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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Sarah Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, page 2, 929.273 C815cc. "Sarah, eldest child of Thomas and Rebecca Cornell, bap. Mar. 30, 1623 at Saffron Walden; m. Thomas Willett of Bristol, England, in the Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam on Sept. 1, 1643; Thomas d. ca. 1645; m. (2) Charles Bridges on Nov. 3, 1647; Charles d. Aug. 5, 1682; m. (3) John Lawrence Jr., eldest son of John and Susannah Lawrence on Nov. 20, 1682; John b. 1644, d. 1697.

Ch. Willett:
i. William, bap. June 27, 1644, d. 1701; Gov. Kieft was sponsor bap.
ii. Thomas, bap. Nov. 26, 1645, d. 1722; m. Helen Stoothoff.
iii. Elizabeth (?), m. Robert Beachman.

Sarah's other children are not listed, but the "Thomas Book" by Rev. Lawrence Thomas, states that "John Lawrence Esq. of his Majesty's Council, having a son non compos mentis (with) personal estate at Jamaica, his wife is appointed guardian by Gov. Benjamin Fletcher."

1647—John Dolling, one of her admirers, but evidently not a welcome suitor, was ordered by the court "not to visit nor trouble Sarah Willett."

1650—Sponsor for Samuel Woolsey; 1650, sponsor for Elizabeth Cornell, dau. of Richard2.

1664—Charles Bridges and Sarah, his wife, enter a complaint against William Newman and Thomas Senequam, an Indian. Gov. Nicholls ordered the constable of Westchester to "deliver unto Mr. Bridges and his wife or their assigns, the goods that lye attached in your hands as of right belonging to them."

1665—They sue Thomas Pell of Onkway, Conn., who laid claim to Cornell's Neck, on the grounds that the land was under the government of Connecticut, that the Dutch occupation was never legal, and that he had bought the land of the natives in 1654, and paid for it. The case was decided in their favor, viz.: "that the land in question doeth of right belong to the plaintiff and that the defendant shall pay the costs and charges of suit, and six pence damage."
  Sarah Cornell, alias Bridges, conveyed her interest to William Willett her eldest son, who obtained a patent therefore on April 15, 1667, from Gov. Richard Nicholls (Albany Book of Patents, Vol. II, P. 65).
  From this lawsuit, it appeared a grant and patent from the Dutch Governor Kieft to Thomas Cornell, deceased, father of Sarah, was produced and read in court; that Thomas Cornell was in lawful possession of this estate for some years; that he was at considerable charges in building and other improvements; that he was driven off his lands by the barbarous violence of the Indians who burned his house and goods and destroyed his cattle; that Thomas Cornell's widow was left sole executrix of her deceased husband's last will and testament, and so had power to convey the premises.

1668—Sarah Bridges and Richard Cornell executors of Beachman, who may have married Elizabeth, dau. of Sarah.

1673--Sarah and Rebecca appointed their brother Richard as their attorney to collect moneys under their mother's will.

1682--Charles and Sarah Bridges' joint will proved as to death of Charles: to our son, Thomas Willett, half of certain lands. John Lawrence was witness.

The Willetts were a family of considerable prominence in the early history of the colony and filled many political and military offices. Cornell's Neck remained in possession of the family for over 100 years. Charles Bridges, Sarah's second husband, was English Secretary for the Province under Governor Stuyvesant. He was a member of the Governor's Council, Military Commissary, patentee of Flushing and Gravesend. He lived on Pearl Street, N. Y. C. and left an estate of £400. (CG)." Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/183824842/sarah-briggs. "Sarah was first married to Thomas Willet and had children, William b 1644, Thomas b 1645 and perhaps Elizabeth.

After Thomas died, Sarah married Charles Briggs on November 3, 1647." Image.


Charles Bridges

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, pg 2, 929.273 C815cc. "1664—Charles Bridges and Sarah, his wife, enter a complaint against William Newman and Thomas Senequam, an Indian. Gov. Nlcholls ordered the constable of Westchester to "deliver unto Mr. Bridges and his wife or their assigns, the goods that lye attached in your hands as of right belonging to them."

