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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Rev. Luther Mason Dimmitt

MEMORIAL MINUTE ON THE REVEREND DON B. ALLEN

September 27, 1889-June 9, 1966

The Rev. Don P. Allen, author and research specialist, died on June 9, 1966 of a heart attack while en route from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to his home in Carmel, California. He was in his seventy-seventh year.

Born in Kansas City, Missouri, on September 27, 1889, he graduated from Westminster College, in 1920. He earned the Th.M. degree from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1922 and the M.A. degree from the University of Texas in 1924. He also did graduate study at the University of Pennsylvania and at Columbia University. He was ordained by the Presbytery of Kansas City in September, 1917.

In an active and productive professional career covering more than fifty years he displayed his unusual gifts in writing and research as well as an unfailing devotion to the educational and missionary causes of the church. For six years prior to his graduation from college he engaged in missionary service in Minnesota and Missouri. His subsequent career had four principal phases, though not in an exact chronological sequence.

For seven years he served in three universities -- at Oregon State Agricultural College as Secretary of the Student Y.M.C.A.; at the University of Texas, first as University Pastor and later as Instructor in Educational Psychology; and at Duke University as Assistant Professor of Education. A second phase was concerned with Christian Education and Theological Education. This included service as Secretary of the Presbyterian Committee of Christian Education at Louisville, Kentucky; service on the staff of the Board of Christian Education, first as assistant editor of youth publications, then as General Director of the Department of Educational Research and as Director of the Department of Student Aid; and finally as Research Secretary for a Special Committee of the General Assembly on Theological Education. In the latter assignment, he made a thorough analysis of each of our Presbyterian Seminaries, providing the factual ground work for the very significant report which was adopted by the General Assembly in 1943.

The third phase of his career was concerned with National Missions. Serving first on the staff of the Board's Division of Educational and Medical Work (from which he was released for the study of Theological Education), he then served as director of historical research for the Board, continuing in this work until his retirement at the end of 1959.

This assignment led naturally into the fourth phase of his career. In preparation for the Board's sesquicentennial celebration in 1952, he wrote the script and was chiefly responsible for the production of the historical motion picture And Now Tomorrow. In collaboration with his wife, Mrs. Terry Allen, he wrote the dramatic story of the pioneer missionary, Dr. Marcus Whitman, published under the title "Doctor in Buckskin".

The writing team of husband and wife, writing under the pen name of T.D. Allen, produced other books closely related in theme to the work of National Missions. Notable among these were Troubled Border, and Navajos Have Five Fingers. They also produced material for films and for use on Television.

Through much of his earlier service he was known by his original name of Luther M. Dimmitt. Later he formally adopted the name, Don B. Allen, which he used in his literary and film work.

He combined to a rare degree historical accuracy and sensitivity, literary skill, and deep personal devotion to the work of the church, which enabled him to make a unique contribution to the causes which he served so well through more than half a century.

Prepared by:
REV. HERMANN N. MORSE


Terril Diener Allen

OBITUARY:
CARMEL, CA – Terry Diener Allen, author/educator, resident of Carmel since 1943 has passed away, several months after her 100th birthday.
  Terry was born in Douglas, OK, and educated at Phillips University in Enid, OK, University of Chicago, and with two graduate degrees from Yale University, distinguished as the first woman to graduate from the Yale University School of Divinity. She referred to herself as a perennial goer to school. Graduate work was also performed at Columbia, New York University, University of OK, UCLA, Stanford, and later in life, she was almost constantly a student at Monterey Peninsula College in painting, sculpture and jewelry. She is the widow of co-author, Don B. Allen. Their historic Carmel home on Hatton Rd. was once on the tour bus route, pointed out as "the home of the famous husband-wife writing team of Don and Terry Allen".
  Professional activities included, Editor, Young People's Materials, Presbyterian Church USA; free-lance author, co-author, editor of 25-30 novels and nonfiction books. She was best known for Doctor In Buckskin, and Navajos Have Five Fingers. Her permanent literary collection is located at the University of Oregon. She founded the Department of Creative Writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, NM in 1963. She taught there five years, followed by ten years of traveling to Indian and Eskimo schools from upper Alaska to Mississippi, and from coast to coast as Director of Communications Skills for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She also was a Professor of Creative Writing at the University of California at Santa Cruz. She received a Distinguished Alumna Award, Phillips University, OK in 1970, and established and endowed the David M. Diener Scholarship at Yale University, named after her father.
  While in Carmel, she was a founding member of the Carmel Presbyterian Church, charter member of The Carmel Foundation, charter member of The Monterey Bay Aquarium, member of Monterey Museum of Art and long-time contributor of paintings to the Christmas Tree drawing, member of The Community Hospital Auxiliary, Friends of the Hospice, Carmel Library Association, and Monterey Peninsula Watercolor Society. Her loves in life, included physical fitness, fashion tailoring, nutrition and cooking, gardening, opera, travel, playing Scrabble, reading, writing and painting, and most importantly, her friends and family that she endeared.
  Memorial donations may be made to the Hospice of the Central Coast, Monterey, CA.

