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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Edward Payson Borden

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason on 14 Aug 2006 by Richard Denton Borden.

"ACCORDING TO THE 1880 CENSUS IN PHILADELPHIA, PA Edward, then 44 years of age and a dry goods merchant, lived with his son Edward Shirley Borden, age 13 and attending school, his 31 year old niece Martha (Mattie) Johns from Missouri, who kept house, and two domestics; Sarah A. Glasgow, 38 and Mary Mc Golrig 27, both from Ireland. Edward Payson Borden had been married to Jane Amanda Durfee's sister, Margaret, who died rather young. Shirley Borden was their son. John Jay Johns daughter, Mattie(Martha), went to Philadelphia to care for Shirley, after his mother died.

REFERENCE; 1890 Mrs. Anne Glenday Durfee Died, at the residence of her son-in-law, John Jay Johns, in St. Charles, Missouri, on the morning of the Sabbath, April 20, 1890, Mrs. Anne Glenday Durfee, in the 81st year of her age. Thus has passed away one of the few that remain of the early settlers of St. Charles. She was born in New Rattray, Blairgowrie, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1809. She came with her father's family to this place in 1815.
After remaining here several years (6), her father returned to Scotland with his elder daughter Helen, the mother having died. But Anne remained here with her uncle, Thomas Lindsay, who was the father and founder of the Presbyterian Church in St. Charles. Rev. Charles Robinson, of blessed memory, (who was a brother-in-law of Mr. Lindsay's wife), was, next to Rev. Timothy Flint, the first at preacher from the East who lived, labored, preached and taught school, until his death in 1828. Mr. Lindsay’s house was then the headquarters of the preachers who came from the East to labor as missionaries in this new and destitute field. About that time came the Rev. Thomas Russell Durfee, (He was a descendant of Governor William Bradford and of John Alden and Priscilla Mullins.) from Fall River, Mass., a graduate of Amherst College and Andover Seminary. In 1828 he married Anne Glenday.
After spending a few years in missionary labors in this State, with such faithful and apostolic men as John F. Cowan, Cochran and McAfee, he died in August 1833 at Mr. Lindsay's home near Elm Point, leaving his widow with two little daughters, Jane Amanda and Margaret Lindsay. Mrs. Durfee, with her children, remained with her uncle, Mr. Lindsay, until his death In 1843. Mrs. Durfee was a woman of great energy and firmness of character, and the great desire of her heart was that her daughters might have the best education that young women could get at that day. This she accomplished under great pecuniary difficulty and self-denial on her part. Her elder daughter, Jane, was educated at Lindenwood and at Monticello Seminary, the then pioneer female schools of the Southwest, and the younger, Margaret, at Bradford (Mass.) Seminary, spending much time with her father's kindred.
In 1847 her daughter Jane was married to John Jay Johns and ever after Mrs. Durfee made her home with them. Her second daughter, Margaret Lindsay Durfee, was married in 1862 to Mr. Edward Payson Borden of Fall River, Mass. for many years past a prominent merchant of Philadelphia. Mrs. Durfee was an enthusiast on Christian education, and as soon as her grandchildren were old enough, she used all her means, even stinting herself, to secure to them a high Christian education. She succeeded in a great measure in accomplishing that object, and her grandchildren now rise up and call her blessed.

REFERENCE: DURFEE -- Rev. Thomas Durfee came to St. Charles from Fall River, Mass., in 1827. He was a graduate of Brown University, Rhode Island, and of the Theological Seminary at Andover, Mass. In 1828 he was married to Miss Ann Glenday, who was a niece of Thomas Lindsay, and then living with him. Mr. Durfee lived several years after his marriage in Callaway County, as pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Auxvassee. He afterward returned to St. Charles, and was agent of the American Bible Society, and in 1833 -- the great cholera year -- he died at the house of Thomas Lindsay.
Mr. Durfee was a man of great worth and a fine preacher. He left two daughters, Jane S., who afterwards was married to John Jay Johns, and Margaret Lindsay, who is now the wife of E. P. Borden, of Philadelphia.
Mrs. Durfee, after the death of her husband, continued to live with her uncle, Thomas Lindsay, till his death in 1843. At her uncle's death she was, by his will, possessed of his old homestead, where she continued to reside till 1850, when she went to live with her son-in-law, John Jay Johns, with whom she still resides. She is a great enthusiast on the subject of education, and is using her means freely in educating her grand children. Her eldest daughter, Mrs. Johns, was educated at Monticello, Illinois and Mrs. Borden at Bradford Seminary, in Massachusetts. [p. 202]"


Frances Ingraham Bosworth

In the 1870 census with her father in-law's family. Her husband.is listed too.


Matthew Chaloner Durfee Borden

The following Biography of Matthew Chaloner Borden was posted as a Public Member story on Ancestry.com by Susan Bradley.

