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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Elbert Earl Walden

RESEARCHER: Four generations of ancestor's information received from wife (Anabeth Dollins [axd2@psu.edu]) of grandson, Chuck. See [HYPERLINK http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/a/x/axd2/genealogy/genwalden.html ] Ancestors of Elbert Earl Walden


Jasper Newton Estep

In her biography Louisa Freestone said "When I was fourteen years of age I was married to J. N. Estep. You would be shocked now at the idea of a girl getting married so young. But in those days there were not so many people in this country, and that often happened. My Grandfather had passed on to the great beyond. Both he and Grandmother were broken in fortune by being paid in confederate money for all the property they owned just at close of civil war. There seemed to be scant prospect for me an orphan with only my dear old Grandmother to fend for the two of us. I was fully aware of the fact that I was very young to get married, yet understanding my condition in life, felt, after consulting with my Grandmother that to get married was the best thing for me.

We were married August 14th, 1874. We were very happy, our baby boy J. N. Junior was born Oct. 21st, 1875. But alas, as it ever has, and ever will be, men fall out, quarrel and get killed. So as a result of a quarrel with the man across the street, my dear husband was waylaid and shot, on the way to his place of business.He lived and suffered untold agonies for six weeks, when blood poisen set up and ended his life. Had there been good surgeons and hospitals at that time I feel sure he would have lived. Only ordinary doctors of San Saba at that time, did not or could not locate the bullet, and it was left to canker and poison the wound unto death. He died February 19th, 1877. Thus I was left at the age of sixteen years and eight months, a widow with a baby boy, one year and 4 months old. The people who should have befriended and helped me only persecuted, and worried me all the time. Finding it necessary to employ an attorney, providence as it seems to me led me to consult and employ W. M. Allison who proved a good friend and later, he asked my hand in marriage."


Louisa Mae Freestone

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason from Juli Dalton on 23Feb2002 and 12 Dec 2006.

Grandmother Allison's Memoirs. Just some things I remember and others I have been told. My maiden name was Louisa (shortened to Lila) Freestone. I was reared by my Grandparents Nathaniel Burden and Sallie his wife. My Grandparents came to Texas from Sparta, Tennessee sometime in the fifties. Perhaps 1854. They were originally from Virginia. Grandma's maiden name was McKenna. Her people settled at McKenna Texas. The place was named for them. She had a brother ______ (Marked this out, and I can't read it. Looks like it started with a J.) Mckenna who lived and reared his family there and still have relatives there. My Grandparents and my Father and Uncles William, Dave, and Carrol Burden were in San Saba and purchased lots from first sale, when the town and county first organized. My Father was first sherif of San Saba Co. Later he moved to a new settlement which is now the town of Navesota. Nathaniel Burden and family moved to Lampasas. My Grandparents previous to that time owned what in later years was known as the old Ward place South of the public square. They kept the first hotel in San Saba, there for a number of years. And I was born in that house in 1860. My parents had two children when they moved to Navasota. A boy named Columbus and myself. Father then joined the Army. In 62 my Mother expecting confinement Father came home on furlough and when the baby was two weeks old Mother died and as his time was up he had to leave baby sister and me with some kind neighbors, after writing my Grandparents to come for us. The baby contracted measles from the good people who kept us and when a few weeks old she died. My brother having died previously, I was the only child left. Grandma and one of my Aunts, with wagon and guards came after baby sister and me. Grandma, took measles too and was very ill for a time and Aunt's baby died of it too. I was at that time two years old. When I was four years old Father again came home on a furlough and sick with pneumonia. That was at Grandfather's (Burden) in Lampasas. The last time I remember him. He called a negro girl to his bedside and bade her sit me on the bed beside him and after placing his hand on my head and as I always have believed asked God to bless and take care of me, his little girl, and kissed me and said now take her away. I never saw him again for he died that night. Uncle William Burden was killed in the war and Uncle Carrol was severely wounded but lived some 20 years after that.

I believe there has always been a guiding hand or it has always appeared that way with me. There has been so many times that I have been constrained to take the right course in trials or temptations, when it was as if an unseen hand or unheard voice directed my course. My recollections go back to the years of 65 and on in the times of indian raids in San Saba. The indians always made their appearance on moonlight nights. Then the young men of the town whose only employment was driving cattle, and took pride in having good cow ponies and well equipped saddles would form a company of perhaps 6 or 8 men and have their horses all in a bunch and chained or tied. These men would take turns sitting up and guarding the horses. At one time while doing this on the block now owned by J. D. Estep, and on which is his residence, and just one block from my Grandparents residence that was on the jail lot, before the jail was built. We heard shouting and shooting in the night and discovered that the indians had slipped up and tried to get the horses, and the men fired on them. One Indian was shot and they then retreated taking the dead or wounded Indian in an improvised hammock made of a blanket and slung between two of their ponies. We could see them as they rode off in the bright moonlight. Two of my uncles were in the party guarding the horses. Those were very unsafe and uneasy times in and around San Saba. But somehow people were so accustomed to hearing and seeing so much of the indian depredations that they did not seem to be afraid. I remember my Grandmother often would take her one horse buggy and with only myself then about eight years of age go to Cherokee to visit one of her daughters, aunt Jane Williams who lived there at that time. When even men would not travel that road alone or unarmed. At one time Grandfather decided that he would preempt what is known as the Cottonwood Springs ranch, and our family and the family of my uncle in law John Yarbrough moved out there, put up tents and started hewing logs for a house. But a bunch of indians came in to the yard of Judge Wadsworths house on their ranch, a few miles distant, in daytime and after riding around and terrifying the family opened the corral gate and drove away their horses. So in a panic our folk all moved back to town. There were bad men too that people thought were responsible for a lot of so called Indian depredations. I remember once of seeing a wild Buffalo chased across the public square in San Saba. He was an immense animal and to my childish eyes looked a monster.

I can remember seeing Grandmother spin thread, weave cloth, and make garments of it. She also wove blankets and carpets. There were no coal oil lamps or matches. No cook stoves or sewing machines. The best lights we had were candles molded at home of beef tallow and bees wax. Then we had torches made of a plaited rag wick and placed in an iron vesel filled with some kind of grease. The cooking was done on the open fire place. A crane or hook hung over the fire to suspend the pot while it boiled. There were always good things to eat. The sweetest sweet potatoes put up in little houses or holds as they were called, made of logs or lumber from the old saw mill, and filled with straw, soil and potatoes. Then there were the great crocks of sausage, pickled pigs feet, mince meat, and delicious hams and bacon. Then the good old home made hominy, cheese and etc. There were an abundance of wild fruit such as plums, grapes, red and black berries, pecans and persimons. So jelly and preserves were no rarity. Pecans were allowed to fall and remain on the ground except what amount each family picked up for home use. Then as there was free range, each man had his bunch of swine and his individual mark which was cutting the ears of the pigs while small in different shapes such as this . These were turned out on the river bottom to fatten on the pecans, acorns, and the other nuts. Then when killing time came each family would send out and round up his own porkers and proceed to kill and cure meat in regular way. Cattle had free range also. Only it was considered at that time that any man finding an unbranded yearling had the right to place his own brand on it, no matter whose mark or brand was on the mother cow found with it. Some men took advantage of the so called maverick law, and made quite a lot of money that way. Then in later years, when the people had grown tired of this outlaw way of doing things, and began to build wire fences, and made a law against mavericking, there was fence cutting and blood shed over it for a number of years.