!Published in The Monterey Herald on Nov. 12, 2008


Rev. Luther Mason Dimmitt

MEMORIAL MINUTE ON THE REVEREND DON B. ALLEN

September 27, 1889-June 9, 1966

The Rev. Don P. Allen, author and research specialist, died on June 9, 1966 of a heart attack while en route from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to his home in Carmel, California. He was in his seventy-seventh year.

Born in Kansas City, Missouri, on September 27, 1889, he graduated from Westminster College, in 1920. He earned the Th.M. degree from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1922 and the M.A. degree from the University of Texas in 1924. He also did graduate study at the University of Pennsylvania and at Columbia University. He was ordained by the Presbytery of Kansas City in September, 1917.

In an active and productive professional career covering more than fifty years he displayed his unusual gifts in writing and research as well as an unfailing devotion to the educational and missionary causes of the church. For six years prior to his graduation from college he engaged in missionary service in Minnesota and Missouri. His subsequent career had four principal phases, though not in an exact chronological sequence.

For seven years he served in three universities -- at Oregon State Agricultural College as Secretary of the Student Y.M.C.A.; at the University of Texas, first as University Pastor and later as Instructor in Educational Psychology; and at Duke University as Assistant Professor of Education. A second phase was concerned with Christian Education and Theological Education. This included service as Secretary of the Presbyterian Committee of Christian Education at Louisville, Kentucky; service on the staff of the Board of Christian Education, first as assistant editor of youth publications, then as General Director of the Department of Educational Research and as Director of the Department of Student Aid; and finally as Research Secretary for a Special Committee of the General Assembly on Theological Education. In the latter assignment, he made a thorough analysis of each of our Presbyterian Seminaries, providing the factual ground work for the very significant report which was adopted by the General Assembly in 1943.

The third phase of his career was concerned with National Missions. Serving first on the staff of the Board's Division of Educational and Medical Work (from which he was released for the study of Theological Education), he then served as director of historical research for the Board, continuing in this work until his retirement at the end of 1959.

This assignment led naturally into the fourth phase of his career. In preparation for the Board's sesquicentennial celebration in 1952, he wrote the script and was chiefly responsible for the production of the historical motion picture And Now Tomorrow. In collaboration with his wife, Mrs. Terry Allen, he wrote the dramatic story of the pioneer missionary, Dr. Marcus Whitman, published under the title "Doctor in Buckskin".

The writing team of husband and wife, writing under the pen name of T.D. Allen, produced other books closely related in theme to the work of National Missions. Notable among these were Troubled Border, and Navajos Have Five Fingers. They also produced material for films and for use on Television.

Through much of his earlier service he was known by his original name of Luther M. Dimmitt. Later he formally adopted the name, Don B. Allen, which he used in his literary and film work.

He combined to a rare degree historical accuracy and sensitivity, literary skill, and deep personal devotion to the work of the church, which enabled him to make a unique contribution to the causes which he served so well through more than half a century.

Prepared by:
REV. HERMANN N. MORSE