1665—They sue Thomas Pell of Onkway, Conn., who laid claim to Cornell's Neck, on the grounds that the land was under the government of Connecticut, that the Dutch occupation was never legal, and that he had bought the land of the natives in 1654, and paid for it. The case was decided in their favor, viz.: "that the land in question doeth of right belong to the plaintiff and that the defendant shall pay the costs and charges of suit, and six pence damage."

Sarah Cornell, alias Bridges, conveyed her interest to William Willett her eldest son, who obtained a patent therefore on April 15, 1667, from Gov. Richard Nicholls (Albany Book of Patents, Vol. II, P. 65).

From this lawsuit, it appeared a grant and patent from the Dutch Governor Kieft to Thomas Cornell, deceased, father of Sarah, was produced and read in court; that Thomas Cornell was in lawful possession of this estate for some years; that he was at considerable charges in building and other improvements; that he was driven off his lands by the barbarous violence of the Indians who burned his house and goods and destroyed his cattle; that Thomas Cornell's widow was left sole executrix of her deceased husband's last will and testament, and so had power to convey the premises.

1668—Sarah Bridges and Richard Cornell executors of Beachman, who may have married Elizabeth, dau. of Sarah.

1673--Sarah and Rebecca appointed their brother Richard as their attorney to collect moneys under their mother's will.

1682--Charles and Sarah Bridges' joint will proved as to death of Charles: to our son, Thomas Willett, half of certain lands. John Lawrence was witness." Source Image. Citation Image.


Sarah Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, page 2, 929.273 C815cc. "Sarah, eldest child of Thomas and Rebecca Cornell, bap. Mar. 30, 1623 at Saffron Walden; m. Thomas Willett of Bristol, England, in the Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam on Sept. 1, 1643; Thomas d. ca. 1645; m. (2) Charles Bridges on Nov. 3, 1647; Charles d. Aug. 5, 1682; m. (3) John Lawrence Jr., eldest son of John and Susannah Lawrence on Nov. 20, 1682; John b. 1644, d. 1697.

Ch. Willett:
i. William, bap. June 27, 1644, d. 1701; Gov. Kieft was sponsor bap.
ii. Thomas, bap. Nov. 26, 1645, d. 1722; m. Helen Stoothoff.
iii. Elizabeth (?), m. Robert Beachman.

Sarah's other children are not listed, but the "Thomas Book" by Rev. Lawrence Thomas, states that "John Lawrence Esq. of his Majesty's Council, having a son non compos mentis (with) personal estate at Jamaica, his wife is appointed guardian by Gov. Benjamin Fletcher."

1647—John Dolling, one of her admirers, but evidently not a welcome suitor, was ordered by the court "not to visit nor trouble Sarah Willett."

1650—Sponsor for Samuel Woolsey; 1650, sponsor for Elizabeth Cornell, dau. of Richard2.

1664—Charles Bridges and Sarah, his wife, enter a complaint against William Newman and Thomas Senequam, an Indian. Gov. Nicholls ordered the constable of Westchester to "deliver unto Mr. Bridges and his wife or their assigns, the goods that lye attached in your hands as of right belonging to them."

1665—They sue Thomas Pell of Onkway, Conn., who laid claim to Cornell's Neck, on the grounds that the land was under the government of Connecticut, that the Dutch occupation was never legal, and that he had bought the land of the natives in 1654, and paid for it. The case was decided in their favor, viz.: "that the land in question doeth of right belong to the plaintiff and that the defendant shall pay the costs and charges of suit, and six pence damage."
  Sarah Cornell, alias Bridges, conveyed her interest to William Willett her eldest son, who obtained a patent therefore on April 15, 1667, from Gov. Richard Nicholls (Albany Book of Patents, Vol. II, P. 65).
  From this lawsuit, it appeared a grant and patent from the Dutch Governor Kieft to Thomas Cornell, deceased, father of Sarah, was produced and read in court; that Thomas Cornell was in lawful possession of this estate for some years; that he was at considerable charges in building and other improvements; that he was driven off his lands by the barbarous violence of the Indians who burned his house and goods and destroyed his cattle; that Thomas Cornell's widow was left sole executrix of her deceased husband's last will and testament, and so had power to convey the premises.