The first regular school in San Saba was taught by Joe Frazier Brown, in a rock building of two large long rooms. The building being made for the Masonic Lodge in the room above and for a kind of hall for all public purposes in the room below. So when it was decided that Mr. Brown would teach, the room was used for that purpose. The walls were rough and unplastered inside and the floor was of large flat stones. Sandstones hauled from near the Colorado River. There was a fireplace in one end of the building but it was not sufficient to heat the large room. So the men hauled saw dust from the old saw-mill on the creek, owned by J.S. Williams and company, and spread it on the floor in order to make it warmer for the children's feet. The seats were long Elm slabs placed on flat stones piled up to the propper height for comfortable sitting. These stones were placed at propper intervals to support the slabs. The only seats having support for the back, was the ones placed against the wall. At one time my seat being against the wall and as I returned to it from a recitation I discovered a large snake coiled next to a tier of stones just under where I sat. But when Mr. Brown investigated it proved to be a large chicken snake, and was soon disposed of and the excitement quelled. At another time as the senior class in math was reciting, the long recitation bench being against the opposite wall from where a number of us were sitting, I saw a large centipede crawl over from the wall on Miss Martha Low's shoulder. Fortunately at that time we wore the conventional long sleeved and high neck dresses, and Miss Martha wore knitted mittens. So feeling the centipede touch her shoulder she instantly knocked it to the floor, where Mr. Brown and some of the boys soon had it reduced to a pulp. What with the fear of Indians, the snakes, centipedes, and other things of threatening nature, we had a lively time. But oh those good old school days! How happy and care free. We had such fine times playing town (not sure) ball, king king calico, Puss on the corner, the old witch and ever so many other games too numerous to mention. We carried our lunch and even cooked some of it on a fire built in a stone chimney or fireplace we girls built and made a brush arbor of green cedar boughs. There are at present living in San Saba of us girls Mrs. T. B. Hart, S. W. Walker, May Holman, Annie Pool, G. H. Hagan, and myself.

The first public school was taught by Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Snelling. They had the contract for five years. Yes those were happy Days. I loved to go to school and considered it a disgrace for a pupil not to know each lesson assigned for the day. We could gather several kinds of wild fruit near the school building. Such as grapes plums and persimmons. We gathered the gum oozing from the cedar trees and with a white filmy part obtained from what we called the stretch berry bush would combine and chew it into what was considered a real good gum, and one could take the gum and stretch and flatten it out and place against the lips and suck in the breath and the report from the hole sucked in it was very loud, and many was the times a boy or girl lost their gum and stood in the corner when the sound was heard by the teacher. We had spelling bees every last Friday in the month. The whole school would participate, and two leaders, one on either side would choose the spellers or pupils until all were formed in two long lines. Then the words were given out from the old Webster blue back speller. Johnie B. Fleming and I were considered the best spellers in school, and during the week if one was head, there was small chance for the other one of us to get the head mark for that week. When it was time to take up school Mr. Brown our first teacher would get in the open door and call in a loud voice books, and we would all enter pell mell as it were. But later when Mr. Snelling took charge, he acquired a hand bell. The names of the pupils whom I remember attending the school taught by Mr. Snelling and the last I ever attended were as follows: Tom Ward----Will---May---and Ada...Mr. and Mrs. Tom Ward's (Senior) children Mildred Williams---Jul(?)---Wallace---Nora---and Mary. Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Williams, Connie Murray and Fayett. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Murray, Ida and Frank Murray. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Murray, Hillary, Jim, Elie (?), Eunice Mr. and Mrs. Dorens (?), Albert, Mary, and Sarah Mr. and Mrs. Jim Brown-----Mrs. J. C. Rugan's brother, Joe Ab (?), Mack, Susie, and Becky....Mr. and Mrs. John Brown's or Shorty as he was commonly called. Maggie Mars, boarding pupil. or non resident Miss Bell Hester. non-resident Martha, Eliza, Frazier, Dave, and Mary......Mr. and Mrs. D.D. Low's family or children Bettie, Dolly, and Mary... . Mr. and Mrs. Wadsworth, Lula, Sallie, Fannie, and George Mr. and Mrs. Cooke (G. B. Cook), Johnnie B. Fleming, Melissa, and Alfie Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Fleming, Jennie Daniels daughter of Mrs. Dofflenyse by a former marriage, Mamie and Mattie. Mr. and Mrs. Dofflenyse, Frank... Son of Dr. and Mrs. J.C. Rogen, Popie...Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Baker, Mary, Ocie, and Ada....Mr. and Mrs. John Baker Ell, John, Abel, Melinda, and Ann.....Robbins, Ann or as she was called Pigeon, Mary, and Jodie. Mr. and Mrs. Hardey,

My first experience in fishing trip, with my Uncle Nat Burden. He caught an eel and after removing it from the hook, called me and holding out the eel said now you must hold him for me. So I reluctantly took hold of it, and to my surprise and great discomfort found I could not do it. Of course my uncle just wanted to have some fun at my expense, and I soon realized the fact.

Once my aunt Sarah took me with her fishing and found after getting to the river, that I talked too much, and wishing to get rid of me she climbed into a big wash out in the bank of river and told me to go to the house, which wasn't very far and tell some one to come and get her out. But to my surprise and chagrin, after almost exhausting myself running, they only laughed and said, you little goose, she only wanted you out of the way while she fished. Oh what a pity and how sad, that thus early in life; little children have to lose their innocent and childlike faith in what they see and hear from parents, relatives and friends. When I was eight years of age I visited in the country for a week, with an aunt and family. While there I wandered out to the field, alone and sat down in the fence corner, when I discovered a nice round bed of grass and weeds in which there were five pretty spotted, tiny kittens as I thought they were. I took them in my lap and played for quite a while with them. At last growing tired of them, I replaced them in their bed and made my way back to the house. I then told my aunt about the pretty kittens and how I had played with them. She said why those were not kittens, but skunks, and it was a fortunate thing for me that the mother skunk did not return while I was there, or she would have bitten me severely.