Matthew was a merchant and manufacturer, and a native of Fall River, Mass., he was born July 18, 1842. His father, the late Colonel Richard Borden, was a conspicuous leader in all which contributed to the success and large prosperity of Fall River, from the date of the organization of its first and greatest manufacturing enterprises, beginning with the Fall River Iron Works Co. in 1821, down to the close of his eventful and memorable life, in 1874.

Matthew was fitted for a higher range of education at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass, and graduated from Yale College in the class of 1864. Almost immediately thereafter, he entered the employment of a leading dry goods jobbing house in New York, as stock boy in one of the departments. Three years later, he became a partner in a leading commission house of New York, where he represented The American Print Works as selling agent, continuing in this capacity until the end of 1879. The American Print Works having failed, his connection with the house referred to ceased. Mr. Borden inherited a large Share of the enterprise and capacity for management of his worthy father, and mainly through the joint efforts of his eldest brother and himself, the company was reorganized and resumed operations under the name of The American Printing Co., in January, 1880. At the same time, Mr. Borden made an alliance with the commission house of J. S. & E. Wright & Co., now Bliss, Fabyan & Co., with whom he has remained in the conduct of the business controlled by him ever since. In 1887, Mr. Borden bought his brother's interest in The American Printing Co., and from that time has been the capable sole owner of the works, which, in the number of yards printed annually, is probably the largest establishment of the kind in the world. The capacity of the Printing Company required from 60,000 to 70,000 pieces of cloth weekly, and it finally appeared desirable to become independent of the open market, as to a portion of the weekly consumption. In 1889, therefore, Mr. Borden proceeded to build cloth mills in Fall River for this purpose, and, at the end of three years, had erected and equipped in the most perfect manner possible three large mills for spinning yarns and weaving the same into cloth for printing. The plant so established, under the title of The Fall River Iron Works Co., a previous corporate name having been retained for the sake of keeping the old charter, which is valuable, now consists of the mills named, containing about 200,000 spindles and more than 5,000 looms, producing 35,000 pieces of print cloth weekly, or about one-half the whole amount required by The American Printing Co. The two companies are of enormous value to Fall River. They employ an army of well paid operatives, whose earnings, being diffused through the community, quicken every branch of local trade. Since establishing his home in New York, Mr. Borden has identified himself with the progress and social life of the city, and has gained the esteem, which is only accorded to sound character, public spirit, and good business qualifications.

He is a director in The Manhattan Company Bank; The Lincoln National Bank, The Astor Place Bank, The Lincoln Safe Deposit Co., and The New York Security & Trust Co; trustee and treasurer of The Clinton Hall Association; and governor in the Woman's Hospital in the State of New York. In politics, he has been an earnest and uncompromising Republican for more than thirty years. Mr. Borden has never sought office and never held office, except during one term as Commissioner of Parks, when he gave a large portion of his time for six years to this public duty. Experience in the employment of a large body of working people convinces him of the value to American labor of the protective system, and he advocates the policy which enables him to pay excellent wages to his people. His public spirit is also illustrated by his contributions to the support of the great museums of this city.

In 1865, Mr. Borden was married to Harriet M. Durfee of Fall River. Seven children have been born to them, of whom the following named four survive: Bertram Harold, Matthew Sterling, Howard Seymour and Owen Ives Borden. Mr. Borden is a member of the following clubs: Union League, Metropolitan, Republican, Merchants', Down Town, Players', Riding, New York Athletic, New York Yacht, Seawanhaka Yacht, Yale Alumni, South Side Sportmen's, Jekyl Island and Whist. He also belongs to The New England Society.


Edward Shirley Borden

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason on 14 Aug 2006 by Richard Denton Borden.

"Shirley attended Princeton University for three terms leaving in January 1886 and went out to Colorado to paint. (Shirley was an excellent painter but his father thought it bohemian and was vehemently opposed to it)."

"Their first child died very young. Shirley and Elizabeth (his first wife) vacationed annually in Colorado where, in 1903, bored with the sedentary life she was now living, she ran off with another man.

SOURCES: Title: Durfee Genealogy, Record Type: Handwritten partial genealogy, Subject: Durfee & Borden families Abbrev: Durfee Genealogy Author: prob E. Shirley Borden Publication: b ref 1932 Repository: Name: Chambless family, St. Louis, MO. As his father did, Shirley spent the winters in their Spruce Street home in Philadelphia and then packed up the wagons in the spring and journeyed out to Greendale in Media. After he married his second wife Elizabeth Evans they moved out there permanently. Shirley was elected to the Mayflower Society January 24, 1924 and had some deals with an Iron Works Company in Danville, Pa. so far no details have been found.

REFERENCE; James Pinckney Borden; Shirley, an extensive traveler among other things, was an avid Fox Hunter, excellent water color painter. He was a member and significant donor to the Presbyterian Church in Swarthmore, Pa. where he helped finance the current structure. He was Honorary President of The Rose Tree Fox Hunting Club, a member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, the St. Andrews Society and the Union League of Philadelphia. He was director of the First National Bank of Media from November 5, 1920 until August 23, 1927 when he became Vice President and Director and served in this capacity until his death ion 1951, with the exception of a five year term as President from January 10, 1940 until January 10 1945. He was also a Director of the Elwyn Training School.
While serving as President of the First National Bank of Media, Shirley accomplished a great deal for the community at large. Through loans from the bank he helped many local merchants in the start up of their businesses. He also brought electricity out to the rural areas from Media. Following the death of his second wife Elizabeth Evans Borden he took his children, Virginia, Ruth and Richard around the world by steamer in 1933. Around 1950 he bought and moved into the Old Rose Tree Inn where he died in 1951. He was buried in the family plot in Fall River."


