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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Walter Max Kolleschnig

BIOGRAPHY: GEDCOM from Ed Suder to T.Mason; Dec 1998; ; Notes: Walter was raised in Kansas City, Mo. He had a paper route at a young age and the family even had a milk cow. He learned the jewelry trade at age 12. Walter did not have a good relationship with his mother and portrayed her as a greedy women that was always after what little money Walter had. A story that Walter often told was that when he tried to enlist in the army, the recruiter asked him his age. Walter truthfully replied "Seventeen". The recruiter declared that Walter was too young to enlist, so Walter promptly got in the end of the next line and replied "Eighteen" when asked by the second recruiter. Walter was in the army! He fought in World War I in France, though he never talked about it much. He was, however, active in the WWI veteran's organization all of his life. Walter was a member of the re-Organized Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints, although he wasn't very active in the church in his later years. He was also an active member of the Mason's Lodge and was active in Masonic work. He was about 5'10", 170-pounds, brown eyes and lost most of his hair as he aged. He was a heavy cigarette smoker, starting in WWI and smoking about 2 packs a day the rest of his life. He was a serious man with little tolerance for silliness or games. Walter decided to become a lawyer, passing the bar exam in 1935 in Austin, Texas after attending the YMCA night law school, sponsored by the Southern Methodist University School of Law. He practiced law for several months and then was appointed as an assistant district attorney representing Dallas County. After several years, Walter left law and returned to work as a jeweler (diamond setter) which he practiced until his 70's. Walter was considered a fine craftsman in the jewelry business. He made many pieces of jewelry as gifts for his wife and two daughters. One day, while waiting for a bus, Walter suffered a serious heart attack caused in part, by his heavy smoking. The paramedics revived him, but some brain damage had already occurred. Though he lived several years after the heart attack, he was never quite the same.


Bertha Odasa Burden

BIOGRAPHY: GEDCOM from Ed Suder to T.Mason; Dec 1998; ; Notes: Bertha was the oldest of nine children, of which the first five were born at home with the help of mid-wives. The Burden family was poor but didn't know any better. Bertha's memories were of a happy childhood where she had a doll collection and a good friend in her younger sister, Cynthia. Cynthia and Bertha remained very close. Bertha had hazel eyes and was about 130 pounds at 5'2". She graduated from the Sacred Heart Catholic school and attended business school. She was employed by the Hesse Envelope company as a press operator making envelopes, then as a payroll clerk. She attended night school about 1922-23 to learn to use the comptometer calculator. Her next employer was the phone company from 1929 to 1938. Next, came raising her two daughters and being a homemaker. Bertha was active in the East Grand Baptist Church and belonged to several social organizations including the WWI veterans. Her hobbies were arts and crafts, gardening, knitting and going places with her friends.


Walter Max Kolleschnig

BIOGRAPHY: GEDCOM from Ed Suder to T.Mason; Dec 1998; ; Notes: Walter was raised in Kansas City, Mo. He had a paper route at a young age and the family even had a milk cow. He learned the jewelry trade at age 12. Walter did not have a good relationship with his mother and portrayed her as a greedy women that was always after what little money Walter had. A story that Walter often told was that when he tried to enlist in the army, the recruiter asked him his age. Walter truthfully replied "Seventeen". The recruiter declared that Walter was too young to enlist, so Walter promptly got in the end of the next line and replied "Eighteen" when asked by the second recruiter. Walter was in the army! He fought in World War I in France, though he never talked about it much. He was, however, active in the WWI veteran's organization all of his life. Walter was a member of the re-Organized Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints, although he wasn't very active in the church in his later years. He was also an active member of the Mason's Lodge and was active in Masonic work. He was about 5'10", 170-pounds, brown eyes and lost most of his hair as he aged. He was a heavy cigarette smoker, starting in WWI and smoking about 2 packs a day the rest of his life. He was a serious man with little tolerance for silliness or games. Walter decided to become a lawyer, passing the bar exam in 1935 in Austin, Texas after attending the YMCA night law school, sponsored by the Southern Methodist University School of Law. He practiced law for several months and then was appointed as an assistant district attorney representing Dallas County. After several years, Walter left law and returned to work as a jeweler (diamond setter) which he practiced until his 70's. Walter was considered a fine craftsman in the jewelry business. He made many pieces of jewelry as gifts for his wife and two daughters. One day, while waiting for a bus, Walter suffered a serious heart attack caused in part, by his heavy smoking. The paramedics revived him, but some brain damage had already occurred. Though he lived several years after the heart attack, he was never quite the same.


Charles Lee Burden

BIOGRAPHY: GEDCOM from Ed Suder to T.Mason; Dec 1998; ; Notes: Charles grew up in the beautiful hills around Sparta, Tennessee. At the age of 14, he went to work in the coal mines along with his brothers and father. The family moved to Texas in 1897. He was employed by the City of Dallas water department in the early 1900's. He was a plumber and was foreman of all of the water department's water meters from the 1920's until 1945. Charles suffered from alcoholism, diabetes and prostate cancer but finally died of a heart attack.


Hattie Lula Edwards

Hattie was 1/16 Cherokee (or possibly Chocktaw) Indian. Hattie died of Bladder Cancer.