The Beaver's Dam. Another time I was visiting at Aunt Jane Williams home on Cherokee Creek, and she sent Georgia my cousin and me up the creek to get some sand to scour with. There were at that time no Old Dutch, or other cleansers, so many people used the nice white sand to scour the cedar water buckets, churns, and floors. Well we went far up the creek and my cousin exclaimed "Oh here is a beaver dam, lets pull it down and see the water go rushing down the creek." So we set dilligently to work and heedless of how time passed, pulled one stick after another, and the rotten logs, out of the dam, until the water had a clear sweep down the creek, while we looked on and enjoyed it, wondering how long it would take the beaver workers to build it up again. When we finally decided to return home with the sand it must have been at least one o'clock in the evening, as lunch was over and dishes cleared away. My aunt came out to meet us with grim countenance and a long switch. She took hold of Georgia and gave her a switching and to my surprise, she then switched me also, and my feelings and pride were more hurt than was my skirt which she switched lightly. Thus I found out what it meant to be an accomplice in mischief or otherwise.

That was my first visit for any length of time away from home. When on the first evening the sun was low, the chickens chirping to be put in coops and fed, the frogs croaked, and katydids added their lonesome chants, Oh how lonesome and forlorn was one little girl far from grandmother and home. While there I had many pleasant walks in the cool shaded paths along the banks of Cherokee Creek.

(Punishment undeserved.) I loved my Grandmother and always tried to do as I believed she would want me to do. But one time my heart was made very sore and sad when through a misunderstanding, and circumstantial evidence I was punished knowing myself innocent of evil intention. My cousin Maggie Derrit, daughter of Aunt Sarah and her former husband then dead, were sent to the old mill pond for water, and as children will do to this good Day we stopped to play, throwing large green chips over a pile of refuse fragments of lumber sawed at the mill. We called the game ante over, and would stand on oposite sides and toss them to each other. One of the chips sailed from my hand and going over, struck my little cousin cutting a gash in her forehead, which immediately bled profusely. Frightened at the lick and sight of the blood she ran ahead of me screaming and my Grandmother asked what had happened. She said oh Lila hit me with a big chip. Well when I arrived, there stood Grandmother with a switch ready and willing to use it as she did without questions or explanations. I would not for anything knowingly have hurt Maggie, and felt they ought to have known it. So that goes to show that we should always be sure we are right before condeming others. The result of disobedience.

One day I said "Grandmother, may Maggie and I go visit a little girl who lived near the head of the mill pond." She gave us permission after we promised not to go down to the pond. When we got there, the people were all away from home except the little friend we were visiting. So after playing around for some time she said I must go to the pond for some water. I said we could not go with her because Grandmother had told us not to do so. But she said oh you can stand on the bank and wait while I get the pail of water. After some persuasion on her part I gave in and went with her, but alas one step leads to another, and when she walked out far over the water on an old log, and started gathering the nice long willow swiches, I forgot everything, even my promise not to go near the water and hurried out behind her on the log. When lo off comes a rotten portion of it and over I went on the far side from the bank and in water about 8 feet deep. I could not swim, and immediately went to the bottom. Coming up I grabbed wildly for a willow switch that grew on a tree far out. But it split and down I went again, up once more and this time fortunately the switch I caught did not break. But how was I to reach the bank? The two girls were so frightened they did not know what to do. So I called to them to run and get help. Off they went but only found one other girl in the neighborhood at home. So she came and could only wring her her hands and look at me. Fearing each moment my hold would break from the tree I had to think quick. So I said run and get a fishing pole and hold it out for me to take hold, and so in that way they drew me up to safety a sad, but much wiser little girl. I fully believed it was a punishment for my disobedience, and was very careful in future to do as I was bid by those who had the care over me.

My first trip to Austin where I (first) saw the train. My Grandmother took me with her to visit one of her daughters, (Mrs. John Duncan [I'm not sure about the last name.] ) I was ten years old. We spent a month there and meantime I attended sundy school in Austin. One day the sundy school had a picnic in the country several miles from the city. So were to ride on the train out there and back. When I with other children arrived at the station, I was over awed at seeing the big engine, puffing and blowing off steam. So when the children started getting on, my heart failed me, and I said no I could not get on that thing, and turned and went back to my aunts, telling Grandmother I did not want to go on that awful thing, and would just as soon eat my lunch at home with her. Austin was just a little village then, no paved or regular made streets. Just rocks, gullies and up hill down hill. Davis was Governor.

When I was fourteen years of age I was married to J. N. Estep. You would be shocked now at the idea of a girl getting married so young. But in those days there were not so many people in this country, and that often happened. My Grandfather had passed on to the great beyond. Both he and Grandmother were broken in fortune by being paid in confederate money for all the property they owned just at close of civil war. There seemed to be scant prospect for me an orphan with only my dear old Grandmother to fend for the two of us. I was fully aware of the fact that I was very young to get married, yet understanding my condition in life, felt, after consulting with my Grandmother that to get married was the best thing for me.

We were married August 14th, 1874. We were very happy, our baby boy J. N. Junior was born Oct. 21st, 1875. But alas, as it ever has, and ever will be, men fall out, quarrel and get killed. So as a result of a quarrel with the man across the street, my dear husband was waylaid and shot, on the way to his place of business. He lived and suffered untold agonies for six weeks, when blood poisen set up and ended his life. Had there been good surgeons and hospitals at that time I feel sure he would have lived. Only ordinary doctors of San Saba at that time, did not or could not locate the bullet, and it was left to canker and poison the wound unto death. He died February 19th, 1877. Thus I was left at the age of sixteen years and eight months, a widow with a baby boy, one year and 4 months old. The people who should have befriended and helped me only persecuted, and worried me all the time. Finding it necessary to employ an attorney, providence as it seems to me led me to consult and employ W. M. Allison who proved a good friend and later, he asked my hand in marriage. We were married July 24th, 1878. Lived almost fifty years together. A long and happy life. To us were born ten children. M. F. or Matthew Freestone, Frank Ramsy, Fannie Lee, Benjamin Rush, Sallie Louise, Mary Jane, William Mack, James Eblen, Ross Donnan, and Astyne Allan.