Edward Shirley Borden

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason on 14 Aug 2006 by Richard Denton Borden.

"Shirley attended Princeton University for three terms leaving in January 1886 and went out to Colorado to paint. (Shirley was an excellent painter but his father thought it bohemian and was vehemently opposed to it)."

"Their first child died very young. Shirley and Elizabeth (his first wife) vacationed annually in Colorado where, in 1903, bored with the sedentary life she was now living, she ran off with another man.

SOURCES: Title: Durfee Genealogy, Record Type: Handwritten partial genealogy, Subject: Durfee & Borden families Abbrev: Durfee Genealogy Author: prob E. Shirley Borden Publication: b ref 1932 Repository: Name: Chambless family, St. Louis, MO. As his father did, Shirley spent the winters in their Spruce Street home in Philadelphia and then packed up the wagons in the spring and journeyed out to Greendale in Media. After he married his second wife Elizabeth Evans they moved out there permanently. Shirley was elected to the Mayflower Society January 24, 1924 and had some deals with an Iron Works Company in Danville, Pa. so far no details have been found.

REFERENCE; James Pinckney Borden; Shirley, an extensive traveler among other things, was an avid Fox Hunter, excellent water color painter. He was a member and significant donor to the Presbyterian Church in Swarthmore, Pa. where he helped finance the current structure. He was Honorary President of The Rose Tree Fox Hunting Club, a member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, the St. Andrews Society and the Union League of Philadelphia. He was director of the First National Bank of Media from November 5, 1920 until August 23, 1927 when he became Vice President and Director and served in this capacity until his death ion 1951, with the exception of a five year term as President from January 10, 1940 until January 10 1945. He was also a Director of the Elwyn Training School.
While serving as President of the First National Bank of Media, Shirley accomplished a great deal for the community at large. Through loans from the bank he helped many local merchants in the start up of their businesses. He also brought electricity out to the rural areas from Media. Following the death of his second wife Elizabeth Evans Borden he took his children, Virginia, Ruth and Richard around the world by steamer in 1933. Around 1950 he bought and moved into the Old Rose Tree Inn where he died in 1951. He was buried in the family plot in Fall River."


Edward Shirley Borden

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason on 14 Aug 2006 by Richard Denton Borden.

"Shirley attended Princeton University for three terms leaving in January 1886 and went out to Colorado to paint. (Shirley was an excellent painter but his father thought it bohemian and was vehemently opposed to it)."

"Their first child died very young. Shirley and Elizabeth (his first wife) vacationed annually in Colorado where, in 1903, bored with the sedentary life she was now living, she ran off with another man.

SOURCES: Title: Durfee Genealogy, Record Type: Handwritten partial genealogy, Subject: Durfee & Borden families Abbrev: Durfee Genealogy Author: prob E. Shirley Borden Publication: b ref 1932 Repository: Name: Chambless family, St. Louis, MO. As his father did, Shirley spent the winters in their Spruce Street home in Philadelphia and then packed up the wagons in the spring and journeyed out to Greendale in Media. After he married his second wife Elizabeth Evans they moved out there permanently. Shirley was elected to the Mayflower Society January 24, 1924 and had some deals with an Iron Works Company in Danville, Pa. so far no details have been found.

REFERENCE; James Pinckney Borden; Shirley, an extensive traveler among other things, was an avid Fox Hunter, excellent water color painter. He was a member and significant donor to the Presbyterian Church in Swarthmore, Pa. where he helped finance the current structure. He was Honorary President of The Rose Tree Fox Hunting Club, a member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, the St. Andrews Society and the Union League of Philadelphia. He was director of the First National Bank of Media from November 5, 1920 until August 23, 1927 when he became Vice President and Director and served in this capacity until his death ion 1951, with the exception of a five year term as President from January 10, 1940 until January 10 1945. He was also a Director of the Elwyn Training School.
While serving as President of the First National Bank of Media, Shirley accomplished a great deal for the community at large. Through loans from the bank he helped many local merchants in the start up of their businesses. He also brought electricity out to the rural areas from Media. Following the death of his second wife Elizabeth Evans Borden he took his children, Virginia, Ruth and Richard around the world by steamer in 1933. Around 1950 he bought and moved into the Old Rose Tree Inn where he died in 1951. He was buried in the family plot in Fall River."


Ida Mae Harris

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason on 14 Aug 2006 by Richard Denton Borden.

"of St Louis, Mo. She and Shirley had no children. Ida May Harris had two children from a previous marriage"