 200 acres adjoining the tract I gave my son William. Thomas Linkorn (Lincoln, my son-in-law. Daughter Ann, wife of George Crawford. Sons John, James, Elias, and Archibald; daughter of Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth, Eleanor and Lucy. Grandson Thomas Linkhorn (Lincoln) a bond. Land in Kentucky patented in my name. Sons William, John, and James. Executors son John Winter and William Hammond, Esq. Witnesses Samuel E Grier, William Vanderbilt and Isiah Voras.

From "Chronicles of Central Pennsylvania" by Godcharles William W. Winter, native of New Jersey, died June 29, 1794, Aged 66 years, 3 months and 2 days. Had two wives and 19 children. Buried in old cemetery near Corner of Third and Rose Streets, Williamsport. From " The Williamsport Sun", Tuesday, March 15, 1949. Miss Gertrude Allen, one of the oldest residents of Montoursville, and descendant of one of Williamsport's earliest settlers, died Monday, March 14, 1949, at the of her niece, Mrs. William Schenck, of 29 North Arch Street, Montoursville. Miss Allen was 89 years old. She was the great-great granddaughter of William Winter. William Winter was one of the first settlers in what is now Williamsport. He had taken up lands and made improvements on a plot east of Lycoming Creek and was among those driven out by the Indian troubles of the Revolution. In the Summer of 1778, following the Big Runaway, in which the West Branch Valley was vacated, and the tardy dispatch of troops to guard the valley, Winter and others returned from Berks County to his home site, for the purpose of cutting hay to feed stock he intended bringing up in the Fall. Some of the men were in the field near the river cutting hay and others were at the cabin when a party of Indians attacked, killing four of the mowers. Winter was among those at the cabin. They hid themselves in the woods until night and were not detected by the Indians. They found the bodies of their slain companions, covered them with hay and hurried back to the protection of downriver points. Next Spring, returning to the scene, they found that the bodies had been prserved beneath the hay, according to an account of Meginnes' "Otzinachson." The victims of this attack were buried, with other massacre victims, at Fourth and Cemetery Streets. Miss Allen traced the descent from this pioneer through Sarah Winter, a daughter by the second marriage of William Winter. His first wife had been Annie Boone, through whom President Lincoln traced descent.

Through various marriages, the family traces ties with two justices of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court; Charles Huston, of Lycoming County and Thomas Burnside, of Clinton and Centre Counties; with Elias Winter, early sheriff of Lycoming County; and with William W. Potter, congressman of a century ago. From "Otzinachson", a History of the West Branch of the Susquehanna. Court held at the home or barn of Eleanor Winter near the present corner of West Fourth and Rose Streets, Williamsport. Records show that on September 11, 1797, the commissioners issued an order to pay Mrs. Winter $30 rent for holding three courts. From "Gazette & Bulletin", Williamsport, Feb. 22, 1909 by Col. Thomas W. Lloyed. On file at James V. Brown Library, Williamsport. Time: March 2, 1909 "Life in Early Williamsport" - from Rose Street west to Lycoming Creek. Originally, this was a farm known as "Ormeskirk", consisting of 579 acres, deeded to one Richard Peters, a close friend of William Penn. On November 23, 1772, Peters sold it to Philip Francis, a cousin of the celebrated Englishman, Sir Philip Frances, an author. Amariah Sutton obtained the west half of the farm, adjacent to Lycoming Creek, south to the river. Sutton's home stood on the east bank of the creek, near the main road to Jersey Shore. He formed, in 1791, the first methodist Society north of Northumberland. Turbott Francis sold the east part of the farm to Hawkins Boone in 1775, and William Winter, the first settler in Williamsport, came in possession of it in 1778. His orginal log house stood near West Fourth and Rose Streets. When Captain Hawkins Boone was killed in 1779, he deeded his half to William Winter. William Winter raised a large family of fifteen children (sic) at his homestead in williamsport.

One of the interesting stories of the family came when a son, John Winter, married Miss Ellen Harris. Their honeymoon included a trip to Steuben County, New York. Enroute Young John decided it would be nice to show his wife the life in a maple sugar camp at Ralston. Workers in camp busy boiling sugar when the newlyweds arrived. John Winter made his arrival rather auspicious by dressing as an Indian, and along with several of his cronies, charged the camp by yelling like savages. One of the young men working at the camp was so shaken by the surprise attack that he fled all the way back to Williamsport, warning the city residents, "the Injuns are comin!". The local settlement was so alarmed that they started to bake extra bread and gather their cattle. Judge Hepburn got his family ready to leave Williamsport when the truth finally arrived that it had all been a prank of the newlyweds. The first courts in this area were held in the Winters home, near Fourth and Rose Streets. They were primitive but legal. Mr. Winter finally sold his home through his heirs to one John Rose, whose daughter later married the distinguished lawyer and jurist, the Hon. Robert C. Grier. This eminent Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States spent many a summer here at the Grier Farm as it was known. Many of the William Winter family made prominent marriages. A daughter married Benjamin Harris, prominent of his time. Another married the Hon. Charles Huston, later Justice of the Supreme Court of the Penna. A son, Elias Winter was Sheriff of the county for several years. Another daughter married the Hon. Thomas Burnside, also a Justice of the Supreme Court of Penna. And Lucy Winter married the Hon. William W. Potter, member of Congress. Following data to be rechecked: Probably taken from "Otzinachson", a History of the West Branch of the Susquehanna. In September, 1787, William Winters came up from Berks County with several men to cut hay in a meadow near the mouth of Lycoming Creek for the purpose of feeding cattle he proposed to bring up late in the Fall. While William Winters, who led the party, was preparing dinner in the cabin, he had built at present corner of Third and Rose Streets, stood their guns against a tree, Indians opened fire, killing three or four the first round. Winters and those with him, hearing the firing, concealed themselves until the Indians had departed, etc.

William Winters family consisted of: Sarah, daughter of Elizabeth Tharp, his first wife who was slain in the massacre, born August 22, 1774, died September 19, 1850. Ruth, born May 23,1763, died date unknown. Martha Reeder, his second wife, born February 24, 1763, Died May 16, 1817. Her children were: Mary, born February 6, 1781, died June 13, 1782. William, Jr., born August 29, 1783, died --------------. Joseph, born September 3, 1786, died July 16, 1870. Martha, born January 13, 1792, died -------------. George Washington, born July 14, 1794, died ---------. John, born June 16, 1797, died ----------. Descendants reside in and around Williamsport.


Eleanor Campbell

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Michael S. Cole, [HYPERLINK http://www.thecolefamily.com/hobby/ahnentafel.htm#ahnentafel ] ; ; copy dated 26 Jan 1994 sent to T Mason; NOTES: 8 children (not listed).