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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


William Beck Borden

DEATH-CHILDREN-MARRIAGE-BIOGRAPHY: Obituary, Denison newspaper; ; Copy in Benjamin J. Borden's file in possession of T. Mason; Descendant was almost 92, and had resided at Denison for 34 years. Passed away at home of his dau, Mrs. Thomas Boldrick where he and his wife have made their home for a number of years. Descendant was remarkably vigorous and active for one of his years up to his fatal illness which dated from an attack of grip three months ago. ... Funeral services were conducted at his late home, followed by a public service at the First M.E. Church. A large concourse of sorrowing friends and relatives followed the cortage to Oakwood Cemetery, where the remains were interred beside relatives. William Beck Borden was born near Raleigh, N.C. Sept. 26, 1815. In 1836 he moved to Little Rock, Ark. where he lived the greater part of his life. It was here that in 1843 he was happily married to Miss Mary A. Butterworth, an English girl. During the war he was quartermaster in the Confederate service and rendered very timely service, keeping boys in gray in clothing and provisions. He was Mayor of Van Buren, Ark. and also served as Sheriff in the district for several years. After the close of the Civil War, in 1873, the family moved to Denison, where they have continuously resided ever since. Mr Borden was a dry good's merchant most of his life, but when first coming to this city was connected with the old Alamo Hotel. He was ever a public spirited citizen and on the alert to enter into everything for the good of this city. His life, though led quietly, was a very interesting one, and he commanded the love and respect of all with whom he came in contact. About ten years ago he wrote a sketch of his life, which was read this afternoon at his funeral. His long life was a shining example of Christian faith, and he early united with the Methodist church, in which he held communion to the last. He was raised in the Southern Methodist Church, but united with the M.E. Church when coming here on account of that being the only organization of that demonination. Mr. Borden was a "Mason" in early days but did not transefer his membership to this place when coming to Texas. Survived by his aged wife. Mourning his death are 3 children, 9 grandchildren, 4 ggchildren. They had 7 children. The elder son died in early childhood and is buried at Little Rock. The other son and a daughter, Mrs. Lottie Swain are buried here in Oakwood cemetery. The surviving children are: Mrs. Thomas Boldrick of Denison, Mrs. Edward Grier, of Vancouver, B.C., Mrs. Sallie Bray of Denison. The grandchildren are: J.E. George and T.R. Boldrick, E.C. Bray, Walter Bray, Mrs. T.E. Williams and Mrs. N.B. Kinder, all of this city, William Bray of Little Rock, Ark. and Harry Bray of Spokane, Wash. The great-grandchildren are: Masters Roland and Russell Williams, Miss Ruth Williams, children of Mr. & Mrs. T. Z. Williams and Master Edward Charles Bray Jr, son of Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Bray, all of this city.

DEED: Page 248 Record Deed, Prairie County, AR.
John Butterworth and wife Rebekah for $70 do grant and sell to William B. Borden, of the same county the following described tract of land situate in the County of Prairie the NE quarter of section __. Township ___ from the north range ___ (hard to read) and six acres together with all improvements thereupon situate. In the presence of witiness Wm. W. Barton and Joseph Butterworth at Rochdale, Lancashire, England. 10 Feb 1850.


Mary Anne Butterworth

DEATH-NAME: Letter from Ernest Boldrick, (Jan. 1991) age 72. "Little Granny" lived with Thomas and Eliza after her father died. First they lived at Denison, then in San Diego. Died of flu at age 92. There is a granite marker "Borden" on the plot. It is similar to the Boldrick monument at San Diego's Greenwood Cemetery.

Ernest says that Thomas Butterworth brought from Rochdale (near Manchester), England, the technique for making cordage and he had a facility which produced same in Prarie Co. AR.

Listed in the 1910 Census with her son-in-law as head of family (which see in his source information). In all other census records indicates she had 7 children but in 1910 it is recorded as 6. Her husband's obituary indicated they had 7 children.


Borden

See father's obituary.


James Levi Borden

Died young.

The 1860 census indicates James L. age 3. The 1880 census indicates Jas age 15.