My son J. N. Estep we called Newt, was just the same with Mr. Allison as the other children and I believe he (Newt) loved him as his own father. Always called him papa as did the others. Once when he was four years old he was displeased about something and kept crying. So Mr. Allison said he would just put a dress on him as he cried like a girl. So he went to the closet and found a red dress of which Newt had been especialy proud, and put it on him. Newt hushed crying and stood very quietly while being dressed, then he came to me and said look mama! Papa put on my pretty red dress. Matt was just 20 months older than Frank, and as they grew to be about 8 and 9 respectively they looked like twins in size, and were always near each other. Matt was so anxious to learn to read that he carried his first reader around with him and was always trying to get someone to tell him what it was all about. So I procured the books necessary and his cousin Anna Eblen and I taught him at home up to the third grade, and Frank also studied and when it came time for Matt to start to school at 8 years of age Frank insisted that he too must go. We talked it over and decided to start them both at the same time although we had to pay tuition for Frank. Matt entered in the third grade and Frank in the second. Newt started when he was eight. He was a good student and I have always regreted that I gave my consent for him to remain out of school one year to help feed pears to a bunch of steers. There was a hard dry fall and feed scarce and high. Mr. Allison hired one man, but needed another one and did not feel able to pay two mens wages. So Newt had to quit school and help the hired man feed. I thought he would go to school the next year but he would not go back, because his class had gone ahead of him. So went to work for a time with Mr. Henry Ketchum who was post-master and also had a little notions store on the side. Newt later decided he must get married to Miss Nannie Godfrey. And when he was twenty and she seventeen, they were married. His step father (Mr. Allison) bought an interest in small grocery store Nannie's father is in, and soon found the goods were mortgaged for all they were worth, and lost all we put in it. Then his Papa gave him one hundred acres of good land five miles out from the river on North side, and privilege to pasture all stock he could get free of charge. When he had a nice little bunch of cattle and good prospects, and as his wife did not like to live in the country, he sold out, and also sold a town lot on North East side on corner of San Saba for two hundred and fifty dollars, and went to Arizona expecting to make a lot of money. But finally came back broke and went into the blacksmith business. His papa gave him land up on the hill South of the town of San Saba to build a dwelling house on. He lived there a number of years and reared most of his family there. There were five children born to them. Allison Newton, Bonita, Tim [or Jim], Frank, and Katie Lou. Later both Allison and Katie Lou died. They then sold out in San Saba and moved to Harlingen, Tx. where they are at this time, Sept-1931. Newt was always a good steady and reliable boy. Gave us no trouble at all. Always consulting me on any thing he wished to do. His papa as he always called Mr. Allison often remarked on how good he had always been to and with us. I think both loved each other as father and son, even as much as if it had been a true relation between them.

When Newt learned to milk the cow. We purchased an old gentle cow from, a man named Hackworth. So we named her Hackworth. As my husband had not learned, and did not wish to, the art of milking I had hither to performed that task, and Newt decided he would like to learn to milk too. So I allowed him to practice on this cow until he could do quite well. Then gradually he took the work over and I left it to him. One day he started to the lot with milk pail in hand, feeling somewhat reluctant about going. When he remarked I wish I had never seen old Hackworth. After that as the other boys grew up, each served their turns milking and attending to all out door work.

Our home where all eleven children were born and reared up to the year 1906, was in the South East part of San Saba Town, and occupied a whole block, with ample and pleasant play ground for the boys and girls in all seasons, and it was a happy and care free time with them. Mat and Frank hitches up the calf to take their little sister for a ride in their little wagon. They worked for quite a while with small ropes and strings, finally being satisfied with the harness and feeling sure the time was ripe to turn loose the calf, as Frank was just in the act of lifting little sister into the wagon, Matt turned loose the team. As they were in the back yard, and the calf was headed toward the side gate which stood open, He gave one jump and with head down and tail up, bellowing and pitching, off he went, with the boys bringing up the rear with yells, causing such din and clatter as to almost deafen you. When finally the poor frightened calf was run down, not a whole piece of that wagon could be found. Luckily they failed to get their little passenger on board.

Matt makes a rhyme. His Father was talking about getting a carpenter to do some work on our house, and Matt 7 years old exclaimed. Hire Mr. Blakeney. He will work and work until the whistle blows and drop his hammer and away he goes. Then one from Eblen who was his cousin Anna's pet, and who always hung around her when she was at home. One Day we were sitting on the back porch. She and Fannie sitting on the door step. Eblen as usual crowding and climbing over her. When she said Oh Eblen I think I will have to wean you. And he as I suspect had heard mothers discuss the best time of the year to wean their babies, exclaimed. Oh no cousin Anna, Not this time of the year.

Rush when Newt got married. Sitting in his little rocking chair seemingly in deep thought, gave a sigh and said. I am not going to get married ever, but am going to stay with you and papa as long as you will let me. And he kept his word by staying with us as long as we kept house. Then he married Miss Gladys Karnes, a sweet and good girl, and they now have two sweet and good looking boys. But, Alas February 3rd 1939 Rush lost his wife Gladys and the oldest of three little boys. B. R. the one that died was three years, three months and three Days old. The Mother and two oldest boys had scarlet fever. Gladys gave birth to a baby boy and died in six days after he was born. Both she and B. R. died within three days of each other. Frank Edward the second boy recovered, and he and his brother Howard Cleveland are both living with their Father and me. Alstyne my youngest child died the same year in June. Fannie my oldest Girl died also same year in October. I am 78 years old. Have had the dear children 6 years. God has given me strength and life, so far to take care of them. We have lived in San Saba, Waco, Austin and now in Sinton. When I was 72 years old I went on a trip to California, to get away from scenes and sorrow for a while. Mary and Billy went too. We had a very good time while there. A number of war ships were in port off the beach, and each day we went out and were permited to go on board of one. Had exciting times getting out to them and sometimes were well sprayed with water as the boats sped through the water. Also visited Catalina Island, on a large steam boat. Also was in the one with glass bottom. While there I visited one of my old friend's boys, Ed Peisken (?) and family. Had a very pleasant weeks visit with them. And such a nice family too. On Sunday which was my 72nd birthday, Ed took us all driving all over the county it seemed to me. Then we went to the Air Port in Los Angelos and (Ed's wife) Jessie and I were watching people take rides in the huge plane. So I said, lets go up too. She laughed at me. But said if I went she would go with me. So I said I am going. There are no children here to say no Mama. And I can do what I like. Come on. So she said well I promised and guess I will have to go. So we flew all over Holiwood and the canyons and Los Angelos. So I have ridden in ox carts and all other vehicles up to air planes.

Transcribed by Sally Jane Anderson Riggs, daughter of Mary Louise Collins Anderson, and granddaughter of Sallie Louise Allison Collins. I have tried to copy this just as she wrote it. Sometimes she spelled the same word two different ways. In places where I was really unsure of her writing, I put question marks. I believe that several of those were names. If anyone can give me a correction, I would be very glad to have it. I hope that everyone enjoys reading this as much as I have enjoyed typing it. I only wish there were more.