1668—Sarah Bridges and Richard Cornell executors of Beachman, who may have married Elizabeth, dau. of Sarah.

1673--Sarah and Rebecca appointed their brother Richard as their attorney to collect moneys under their mother's will.

1682--Charles and Sarah Bridges' joint will proved as to death of Charles: to our son, Thomas Willett, half of certain lands. John Lawrence was witness.

The Willetts were a family of considerable prominence in the early history of the colony and filled many political and military offices. Cornell's Neck remained in possession of the family for over 100 years. Charles Bridges, Sarah's second husband, was English Secretary for the Province under Governor Stuyvesant. He was a member of the Governor's Council, Military Commissary, patentee of Flushing and Gravesend. He lived on Pearl Street, N. Y. C. and left an estate of £400. (CG)." Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/183824842/sarah-briggs. "Sarah was first married to Thomas Willet and had children, William b 1644, Thomas b 1645 and perhaps Elizabeth.

After Thomas died, Sarah married Charles Briggs on November 3, 1647." Image.


Thomas H Kent

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/183505259/thomas-kent. Image.


Ann Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, page 6, 929.273 C815cc. "Ann2 Cornell, bap. 2 Aug. 1635 at Saffron-Walden; m. Thomas Kent prior to 1659.
1659—Thomas and Ann Kent are given ten acres of land in Portsmouth by her mother, Rebecca Cornell.
1664--[Rebecca's will] To 2nd. daughter, Ann, 10 A. in Portsmouth near George (B)ayton's and after her decease and that of her husband, Thomas, to her dau. Sarah.

Ch. Kent:
i. Sarah." Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/183505359/ann-kent. Image.


George Woolsey Jr

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=48697065. Image.


Rebecca Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, page 8, 929.273 C815cc. "Rebecca2 Cornell, the third dau. in her mother's will, was bap. Jan. 13, 1630, at Saffron-Walden; m. George Woolsey, 1610-1698, at New Amsterdam on Dec. 9, 1647. George was the son of the Rev. Benjamin Woolsey of Yarmouth, England. Rebecca was buried on Feb. 5, 1713, aet. 91. This would indicate she was b. some eighty years prior to baptism.

Ch. Woolsey:
1. Sarah, bap. Aug. 7, 1650; m. William Hallett of Newtown, L. I.
ii. Capt. George, bap. Oct. 10, 1652, d. Jan. 19, 1740; m. Hannah .
iii. Thomas, b. 1655; m. Ruth ; Res. Bedford, Westchester Co. N. Y.
iv. John, Bap. Jan. 16, 1661; m. Abigail . Res. Jamaica in 1711.
v. Rebecca, bap. Feb. 13, 1659; m. Wiggins.
vi. Mary, bap. Mar. 9, 1664; unmarried at time of father's will,
vii. William, bap. June 30, 1678, of "reasonable age." Not named in father's will or listed in "The Desc. of Rev. Benjamin Woolsey" by Benjamin W. Dwight.

1651—Rebecca sponsored the baptism of Jacobus Mott.

1662—George & Rebecca sponsored the bap. of Elizabeth, dau. of Richard2.

1664—Granted land at Jamaica, L. I. by the town.

1673—Rebecca was witness at the trial of her brother Thomas2; gave power of attorney to her brother Richard for collection of legacies from mother's will. George was chosen town clerk of Jamaica. The will of George Woolsey was proven on Feb. 22, 1698/9. It reads: "George Woolsey, of Jamaica, weak of body, gives his oldest son George his land at Beaver Pond; to son Thomas, the 15 acre lot west of Anton Waters; to son John, his 30 acre lot by the Little Plains, and 2 oxen, and all his wearing apparel; to daughter Mary, 1 feather bed and bolster, 2 pillows, 1 pr. sheets, and 2 coverlets, to be delivered on day of marriage or when 18 years of age; to wife Rebecca, the remainder of his lands and tenements, goods and chattels, during her lifetime. At her decease, the lands and tenements not already given, he gives to his three sons, George, Thomas, and John, to be equally divided; his goods and chattels to his 3 daughters, Sarah Hallett, Rebecca Wiggins and Mary Woolsey. George Woolsey was a boy of 13 when he emigrated to America from England. The descendants of George and Rebecca are numerous and distinguished in the military and ministry.

