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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Thomas Potts Jr

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=90612593. "Thomas Potts, Jr. was the husband of Mary Borden Potts and father of the Rev. Joshua Potts and William Potts (William also buried in this cemetery). He was the son of Thomas Potts, Sr. and Joani Platts Potts, both born in Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. Thomas was buried February 4, 1754. He is also believed to have been married to Mary Records, with whom he had the following children; Ann, Mary, Nathaniel, Richard, Thomas and Rebecca Potts. Lastly Thomas was said to have married Rebecca Stacy Wright, widow of Joshua Wright." Image.


Thomas Potts

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=107780824. "Thomas was the son of Richard Pott and Ann Ashe of Derbyshire, Chesterfield, England. He arrived in Burlington (then known as Bridlington), New Jersey with his family aboard the ship "Shield" (which sailed from Hull, England) in 1678. In 1699 the family moved to Philadelphia, where Thomas resided until his death. He was a leather tanner by trade and was married three (possibly four) times.
No visible headstone." Image.


JoAnn Platts

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=107777782. "Ann was the wife of Thomas Potts, Sr., tanner, who arrived in Burlington, New Jersey aboard the ship the "Shield" in December 1678. No visible headstone." Image.


Christopher Almy

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24009371. "~Son of: William Almy & Audrey Barlowe
~Husband of: Elizabeth Cornell: m. 9 Jul 1661
~Father of: Sarah Almy [b:1662]
- sp.: Richard Cadman
- sp.: Jonathan Merihew
Elizabeth ALMY [b: 1663]
- sp.: Lewis Morris
- sp.: John Leonard
William ALMY [b: 1665]
- sp.: Deborah COOK [b: 1665]
- sp.: Hope BORDEN [b: 1685]
Ann ALMY [b: 1667]
- sp.: Richard DURFEE
- sp.: Benjamin JEFFERSON
Christopher ALMY [1669-1746]
- sp.: Joanna SLOCUM [b.1672 m.1690]
- sp.: Mary [b: 1670]
Rebecca ALMY [1671-1708]
- sp.: John TOWNSEND [m.1692]
John ALMY [1673-1673]
Capt. Job Almy [1675-1754]
- sp.: Anstis Lawton [1678-1739 m.1696]
- sp.: Abigail Remington [1677-1763 m.1740]." Image.

2Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, pg 9, 929.273 C815cc. "Elizabeth2 Cornell, bap. 15 Jan. 1637 at Saffron-Walden, d. 1708; m. Christopher Almy of Portsmouth, son of William, on July 9, 1661; Christopher was b. in England in 1632, d. Jan. 30, 1713. He was admitted Freeman of Portsmouth in 1658.

Ch. Almy:
i. Sarah, b. Apr. 7, 1662, d. 1708; m. (1) Richard Cadman, (2) Jonathan Mayhew.
ii. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 29, 1663, d. 1712; m. (1) John Morris, (2) John Leonard,
ill. William, b. Oct. 27, 1665, d. July 6, 1747; m. (1) Deborah Cook (2) Hope Borden,
iv. Ann, b. Nov. 29, 1667; m. (1) Richard Durfee, (2) Benjamin Jefferson,
v. Christopher, b. Dec. 29, 1669; m. (1) Joanna Slocum on Apr. 16, 1690 (2) Mary Briar,
vi. Rebecca, b. Jan. 26, 1671, d. 1708; m. Thomas Townsend, Apr. 28,1692.
vii. John, b, Apr. 1673, d. 1673.
viii. Job, b. Oct. 10, 1675.

1667—Christopher Almy and several others bought lands of the Indians at Monmouth, New Jersey. They lived here several years, but returned to R. I. by 1680.

1680—On March 5, Almy along with several others bought Pocasset (Tiverton) lands for £1100. He held three and three quarter shares out of thirty; their purchase was from Gov. Josiah Winslow.

1690—He was elected Deputy, also assistant (Colonial Senator). On Feb. 27, he was elected Governor, but refused to serve for reasons satisfactory to the Assembly.

1693—On Aug. 24, he was sent from Rhode Island to England to present the Colony's grievances to Queen Mary. On Oct. 28, the Assembly allowed him £135 10s. 8d. for his expenses.

1713—Feb. 9, his will was proved. There were several beguests to his children and grandchildren. Some got £10, others £20, and one is granted 10s for a bible; wife inherits negro man Cumbo, and woman Margaret for life (negroes to be freed and granted a bed, cow, and use of 20 acres in Pocasset for balance of their lives after the death of Elizabeth); to wife, two cows, horses, and best feather bed, housing and land in Rhode Island for life, half of fruit from orchard and all household goods. (Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of R. I.)." Source Image. Citation Image.