Judge William Mack Allison

RESEARCHER: Information sent from Frances Adams to T.Mason on 28 Jan 2006. "From the book: The Texas Rangers & The San Saba Mob, Page 81. ALLISON, WILLIAM MACK (17 Jan 1845 - 14 Sept 1926) Born in Chattanooga Tennessee. Served the confederacy and enlisted 1 September 1862 in Co. "A", 16th Battalion, Neal's' Tennessee Cavalry. He was wounded once and suffered a broken leg, which rendered it about two inches shorter for the remainder of his life. Came to Texas in 1876 and in 1878 married LOUISA "LILA" ESTEP (see Confederate Widows Pension #49057) of San Saba on 24 Aug 1878. Together they raised ten children. Served as the district judge (elected twice 1892 - 1901) for the 33rd Judicial District. In 1896, he requested the Rangers to come to San Saba at the instance of the anti-Mob element. In 1897, he was pressured by the Mob to have the Rangers removed. He remained at odds with them (Rangers) until they left in 1898. He was a member of San Saba Masonic Lodge No. 612 and a Past Master in 1888, 1889 & 1890. A Methodist by faith and buried in the san Saba City Cemetery with Masonic rites. See obituary, San Saba News & Star, 16 September 1926, 23 September 1926."


Louisa Mae Freestone

RESEARCHER: Information sent to T.Mason from Juli Dalton on 23Feb2002 and 12 Dec 2006.

Grandmother Allison's Memoirs. Just some things I remember and others I have been told. My maiden name was Louisa (shortened to Lila) Freestone. I was reared by my Grandparents Nathaniel Burden and Sallie his wife. My Grandparents came to Texas from Sparta, Tennessee sometime in the fifties. Perhaps 1854. They were originally from Virginia. Grandma's maiden name was McKenna. Her people settled at McKenna Texas. The place was named for them. She had a brother ______ (Marked this out, and I can't read it. Looks like it started with a J.) Mckenna who lived and reared his family there and still have relatives there. My Grandparents and my Father and Uncles William, Dave, and Carrol Burden were in San Saba and purchased lots from first sale, when the town and county first organized. My Father was first sherif of San Saba Co. Later he moved to a new settlement which is now the town of Navesota. Nathaniel Burden and family moved to Lampasas. My Grandparents previous to that time owned what in later years was known as the old Ward place South of the public square. They kept the first hotel in San Saba, there for a number of years. And I was born in that house in 1860. My parents had two children when they moved to Navasota. A boy named Columbus and myself. Father then joined the Army. In 62 my Mother expecting confinement Father came home on furlough and when the baby was two weeks old Mother died and as his time was up he had to leave baby sister and me with some kind neighbors, after writing my Grandparents to come for us. The baby contracted measles from the good people who kept us and when a few weeks old she died. My brother having died previously, I was the only child left. Grandma and one of my Aunts, with wagon and guards came after baby sister and me. Grandma, took measles too and was very ill for a time and Aunt's baby died of it too. I was at that time two years old. When I was four years old Father again came home on a furlough and sick with pneumonia. That was at Grandfather's (Burden) in Lampasas. The last time I remember him. He called a negro girl to his bedside and bade her sit me on the bed beside him and after placing his hand on my head and as I always have believed asked God to bless and take care of me, his little girl, and kissed me and said now take her away. I never saw him again for he died that night. Uncle William Burden was killed in the war and Uncle Carrol was severely wounded but lived some 20 years after that.

I believe there has always been a guiding hand or it has always appeared that way with me. There has been so many times that I have been constrained to take the right course in trials or temptations, when it was as if an unseen hand or unheard voice directed my course. My recollections go back to the years of 65 and on in the times of indian raids in San Saba. The indians always made their appearance on moonlight nights. Then the young men of the town whose only employment was driving cattle, and took pride in having good cow ponies and well equipped saddles would form a company of perhaps 6 or 8 men and have their horses all in a bunch and chained or tied. These men would take turns sitting up and guarding the horses. At one time while doing this on the block now owned by J. D. Estep, and on which is his residence, and just one block from my Grandparents residence that was on the jail lot, before the jail was built. We heard shouting and shooting in the night and discovered that the indians had slipped up and tried to get the horses, and the men fired on them. One Indian was shot and they then retreated taking the dead or wounded Indian in an improvised hammock made of a blanket and slung between two of their ponies. We could see them as they rode off in the bright moonlight. Two of my uncles were in the party guarding the horses. Those were very unsafe and uneasy times in and around San Saba. But somehow people were so accustomed to hearing and seeing so much of the indian depredations that they did not seem to be afraid. I remember my Grandmother often would take her one horse buggy and with only myself then about eight years of age go to Cherokee to visit one of her daughters, aunt Jane Williams who lived there at that time. When even men would not travel that road alone or unarmed. At one time Grandfather decided that he would preempt what is known as the Cottonwood Springs ranch, and our family and the family of my uncle in law John Yarbrough moved out there, put up tents and started hewing logs for a house. But a bunch of indians came in to the yard of Judge Wadsworths house on their ranch, a few miles distant, in daytime and after riding around and terrifying the family opened the corral gate and drove away their horses. So in a panic our folk all moved back to town. There were bad men too that people thought were responsible for a lot of so called Indian depredations. I remember once of seeing a wild Buffalo chased across the public square in San Saba. He was an immense animal and to my childish eyes looked a monster.

I can remember seeing Grandmother spin thread, weave cloth, and make garments of it. She also wove blankets and carpets. There were no coal oil lamps or matches. No cook stoves or sewing machines. The best lights we had were candles molded at home of beef tallow and bees wax. Then we had torches made of a plaited rag wick and placed in an iron vesel filled with some kind of grease. The cooking was done on the open fire place. A crane or hook hung over the fire to suspend the pot while it boiled. There were always good things to eat. The sweetest sweet potatoes put up in little houses or holds as they were called, made of logs or lumber from the old saw mill, and filled with straw, soil and potatoes. Then there were the great crocks of sausage, pickled pigs feet, mince meat, and delicious hams and bacon. Then the good old home made hominy, cheese and etc. There were an abundance of wild fruit such as plums, grapes, red and black berries, pecans and persimons. So jelly and preserves were no rarity. Pecans were allowed to fall and remain on the ground except what amount each family picked up for home use. Then as there was free range, each man had his bunch of swine and his individual mark which was cutting the ears of the pigs while small in different shapes such as this . These were turned out on the river bottom to fatten on the pecans, acorns, and the other nuts. Then when killing time came each family would send out and round up his own porkers and proceed to kill and cure meat in regular way. Cattle had free range also. Only it was considered at that time that any man finding an unbranded yearling had the right to place his own brand on it, no matter whose mark or brand was on the mother cow found with it. Some men took advantage of the so called maverick law, and made quite a lot of money that way. Then in later years, when the people had grown tired of this outlaw way of doing things, and began to build wire fences, and made a law against mavericking, there was fence cutting and blood shed over it for a number of years.