Thomas Butterworth

IMMIGRATED: With children Charles and Mary Ann to Prairie Co. Arkansas in 1830 and became cotton farmers. In the 19th century several Butterworths were prominent affluent weavers. This work was carried on in the home. Some were rope makers of which there were three firms in Rochdale. Rope making is a form of weaving and cotton is believed to have been the fibre. The Industrial Revolution developed the power loom in 1780 causing great upheaval. Bands of men broke into factories and broke up the looms. Manchester is described in Dickens' HARD TIMES. The people lived in clouds of coal smoke from the steam producing boilers for the weaving mills. They worked long hours and had to scratch to stay alive. Crowded conditions made life a burden. Anarchy occurred in Lancashire. The success of the power loom increased the need for cotton and a source was the southern United States. There was reasons to move and Thomas had the funds to enable he, his wife and their children to move to Arkansas. By 1856 when Thomas died during an influenza epidemic there were only two children with them. Thomas the physician had lost his wife and returned to Rochdale.

CENSUS: From Arkansas Historical Commission: 1850 Census, Arkansas, County Prairie, Township Caroline, Page 304: Thomas Butterworth, 62, farmer, $500 value of real estate owned. No other entry.


Thomas William Boldrick

MARRIAGE: January 30,1996. Gail Boldrick Farnsworth advised there was a marriage of Thomas BALDRICK to Mary Jane Duffin 24 Feb 1870, Thurlow Township. Index to Ontario Registrations, Book 2, Vol 4, p 245.

IMMIGRATION: Thomas and three brother moved to the United States. Thomas to Texas, the others to Iowa, Colorado, and Oregon. A cousin settled in Kentucky and a younger cousin, Sam, followed Thomas to Denison, Texas. His residence was on Gandy between Fannin and Mirick streets. The home was demolished when the birthplace of Pres. Eisenhower, located next door, was developed into a public attraction.

OCCUPATION: Operated hardware and shoe stores and had disastrous grain speculations. Built 5 story building in Denison and in the 1892 money panic forced a bankrupcy. "Was proclaimed tallest building west of Mississippi".

In March of 1898, when 52 years old, he traveled to the Klondike with two friends. Copies of his diary, written during this trip, have been given to the grandsons. The diary describes severe hardships of landing at Dyea, of climbing the Chilcoot pass of making trees into lumber and builting their boats. They suffered with severe weather and hordes of mosquitoes. He quit the search for gold on the fifteenth of July 1898. He was waist deep in the water of a creek. The diary ended. He headed down the Yukon River to the Bearing Sea, Seattle and his Texas home. Ralph Boldrick has learned (Dec 1994) from the Dawson City Museum that there is a record of Thomas marking a mining claim July 18, 1898 on Black River Creek. The claim date of recording was July 19, 1898 and carries his signature. It may be the only example of his signature?

Moved to San Diego, CA in 1912. Helped his sons Tom, George, and John in shoe stores.

Was six feet tall and weighed probably over 200 pounds. Had a drooping mustache and pretty good head of iron grey hair. Favored dark clothing and a large wide brim, black felt hat of the type worn in the west.

DEATH: Died of hardening of the arteries.


Mary Eliza Borden

NOTES: Memories of Ernest Herlong Bolderick. When coming home from high school on a sunny afternoon, I would find my grandmother sitting in our porch swing and remark about what a fine afternoon we were having. Her response, "It (the beautiful day) is a terror to snakes". Her outlook seemed to be cantakerous and sour.

In the years I knew her she had a live-in person to care for her needs. Occasionaly there was a trip, by streetcar, to town for shopping and lunch at the Vegetarian Cafeteria (operated by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church). She always had and read the afternoon newspaper. I believe she maintained correspondence as I can recall her using a Corona portable typewriter.

She was nearly doubled over with what we called curviture of the spine-almost a hunchback. The left shoulder bulged. She could not stand erect. She was sort of dimunitative and frail probably less than five feet in height, weighing less than a hunded pounds and very bent over. Her face was narrow and her eyes prominent if not bulging. She had a prominent high brow and good head of hair. In her later years she was deaf and thereby hangs a tale. She had been avoiding church attendance, saying she could not hear the service. A hearing aid device was installed and a special demonstration was arranged. She was seated and holding the hearing device to her ear and looking down at the back of the pew ahead of her. The minister was in the pulpit saying a prayer. When the prayer ended she lowered the hearing aid and proclaimed she had not heard anything.