Elizabeth Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, pg 9, 929.273 C815cc. "Elizabeth2 Cornell, bap. 15 Jan. 1637 at Saffron-Walden, d. 1708; m. Christopher Almy of Portsmouth, son of William, on July 9, 1661; Christopher was b. in England in 1632, d. Jan. 30, 1713. He was admitted Freeman of Portsmouth in 1658.

Ch. Almy:
i. Sarah, b. Apr. 7, 1662, d. 1708; m. (1) Richard Cadman, (2) Jonathan Mayhew.
ii. Elizabeth, b. Sept. 29, 1663, d. 1712; m. (1) John Morris, (2) John Leonard,
ill. William, b. Oct. 27, 1665, d. July 6, 1747; m. (1) Deborah Cook (2) Hope Borden,
iv. Ann, b. Nov. 29, 1667; m. (1) Richard Durfee, (2) Benjamin Jefferson,
v. Christopher, b. Dec. 29, 1669; m. (1) Joanna Slocum on Apr. 16, 1690 (2) Mary Briar,
vi. Rebecca, b. Jan. 26, 1671, d. 1708; m. Thomas Townsend, Apr. 28,1692.
vii. John, b, Apr. 1673, d. 1673.
viii. Job, b. Oct. 10, 1675.

1667—Christopher Almy and several others bought lands of the Indians at Monmouth, New Jersey. They lived here several years, but returned to R. I. by 1680.

1680—On March 5, Almy along with several others bought Pocasset (Tiverton) lands for £1100. He held three and three quarter shares out of thirty; their purchase was from Gov. Josiah Winslow.

1690—He was elected Deputy, also assistant (Colonial Senator). On Feb. 27, he was elected Governor, but refused to serve for reasons satisfactory to the Assembly.

1693—On Aug. 24, he was sent from Rhode Island to England to present the Colony's grievances to Queen Mary. On Oct. 28, the Assembly allowed him £135 10s. 8d. for his expenses.

1713—Feb. 9, his will was proved. There were several beguests to his children and grandchildren. Some got £10, others £20, and one is granted 10s for a bible; wife inherits negro man Cumbo, and woman Margaret for life (negroes to be freed and granted a bed, cow, and use of 20 acres in Pocasset for balance of their lives after the death of Elizabeth); to wife, two cows, horses, and best feather bed, housing and land in Rhode Island for life, half of fruit from orchard and all household goods. (Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of R. I.)." Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24023720. "~Daughter of: Thomas Cornell & Rebecca Briggs
~Wife of: Christopher Almy: m. 9 Jul 1661." Image.


John Borden

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: John BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 24 Dec 1695
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724." Principal in Birth Extract.

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 63, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.

3Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8M5-R2W. "Name: John Borden
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 24 Dec 1695
Birthplace: Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father's Name: Richard Borden
Mother's Name: Innosent
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I09374-6
System Origin: Rhode Island-EASy
GS Film number: 913052
Reference ID: p5

Citing this Record:
"Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F8M5-R2W : 6 December 2014), Innosent in entry for John Borden, 24 Dec 1695; citing Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, reference p5; FHL microfilm 913,052." Image.


Hannah Allen

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: John BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 24 Dec 1695
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724." Principal in Birth Extract.


John Borden

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: John BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 24 Dec 1695
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724." Principal in Birth Extract.

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 63, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.

3Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8M5-R2W. "Name: John Borden
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 24 Dec 1695
Birthplace: Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father's Name: Richard Borden
Mother's Name: Innosent
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I09374-6
System Origin: Rhode Island-EASy
GS Film number: 913052
Reference ID: p5

Citing this Record:
"Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F8M5-R2W : 6 December 2014), Innosent in entry for John Borden, 24 Dec 1695; citing Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, reference p5; FHL microfilm 913,052." Image.


Ruth Peckham

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: John BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 24 Dec 1695
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724." Principal in Birth Extract.


Thomas Borden

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Thomas BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 08 Dec 1697
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innocent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."