The first regular school in San Saba was taught by Joe Frazier Brown, in a rock building of two large long rooms. The building being made for the Masonic Lodge in the room above and for a kind of hall for all public purposes in the room below. So when it was decided that Mr. Brown would teach, the room was used for that purpose. The walls were rough and unplastered inside and the floor was of large flat stones. Sandstones hauled from near the Colorado River. There was a fireplace in one end of the building but it was not sufficient to heat the large room. So the men hauled saw dust from the old saw-mill on the creek, owned by J.S. Williams and company, and spread it on the floor in order to make it warmer for the children's feet. The seats were long Elm slabs placed on flat stones piled up to the propper height for comfortable sitting. These stones were placed at propper intervals to support the slabs. The only seats having support for the back, was the ones placed against the wall. At one time my seat being against the wall and as I returned to it from a recitation I discovered a large snake coiled next to a tier of stones just under where I sat. But when Mr. Brown investigated it proved to be a large chicken snake, and was soon disposed of and the excitement quelled. At another time as the senior class in math was reciting, the long recitation bench being against the opposite wall from where a number of us were sitting, I saw a large centipede crawl over from the wall on Miss Martha Low's shoulder. Fortunately at that time we wore the conventional long sleeved and high neck dresses, and Miss Martha wore knitted mittens. So feeling the centipede touch her shoulder she instantly knocked it to the floor, where Mr. Brown and some of the boys soon had it reduced to a pulp. What with the fear of Indians, the snakes, centipedes, and other things of threatening nature, we had a lively time. But oh those good old school days! How happy and care free. We had such fine times playing town (not sure) ball, king king calico, Puss on the corner, the old witch and ever so many other games too numerous to mention. We carried our lunch and even cooked some of it on a fire built in a stone chimney or fireplace we girls built and made a brush arbor of green cedar boughs. There are at present living in San Saba of us girls Mrs. T. B. Hart, S. W. Walker, May Holman, Annie Pool, G. H. Hagan, and myself.

The first public school was taught by Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Snelling. They had the contract for five years. Yes those were happy Days. I loved to go to school and considered it a disgrace for a pupil not to know each lesson assigned for the day. We could gather several kinds of wild fruit near the school building. Such as grapes plums and persimmons. We gathered the gum oozing from the cedar trees and with a white filmy part obtained from what we called the stretch berry bush would combine and chew it into what was considered a real good gum, and one could take the gum and stretch and flatten it out and place against the lips and suck in the breath and the report from the hole sucked in it was very loud, and many was the times a boy or girl lost their gum and stood in the corner when the sound was heard by the teacher. We had spelling bees every last Friday in the month. The whole school would participate, and two leaders, one on either side would choose the spellers or pupils until all were formed in two long lines. Then the words were given out from the old Webster blue back speller. Johnie B. Fleming and I were considered the best spellers in school, and during the week if one was head, there was small chance for the other one of us to get the head mark for that week. When it was time to take up school Mr. Brown our first teacher would get in the open door and call in a loud voice books, and we would all enter pell mell as it were. But later when Mr. Snelling took charge, he acquired a hand bell. The names of the pupils whom I remember attending the school taught by Mr. Snelling and the last I ever attended were as follows: Tom Ward----Will---May---and Ada...Mr. and Mrs. Tom Ward's (Senior) children Mildred Williams---Jul(?)---Wallace---Nora---and Mary. Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Williams, Connie Murray and Fayett. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Murray, Ida and Frank Murray. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Murray, Hillary, Jim, Elie (?), Eunice Mr. and Mrs. Dorens (?), Albert, Mary, and Sarah Mr. and Mrs. Jim Brown-----Mrs. J. C. Rugan's brother, Joe Ab (?), Mack, Susie, and Becky....Mr. and Mrs. John Brown's or Shorty as he was commonly called. Maggie Mars, boarding pupil. or non resident Miss Bell Hester. non-resident Martha, Eliza, Frazier, Dave, and Mary......Mr. and Mrs. D.D. Low's family or children Bettie, Dolly, and Mary... . Mr. and Mrs. Wadsworth, Lula, Sallie, Fannie, and George Mr. and Mrs. Cooke (G. B. Cook), Johnnie B. Fleming, Melissa, and Alfie Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Fleming, Jennie Daniels daughter of Mrs. Dofflenyse by a former marriage, Mamie and Mattie. Mr. and Mrs. Dofflenyse, Frank... Son of Dr. and Mrs. J.C. Rogen, Popie...Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Baker, Mary, Ocie, and Ada....Mr. and Mrs. John Baker Ell, John, Abel, Melinda, and Ann.....Robbins, Ann or as she was called Pigeon, Mary, and Jodie. Mr. and Mrs. Hardey,

My first experience in fishing trip, with my Uncle Nat Burden. He caught an eel and after removing it from the hook, called me and holding out the eel said now you must hold him for me. So I reluctantly took hold of it, and to my surprise and great discomfort found I could not do it. Of course my uncle just wanted to have some fun at my expense, and I soon realized the fact.

Once my aunt Sarah took me with her fishing and found after getting to the river, that I talked too much, and wishing to get rid of me she climbed into a big wash out in the bank of river and told me to go to the house, which wasn't very far and tell some one to come and get her out. But to my surprise and chagrin, after almost exhausting myself running, they only laughed and said, you little goose, she only wanted you out of the way while she fished. Oh what a pity and how sad, that thus early in life; little children have to lose their innocent and childlike faith in what they see and hear from parents, relatives and friends. When I was eight years of age I visited in the country for a week, with an aunt and family. While there I wandered out to the field, alone and sat down in the fence corner, when I discovered a nice round bed of grass and weeds in which there were five pretty spotted, tiny kittens as I thought they were. I took them in my lap and played for quite a while with them. At last growing tired of them, I replaced them in their bed and made my way back to the house. I then told my aunt about the pretty kittens and how I had played with them. She said why those were not kittens, but skunks, and it was a fortunate thing for me that the mother skunk did not return while I was there, or she would have bitten me severely.