Apparently she enjoyed good health and so far as is known never had a serious illness nor was she ever hospitalized. In her later years she twice tripped and fell down the flight of 12 stairs for her apartment. Her glasses were broken, she was bruised and sore but she was not broken.

She "always" had a package of Wrigleys PK gum (small oblong chunks with white sugar coating) for any children.

I do not recall any meals being prepared by her, I have no idea if she had any cooking skills. She must have been skilled with needle and thread having operated a milinary shop in her Denison, Texas days. I recall large wooden chests which had many spools of thread from her days as a milinar as well as a dress form in our atic storage area. These items and beds, chairs and feather beds had been shipped in a chartered box car when she and Tom moved to San Diego about 1912-15.

Eliza followed the Methodist faith.

DEATH: date provided by Ernest Herlong Boldrick.


Marriage Notes for Thomas William Boldrick and Mary Eliza Borden-979

In 1998 Ernest Boldrick indicates marriage date was 11 May 1875, and marriage took place in Sherman, Grayson, Texas.


John Boldrick

REF: Geo. Smyth BOLDRICK Family Tree ca. 1963 quoted by E.H. Boldrick; 1892 Magdalene Way; San Diego, Ca 92110-3507 on 22 Aug 1990.

EMMIGRATION: Irish Passenger Lists; FHL 941.5W2m; John Baldrick, age 20, to Quebec 1859. Sailed from Liverpool to the St. Laurence River and granted land in Canada.

CENSUS: 1871; Thurlow Twp, Hastings Co, District 61, sub-district a-2; page 76; reel-9992. Age 63, Ireland, Methodist E., married.


Thomas William Boldrick

MARRIAGE: January 30,1996. Gail Boldrick Farnsworth advised there was a marriage of Thomas BALDRICK to Mary Jane Duffin 24 Feb 1870, Thurlow Township. Index to Ontario Registrations, Book 2, Vol 4, p 245.

IMMIGRATION: Thomas and three brother moved to the United States. Thomas to Texas, the others to Iowa, Colorado, and Oregon. A cousin settled in Kentucky and a younger cousin, Sam, followed Thomas to Denison, Texas. His residence was on Gandy between Fannin and Mirick streets. The home was demolished when the birthplace of Pres. Eisenhower, located next door, was developed into a public attraction.

OCCUPATION: Operated hardware and shoe stores and had disastrous grain speculations. Built 5 story building in Denison and in the 1892 money panic forced a bankrupcy. "Was proclaimed tallest building west of Mississippi".

In March of 1898, when 52 years old, he traveled to the Klondike with two friends. Copies of his diary, written during this trip, have been given to the grandsons. The diary describes severe hardships of landing at Dyea, of climbing the Chilcoot pass of making trees into lumber and builting their boats. They suffered with severe weather and hordes of mosquitoes. He quit the search for gold on the fifteenth of July 1898. He was waist deep in the water of a creek. The diary ended. He headed down the Yukon River to the Bearing Sea, Seattle and his Texas home. Ralph Boldrick has learned (Dec 1994) from the Dawson City Museum that there is a record of Thomas marking a mining claim July 18, 1898 on Black River Creek. The claim date of recording was July 19, 1898 and carries his signature. It may be the only example of his signature?

Moved to San Diego, CA in 1912. Helped his sons Tom, George, and John in shoe stores.

Was six feet tall and weighed probably over 200 pounds. Had a drooping mustache and pretty good head of iron grey hair. Favored dark clothing and a large wide brim, black felt hat of the type worn in the west.

DEATH: Died of hardening of the arteries.


Beatrice Wyatt Harper

In the pdf file shown as an attachment to the record of Chas. S. Butterworth to Mr. Boldrick on 28 Aug 1917, it states on the first page, "I found this letter and the following pages among some old letters that Mother Boldrick had given me - Oct. 11, 1931. These pages are copies of the original as nearly as I could interpret them." Signed Beatrice H. Boldrick, (Mrs. George Francis Boldrick).


John Isaac Hance

DESCENDANTS: Information sent to T.Mason, Feb 2002 by Chuck Borden. As a source he cites "Becky B. Frank March 13, 1999 post to Borden-L@rootsweb.