2William Richard Cutter, Eugene C. Gardner, Harlan Hodge Ballard, et al., Massachusetts, Encyclopedia of: Biographical - Genealogical, New York, Boston, Chicago: American Historical Society, 1916. Vol. 5, pg. 245, 1690/1724, New Bedford Public Library, G 920.C984___. "Thomas, second son of Richard and Innocent (Wardell) Borden, born Dec. 8, 1697, lived in Tiverton, Rhode Island, where he died in April, 1740. He owned that part of the south side of the Fall River stream which lay below the Great Fall, and adjoining land, down to the salt water, besides other landed estates and outside lands.  He married, August 14, 1721, Mary, daughter of Christopher and Meribah Gifford, born October 6, 1695. Children: Richard, Christopher, born October 10, 1726, Deborah, Mary and Rebecca."

3Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 63, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.

4Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8M4-TV2. Image.


Joseph Fuller Borden

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Joseph BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 04 Nov 1702
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."

2Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 63, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.

3Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 92, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "                    36. Richard, Fall River
133.
134.
135.
136.
137. Joseph, born November 4, 1702. He learned the trade of a clothier, and while quite young carried on that business in the old fulling mill build by Col. Benjamin Church on the Fall River near to the head of the Great Falls. He pursued his business with diligence, and there being no competing establishment near him, soon obtained a good run of business, as it was the custom in those days for every family to manufacture their own woolen clothes, which required fulling and dressing by those who understood the business.
  Joseph Borden married Abigail Russel of Dartmouth, June 24, 1730; she was a sister of Caleb Russell, who, April 2, 1734, married his sister Rebecca, and who, in 1640 (sic 1840), became the guardian of Joseph's children. Mr. Borden was now very pleasantly situated, his father had given him a deed of one-half of the water power on the south side of the river from the foot of the Great Falls to the main road, together with the half of all the buildings upon the adjoining lands, and in 1732, by the will of his father, proved July 25, the other half of this property was given to him, besides other landed estate. At this time he had two children, Abraham and Patience, and no doubt was looking forward with pleasing anticipation to the future. But God, without whose notice not a sparrow falleth to the ground, had marked out for him a different course. P5e was permitted to enjoy his prosperity but little more than two years after the death of his father, when he was suddenly struck down in a moment. He was working alone in his mill at the time, and it is supposed that in attempting to adjust some part of the machinery he received a blow

pg. 93

which instantly killed him. ... The death of Mr. Borden was entered on the records of the Friend's Monthly Meeting at Newport as occurring December, 1736. His widow married a young man by the name of --- Jencks, who was an apprentice to her husband, who was an aDprentice to her husband, who continued the business, and greatly aseisted her in managing the estate of Mr. Borden and in bringing up his children, until the eldest son, Abraham, was old enoui^h to take charge of it. He, too. became a clothier.

  Joseph Borden and his family were members of the Friends Society of Tiverton. Caleb Russell of Dartmouth was appointed grardian of the children of Joseph Borden of Tiverton, being minors under 14 years of age, October 21, 1740. ..."

4Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8M5-R2F. Image.

5FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=50548322. "Note: Husband of Abigail Russell who was born March 19, 1711."


Abigail Russell

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Joseph BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 04 Nov 1702
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."


Samuel Borden

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Samuell BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 25 Oct 1705
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."

2Carile Santos, Richard Borden of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, pg 1207, FHL 1597740 Item 14. From publication, "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history" published in Buffalo, N.Y. by Harry Ferris Johnston from 1947 to 1959. Image.

3Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 93-94, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "138. SAMUEL, born Oct. 25, 1705; married Peace Mumford of Exeter, R. I., about 1735. "His opportunity for an education was the same as farmers' boys usually receive, hard work in the spring, summer and fall, and a little schooling in the winter, when it is not good logging, as the family wanted firewood drawn to the door. But amid all these hindrances, by degrees he acquired the rudiments of a common school education, to which he afterwards added a good knowledge of the art of surveying, which he might have obtained from his father, who was a practical and not a theoretical mathematician merely.
    But to return to Samuel. He applied himself so faithfully to the study of mathematics and the practice of surveying that he soon became an accomplished surveyor, who was well-known beyond the limits of his native town or county. And when the order came from England to Gov. Shirley of Massachusetts to send a suitable person to Novia Scotia to take charge of the company of emigrants and locate them on the lands from which the neutral French had been expelled, the Governor appointed Mr. Borden.
    The country to which Mr. Borden was now sent formerly belonged to France, and bore the name of Acadia, and contained a mixed population of French and Indians. By the treaty of Utretch in 1713 the Acadians were brought under the government of England, and were bound by agreement, in case of future wars between France and England, to remain neutral. Hence they were called the "Neutral French" of Nova Scotia. For forty years, says Barry in his History of Massachusetts, they were neglected by England, and in that time they prospered, and their substance increased. The crops from their fields were exceedingly rich. Flocks and herds grazed in their meadows or roamed over their hills; domestic fowls abouncied; and the thickly clustered village of neat thatched roofed cottages sheltered a frugal, happy people. The spinning wheel and the loom were busily plied; and from morn till night the matrons and maidens, young men and their sires, tolled for the bread which they ate in peace. But when the French troops entered Nova Scotia, the Acadians were delighted to hear the sounds of their native tongue; and received them with great cordiality, and supplied their necessities. In all this they barely expressed their preference for the people who spoke their language, professed their religion and from whom they had derivea their origin. It was perfectly natural that they should have acted thus, and perfectly corsistent with their obligations to remain neutral in time of war.
    But Gov. Shirley, as soon as he heard of the transaction, determixied to execute vengeance on these unfortunate people, and got authority for this purpose. He went to England, and by a false representation of this whole affair, procured instructions to the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia sufficiently broad to annihilate the whole settlement of Acadia. Having accomplished his fiendish designs in England, Shirley hastened back to America,, and sent the instructions to Gov. Lawrence of Nova Scotia, who resolved at once to carry out the instructions to the letter. In vain did they plead for mercy; in vain did they beg their oppressors to allow them to emigrate out of their jurisdiction; and finally, when they found that the Governor was determined to drive them from the homes they loved and scatter them as exiles over the whole length of the English colonies, they again besought the Governor to allow that each family might depart in the same vessel; but this he would not grant, though it was sought with tears by them all. The men were seized wherever they could be found and hurried on board of the transports which Shirley had provided, not being allowed any communication with their families. At Grand Prie they used strategy. They ordered all the males to meet in the church to hear a proclamation read from the King, and when they had obeyed the summons they were immediately surrounded by British troops and marched directly to the shore where the transports weie waiting to receive them. When the males had thus been secured, the women and children who begged to go with their husbands and fathers, were coldly told that they must wait until more transports could be obtained. The horror and anguish produced by this answer cannot be described, nor even conceived. In this inhuman manner 7000 men were sent as fast as transports could be procured, and scattered along our coast from Maine to Georgia without either friends or money or even a knowledge of our language, and it is not probable that many of these husbands and brothers ever met again in this world.
    This expulsion of the Aeadians occurred in 1755, soon after the fcundation of Halifax by Gen. Edward Cornwallis, a brother of Lord Cornwallis of Revolutionary memory. It was not long afterwards, in 1760, that Samuel Borden went to Nova Scotia, but it is not known how long he was employed there. He settled his son Perry on this
tract, who married Emma Percy, the daughter of a British officer, in 1761. After his return home, Mr. Borden led a retired life, cultivating his farm. In 176S he made his will, September 1, and it was proved in Tiverton December 7, 1778, having died probably in November."

4Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 63, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.

5Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8M5-R2V. Image.


Peace Mumford

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Samuell BORDEN
Sex: Male
Birth Date: 25 Oct 1705
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."

2Carile Santos, Richard Borden of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, pg 1207, FHL 1597740 Item 14. From publication, "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history" published in Buffalo, N.Y. by Harry Ferris Johnston from 1947 to 1959. Image.

3Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 93-94, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "138. SAMUEL, born Oct. 25, 1705; married Peace Mumford of Exeter, R. I., about 1735. "His opportunity for an education was the same as farmers' boys usually receive, hard work in the spring, summer and fall, and a little schooling in the winter, when it is not good logging, as the family wanted firewood drawn to the door. But amid all these hindrances, by degrees he acquired the rudiments of a common school education, to which he afterwards added a good knowledge of the art of surveying, which he might have obtained from his father, who was a practical and not a theoretical mathematician merely.
    But to return to Samuel. He applied himself so faithfully to the study of mathematics and the practice of surveying that he soon became an accomplished surveyor, who was well-known beyond the limits of his native town or county. And when the order came from England to Gov. Shirley of Massachusetts to send a suitable person to Novia Scotia to take charge of the company of emigrants and locate them on the lands from which the neutral French had been expelled, the Governor appointed Mr. Borden.
    The country to which Mr. Borden was now sent formerly belonged to France, and bore the name of Acadia, and contained a mixed population of French and Indians. By the treaty of Utretch in 1713 the Acadians were brought under the government of England, and were bound by agreement, in case of future wars between France and England, to remain neutral. Hence they were called the "Neutral French" of Nova Scotia. For forty years, says Barry in his History of Massachusetts, they were neglected by England, and in that time they prospered, and their substance increased. The crops from their fields were exceedingly rich. Flocks and herds grazed in their meadows or roamed over their hills; domestic fowls abouncied; and the thickly clustered village of neat thatched roofed cottages sheltered a frugal, happy people. The spinning wheel and the loom were busily plied; and from morn till night the matrons and maidens, young men and their sires, tolled for the bread which they ate in peace. But when the French troops entered Nova Scotia, the Acadians were delighted to hear the sounds of their native tongue; and received them with great cordiality, and supplied their necessities. In all this they barely expressed their preference for the people who spoke their language, professed their religion and from whom they had derivea their origin. It was perfectly natural that they should have acted thus, and perfectly corsistent with their obligations to remain neutral in time of war.
    But Gov. Shirley, as soon as he heard of the transaction, determixied to execute vengeance on these unfortunate people, and got authority for this purpose. He went to England, and by a false representation of this whole affair, procured instructions to the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia sufficiently broad to annihilate the whole settlement of Acadia. Having accomplished his fiendish designs in England, Shirley hastened back to America,, and sent the instructions to Gov. Lawrence of Nova Scotia, who resolved at once to carry out the instructions to the letter. In vain did they plead for mercy; in vain did they beg their oppressors to allow them to emigrate out of their jurisdiction; and finally, when they found that the Governor was determined to drive them from the homes they loved and scatter them as exiles over the whole length of the English colonies, they again besought the Governor to allow that each family might depart in the same vessel; but this he would not grant, though it was sought with tears by them all. The men were seized wherever they could be found and hurried on board of the transports which Shirley had provided, not being allowed any communication with their families. At Grand Prie they used strategy. They ordered all the males to meet in the church to hear a proclamation read from the King, and when they had obeyed the summons they were immediately surrounded by British troops and marched directly to the shore where the transports weie waiting to receive them. When the males had thus been secured, the women and children who begged to go with their husbands and fathers, were coldly told that they must wait until more transports could be obtained. The horror and anguish produced by this answer cannot be described, nor even conceived. In this inhuman manner 7000 men were sent as fast as transports could be procured, and scattered along our coast from Maine to Georgia without either friends or money or even a knowledge of our language, and it is not probable that many of these husbands and brothers ever met again in this world.
    This expulsion of the Aeadians occurred in 1755, soon after the fcundation of Halifax by Gen. Edward Cornwallis, a brother of Lord Cornwallis of Revolutionary memory. It was not long afterwards, in 1760, that Samuel Borden went to Nova Scotia, but it is not known how long he was employed there. He settled his son Perry on this
tract, who married Emma Percy, the daughter of a British officer, in 1761. After his return home, Mr. Borden led a retired life, cultivating his farm. In 176S he made his will, September 1, and it was proved in Tiverton December 7, 1778, having died probably in November."


Caleb Russell

1Rhode Island Marriages, 1724-1916, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F8KB-7FD, FamilySearch.org. Image.

2Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Rebekah BORDEN
Sex: Female
Birth Date: 18 Jul 1712
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."

3Carile Santos, Richard Borden of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, pg 1108, FHL 1597740 Item 14. From publication, "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history" published in Buffalo, N.Y. by Harry Ferris Johnston from 1947 to 1959. Image.


Rebecca Borden

1Rhode Island, Tiverton, Newport (Extracted Civil records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), Birth - FHL Number 913076, 1690/1724. "Extract: Vital Records Index - North America
Birth event for: Rebekah BORDEN
Sex: Female
Birth Date: 18 Jul 1712
Recorded in: Civil Records for Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island
Father: Richard BORDEN
Mother: Innosent
Source: FHL Number 913076   Dates: 1690-1724."

2Carile Santos, Richard Borden of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, pg 1108, FHL 1597740 Item 14. From publication, "Your ancestors, a national magazine of genealogy and family history" published in Buffalo, N.Y. by Harry Ferris Johnston from 1947 to 1959. Image.

3Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Society, Rhode Island, Tiverton, computer printout, 1636-1850, Extracted from Vital record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, vol. 4, pt. 7. Tiverton. 974.5 V2a vol. 4., pg 63, FHL US/CAN Film 933413 Item 10.

4Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F89K-GR4. Image.

5Rhode Island Marriages, 1724-1916, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F8KB-7FD, FamilySearch.org. Image.