The Beaver's Dam. Another time I was visiting at Aunt Jane Williams home on Cherokee Creek, and she sent Georgia my cousin and me up the creek to get some sand to scour with. There were at that time no Old Dutch, or other cleansers, so many people used the nice white sand to scour the cedar water buckets, churns, and floors. Well we went far up the creek and my cousin exclaimed "Oh here is a beaver dam, lets pull it down and see the water go rushing down the creek." So we set dilligently to work and heedless of how time passed, pulled one stick after another, and the rotten logs, out of the dam, until the water had a clear sweep down the creek, while we looked on and enjoyed it, wondering how long it would take the beaver workers to build it up again. When we finally decided to return home with the sand it must have been at least one o'clock in the evening, as lunch was over and dishes cleared away. My aunt came out to meet us with grim countenance and a long switch. She took hold of Georgia and gave her a switching and to my surprise, she then switched me also, and my feelings and pride were more hurt than was my skirt which she switched lightly. Thus I found out what it meant to be an accomplice in mischief or otherwise.

That was my first visit for any length of time away from home. When on the first evening the sun was low, the chickens chirping to be put in coops and fed, the frogs croaked, and katydids added their lonesome chants, Oh how lonesome and forlorn was one little girl far from grandmother and home. While there I had many pleasant walks in the cool shaded paths along the banks of Cherokee Creek.

(Punishment undeserved.) I loved my Grandmother and always tried to do as I believed she would want me to do. But one time my heart was made very sore and sad when through a misunderstanding, and circumstantial evidence I was punished knowing myself innocent of evil intention. My cousin Maggie Derrit, daughter of Aunt Sarah and her former husband then dead, were sent to the old mill pond for water, and as children will do to this good Day we stopped to play, throwing large green chips over a pile of refuse fragments of lumber sawed at the mill. We called the game ante over, and would stand on oposite sides and toss them to each other. One of the chips sailed from my hand and going over, struck my little cousin cutting a gash in her forehead, which immediately bled profusely. Frightened at the lick and sight of the blood she ran ahead of me screaming and my Grandmother asked what had happened. She said oh Lila hit me with a big chip. Well when I arrived, there stood Grandmother with a switch ready and willing to use it as she did without questions or explanations. I would not for anything knowingly have hurt Maggie, and felt they ought to have known it. So that goes to show that we should always be sure we are right before condeming others. The result of disobedience.

One day I said "Grandmother, may Maggie and I go visit a little girl who lived near the head of the mill pond." She gave us permission after we promised not to go down to the pond. When we got there, the people were all away from home except the little friend we were visiting. So after playing around for some time she said I must go to the pond for some water. I said we could not go with her because Grandmother had told us not to do so. But she said oh you can stand on the bank and wait while I get the pail of water. After some persuasion on her part I gave in and went with her, but alas one step leads to another, and when she walked out far over the water on an old log, and started gathering the nice long willow swiches, I forgot everything, even my promise not to go near the water and hurried out behind her on the log. When lo off comes a rotten portion of it and over I went on the far side from the bank and in water about 8 feet deep. I could not swim, and immediately went to the bottom. Coming up I grabbed wildly for a willow switch that grew on a tree far out. But it split and down I went again, up once more and this time fortunately the switch I caught did not break. But how was I to reach the bank? The two girls were so frightened they did not know what to do. So I called to them to run and get help. Off they went but only found one other girl in the neighborhood at home. So she came and could only wring her her hands and look at me. Fearing each moment my hold would break from the tree I had to think quick. So I said run and get a fishing pole and hold it out for me to take hold, and so in that way they drew me up to safety a sad, but much wiser little girl. I fully believed it was a punishment for my disobedience, and was very careful in future to do as I was bid by those who had the care over me.

My first trip to Austin where I (first) saw the train. My Grandmother took me with her to visit one of her daughters, (Mrs. John Duncan [I'm not sure about the last name.] ) I was ten years old. We spent a month there and meantime I attended sundy school in Austin. One day the sundy school had a picnic in the country several miles from the city. So were to ride on the train out there and back. When I with other children arrived at the station, I was over awed at seeing the big engine, puffing and blowing off steam. So when the children started getting on, my heart failed me, and I said no I could not get on that thing, and turned and went back to my aunts, telling Grandmother I did not want to go on that awful thing, and would just as soon eat my lunch at home with her. Austin was just a little village then, no paved or regular made streets. Just rocks, gullies and up hill down hill. Davis was Governor.

When I was fourteen years of age I was married to J. N. Estep. You would be shocked now at the idea of a girl getting married so young. But in those days there were not so many people in this country, and that often happened. My Grandfather had passed on to the great beyond. Both he and Grandmother were broken in fortune by being paid in confederate money for all the property they owned just at close of civil war. There seemed to be scant prospect for me an orphan with only my dear old Grandmother to fend for the two of us. I was fully aware of the fact that I was very young to get married, yet understanding my condition in life, felt, after consulting with my Grandmother that to get married was the best thing for me.

We were married August 14th, 1874. We were very happy, our baby boy J. N. Junior was born Oct. 21st, 1875. But alas, as it ever has, and ever will be, men fall out, quarrel and get killed. So as a result of a quarrel with the man across the street, my dear husband was waylaid and shot, on the way to his place of business. He lived and suffered untold agonies for six weeks, when blood poisen set up and ended his life. Had there been good surgeons and hospitals at that time I feel sure he would have lived. Only ordinary doctors of San Saba at that time, did not or could not locate the bullet, and it was left to canker and poison the wound unto death. He died February 19th, 1877. Thus I was left at the age of sixteen years and eight months, a widow with a baby boy, one year and 4 months old. The people who should have befriended and helped me only persecuted, and worried me all the time. Finding it necessary to employ an attorney, providence as it seems to me led me to consult and employ W. M. Allison who proved a good friend and later, he asked my hand in marriage. We were married July 24th, 1878. Lived almost fifty years together. A long and happy life. To us were born ten children. M. F. or Matthew Freestone, Frank Ramsy, Fannie Lee, Benjamin Rush, Sallie Louise, Mary Jane, William Mack, James Eblen, Ross Donnan, and Astyne Allan.