ERROR: Copy in possession of T.Mason of a letter from William White Hance of Eatontown, N.J. on February 11, 1903 to Mrs. Clayton. EXTRACT: ... Mrs. Weld is again wrong in saying that Joyce Borden married John Isaac Hance, for she there confuses the two brothers, and gives the double name to the one man. John and Elizabeth Hance, the first comers to this county, did have two sons, John and Isaac and one of those sons did marry Joyce Borden, but his name was John and not John Isaac. For proof of which I refer you again to the Gen. Record, where you will find that John Hance and Joyce, his wife, died in 1728/9 and 1722/3 respectively, and are buried in that old Rumson yard.
There may be a substratum of correctness in her statement that John Hance, the son of John and Joyce married into the Borden family. According to the will of John who married Joyce, they did have a son whose name was John. And I have been wholly unable to learn who this third generation John did marry. John the husband of Joyce, in his will refers to Thomas and John as his sons and speaks of daughters but without naming them. ...


Joyce Borden

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Michael S. Cole, [HYPERLINK http://www.thecolefamily.com/hobby/ahnentafel.htm#ahnentafel ] ; ; copy dated 26 Jan 1994 sent to T Mason; NOTES: Johnston's "Rich Borden & Desc," p 1. RESEARCHER: Anna Burr, Bordentown, NJ. 6 children (not listed).


Conoway Scott

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Frank Gibson Thibault Jr, ; dated 19 Apr 1992 sent to T Mason; NOTES: Lillian (Scott) Thibault states that his wife talked like she did not know much about him. Some of his family is buried in the cemetery down the road from Elmhurst (Scott homesteaded Elmhurst plantation). He was quite a bit older than his wife. Don't know cause of death. Died during his wife's pregnancy before son, Conoway was born.

1850 Census lists Pulaski Cnty Eagle township
184 Conway Scott 35 farmer $10,000 KY
Catherine 32 KY
This could be previous wife of an older man.
All others listed in that household are brickmasons, laborers, etc.


Eliza Mere Lawson

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Frank Gibson Thibault Jr,; dated 19 Apr 1992 sent to T Mason; Copy in poss of T. Mason (filed - Levi Borden); NOTES: Arkansas Gazette Newspaper article Sep 22, 1922 "Three of Arkansas' Best Known and Oldest Families" says her father James Lawson, came with his family and the late Moorhead Wright to Arkansas in 1838, when Mrs. Scott was a very small child. Her father settled in Little Rock, afterward moving to his plantation at Bear Skin Lake. Was taken as a bride to beautiful old place on which stood the long, rambling, story-and-a-half house, built of cedar, etc. Original house burned abt 1902, was replaced with modern house where Eliza Lawson Scott now resides with her son, Conoway Scott the well known planter, and his family at Scott, Ark.

REF: Catharine FB Mason says, "Miss Lawson a half sister to Benjamin John Borden, married a Conway and a cousin Liza married SCOTT so that's why the name Conway Scott, her son."

REF: Article in Levi Borden file says, "Eliza Lawson came to Little Rock in 1833 with her father James Lawson when she was a very small child and married Conoway Scott in 1863. Eliza was born in Waynesboro, N.C."

OBITUARY: of Benjamin J. Borden says, "sister - Mrs. James Lawson." Newspaper article, says "Eliza Lawson Scott, b. Waynesboro, NC came to Little Rock in 1833 with her father later moved to Bear Skin Lake Plantation. Eliza married Conoway Scott in 1863 and lived at Scott, Ark." Gives praise for Liza's good works.

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Frank Gibson Thibault Jr,; dated 19 Apr 1992 sent to T Mason;NOTES: Unknown how she got along when husband died. She had farm and child to take care of. Had an old maid sister that had arthritis that lived with her apparently after the death of her husband, sister was aunt Nelle Lawson. Mom thinks her family lived in LR and was married there. Lived in mom's home til her death. Mom states was blind and on crutches but was alert and would recognise people from their voice. Sister Aunt Nelle was in white wicker wheel chair died when mom was 5-6 yr old. Mom states her son was concerned that Mere would loose her mind, but she was clear til her death. Article from some paper with ad on back seems to date it at sept 1922 (about the 4th) gives indication of father and where born and that Lawson's had place at Bearskin lake. Also notes that she was active in Christ Episcopal church in LR and notes close friends, hospitable home she kept, many parties she had, and support for Scott School "Boll Weevil".