My son J. N. Estep we called Newt, was just the same with Mr. Allison as the other children and I believe he (Newt) loved him as his own father. Always called him papa as did the others. Once when he was four years old he was displeased about something and kept crying. So Mr. Allison said he would just put a dress on him as he cried like a girl. So he went to the closet and found a red dress of which Newt had been especialy proud, and put it on him. Newt hushed crying and stood very quietly while being dressed, then he came to me and said look mama! Papa put on my pretty red dress. Matt was just 20 months older than Frank, and as they grew to be about 8 and 9 respectively they looked like twins in size, and were always near each other. Matt was so anxious to learn to read that he carried his first reader around with him and was always trying to get someone to tell him what it was all about. So I procured the books necessary and his cousin Anna Eblen and I taught him at home up to the third grade, and Frank also studied and when it came time for Matt to start to school at 8 years of age Frank insisted that he too must go. We talked it over and decided to start them both at the same time although we had to pay tuition for Frank. Matt entered in the third grade and Frank in the second. Newt started when he was eight. He was a good student and I have always regreted that I gave my consent for him to remain out of school one year to help feed pears to a bunch of steers. There was a hard dry fall and feed scarce and high. Mr. Allison hired one man, but needed another one and did not feel able to pay two mens wages. So Newt had to quit school and help the hired man feed. I thought he would go to school the next year but he would not go back, because his class had gone ahead of him. So went to work for a time with Mr. Henry Ketchum who was post-master and also had a little notions store on the side. Newt later decided he must get married to Miss Nannie Godfrey. And when he was twenty and she seventeen, they were married. His step father (Mr. Allison) bought an interest in small grocery store Nannie's father is in, and soon found the goods were mortgaged for all they were worth, and lost all we put in it. Then his Papa gave him one hundred acres of good land five miles out from the river on North side, and privilege to pasture all stock he could get free of charge. When he had a nice little bunch of cattle and good prospects, and as his wife did not like to live in the country, he sold out, and also sold a town lot on North East side on corner of San Saba for two hundred and fifty dollars, and went to Arizona expecting to make a lot of money. But finally came back broke and went into the blacksmith business. His papa gave him land up on the hill South of the town of San Saba to build a dwelling house on. He lived there a number of years and reared most of his family there. There were five children born to them. Allison Newton, Bonita, Tim [or Jim], Frank, and Katie Lou. Later both Allison and Katie Lou died. They then sold out in San Saba and moved to Harlingen, Tx. where they are at this time, Sept-1931. Newt was always a good steady and reliable boy. Gave us no trouble at all. Always consulting me on any thing he wished to do. His papa as he always called Mr. Allison often remarked on how good he had always been to and with us. I think both loved each other as father and son, even as much as if it had been a true relation between them.

When Newt learned to milk the cow. We purchased an old gentle cow from, a man named Hackworth. So we named her Hackworth. As my husband had not learned, and did not wish to, the art of milking I had hither to performed that task, and Newt decided he would like to learn to milk too. So I allowed him to practice on this cow until he could do quite well. Then gradually he took the work over and I left it to him. One day he started to the lot with milk pail in hand, feeling somewhat reluctant about going. When he remarked I wish I had never seen old Hackworth. After that as the other boys grew up, each served their turns milking and attending to all out door work.

Our home where all eleven children were born and reared up to the year 1906, was in the South East part of San Saba Town, and occupied a whole block, with ample and pleasant play ground for the boys and girls in all seasons, and it was a happy and care free time with them. Mat and Frank hitches up the calf to take their little sister for a ride in their little wagon. They worked for quite a while with small ropes and strings, finally being satisfied with the harness and feeling sure the time was ripe to turn loose the calf, as Frank was just in the act of lifting little sister into the wagon, Matt turned loose the team. As they were in the back yard, and the calf was headed toward the side gate which stood open, He gave one jump and with head down and tail up, bellowing and pitching, off he went, with the boys bringing up the rear with yells, causing such din and clatter as to almost deafen you. When finally the poor frightened calf was run down, not a whole piece of that wagon could be found. Luckily they failed to get their little passenger on board.

Matt makes a rhyme. His Father was talking about getting a carpenter to do some work on our house, and Matt 7 years old exclaimed. Hire Mr. Blakeney. He will work and work until the whistle blows and drop his hammer and away he goes. Then one from Eblen who was his cousin Anna's pet, and who always hung around her when she was at home. One Day we were sitting on the back porch. She and Fannie sitting on the door step. Eblen as usual crowding and climbing over her. When she said Oh Eblen I think I will have to wean you. And he as I suspect had heard mothers discuss the best time of the year to wean their babies, exclaimed. Oh no cousin Anna, Not this time of the year.

Rush when Newt got married. Sitting in his little rocking chair seemingly in deep thought, gave a sigh and said. I am not going to get married ever, but am going to stay with you and papa as long as you will let me. And he kept his word by staying with us as long as we kept house. Then he married Miss Gladys Karnes, a sweet and good girl, and they now have two sweet and good looking boys. But, Alas February 3rd 1939 Rush lost his wife Gladys and the oldest of three little boys. B. R. the one that died was three years, three months and three Days old. The Mother and two oldest boys had scarlet fever. Gladys gave birth to a baby boy and died in six days after he was born. Both she and B. R. died within three days of each other. Frank Edward the second boy recovered, and he and his brother Howard Cleveland are both living with their Father and me. Alstyne my youngest child died the same year in June. Fannie my oldest Girl died also same year in October. I am 78 years old. Have had the dear children 6 years. God has given me strength and life, so far to take care of them. We have lived in San Saba, Waco, Austin and now in Sinton. When I was 72 years old I went on a trip to California, to get away from scenes and sorrow for a while. Mary and Billy went too. We had a very good time while there. A number of war ships were in port off the beach, and each day we went out and were permited to go on board of one. Had exciting times getting out to them and sometimes were well sprayed with water as the boats sped through the water. Also visited Catalina Island, on a large steam boat. Also was in the one with glass bottom. While there I visited one of my old friend's boys, Ed Peisken (?) and family. Had a very pleasant weeks visit with them. And such a nice family too. On Sunday which was my 72nd birthday, Ed took us all driving all over the county it seemed to me. Then we went to the Air Port in Los Angelos and (Ed's wife) Jessie and I were watching people take rides in the huge plane. So I said, lets go up too. She laughed at me. But said if I went she would go with me. So I said I am going. There are no children here to say no Mama. And I can do what I like. Come on. So she said well I promised and guess I will have to go. So we flew all over Holiwood and the canyons and Los Angelos. So I have ridden in ox carts and all other vehicles up to air planes.

Transcribed by Sally Jane Anderson Riggs, daughter of Mary Louise Collins Anderson, and granddaughter of Sallie Louise Allison Collins. I have tried to copy this just as she wrote it. Sometimes she spelled the same word two different ways. In places where I was really unsure of her writing, I put question marks. I believe that several of those were names. If anyone can give me a correction, I would be very glad to have it. I hope that everyone enjoys reading this as much as I have enjoyed typing it. I only wish there were more.


Sarah Daly McCormick

RESEARCHER-DESCENDANTS: Information sent by Lynette [laj1009@aol.com] to T.Mason on 26Feb2002. "When Sarah's mother died in 1895 Sarah was sent to live with her aunt Sarah Elizabeth Daly, who ran a boarding house.. This couple had 10 children."


Angalinia Davidson

Had four children by each husband.


Sarah Elizabeth Morgan

Had eight children according to the 1910 U.S. Census.