Theodore Dwight Woolsey was the president of Yale, 1846-71." Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=142451118. "Rebecca Cornell was the daughter of Thomas Cornell and Rebecca Briggs. She came with her family to America in 1636 settling in Jamaica, New Netherland. In December 1647, Rebecca married Capt. George Woolsey. The had eight children: Sarah, George, Thomas, Rebecca, John, Mary, William, Marritje (Mary).

At the age of 43, tragedy struck her family when her brother Thomas was hanged for the murder of her mother. The story was printed in a booklet in 1930 by the Old Stone Bank of Providence, Rhode Island. "Unsolved Murder" can be found in the "Woolsey Genealogy Website Directory," provided by Wilford Whitaker and Carolyn Woolsey Wilkerson, under "Descendants of George (aka Joris) Woolsey."

Rebecca (Cornell) Woolsey was buried in the Grace Church Burial Ground, where she worshipped for many years. A record of her burial is found on the Web under "Grace Church, Jamaica, New York, Burials - Olive Tree Genealogy," as follows:

"Register of Rev. John Poyer, July 22, 1710 to Nov. 28, 1731

"Persons buried Ye time Wn & Place where:

"Rebeca Woolsey, aged 91, 2/5/1713, at Jamaica"

[See "Burials Grace Church, Jamaica, New York 1710-1731; Origin and History of Grace Church, Jamaica, New York; by Horation Oliver Ladd, published by Shakespeare Press, New York, 1914; found at library of New-York Historical Society, 2004." http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/nn/church/jamaicanydeath.shtml]

In 1699, the 'old stone Church' was erected as a place of worship by the Presbyterians. In 1702 Grace church was established and the Reverend Patrick Gordon, a Chaplain in the Royal Navy, was appointed Rector of Queens by the Bishop of London. A new building was constructed and consecrated in 1822 through the generosity of the Honorable Rufus King, the first Ambassador to England. It was destroyed by fire 30 years later, as was the second building in 1861. By September 1862, a new church was built for worship by the Jamaica community. This Grace church has existed for over 316 years from its founding in 1699. Today, the church is no longer Presbyterian but Episcopal. It is the second oldest Episcopal Church in the State of New York, Trinity Church in Manhattan being the first. [ http://historicgrace.org/church-history/ ]." Image.


John Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, page 9, 929.273 C815cc. "John2 Cornell, bap. 6 June 1634 at Saffron-Walden; m. Mary Russell, dau. of John and Dorothy Russell of Dartmouth. Both John Russell and his daughter testified at the trial of Thomas2. Long Island genealogies written in 1895 by Thomas Powell assign the following three children: Richard, Caleb and Mary. Glazier finds these six offspring:

Ch. Cornell:
1. John Jr., b. ca. 1663; m. Mary Starr, dau. of John Starr of Hempstead; moved to Danbury, Conn,
ii. Rebecca, b. ca. 1665, d. 15 July 1739 aet. 74; m. Capt. Josiah Starr,
ill. Joshua, b. ca. 166-; m. Sarah Thome; moved to Greenwich, Ct.
iv, Richard, b. 1675 (Quaker records 1670); m. Hannah Thome, 1678-1756; moved to Scarsdale, N. Y. in 1730; will probated in 1757.
v. Mary, b. 1679; m. James Sands in 1697.
vi. Caleb, b. 1683, m. Elizabeth Hagner in 1705, (2) Phebe (Titus) Haight in 1743.

1673—John was directed to settle the estate of his brother, Thomas2.

1676--John with wife and five small children were driven from the eastward by the Indians. He was granted land at Cow Neck in Hemstead, Long Island. CG says that John and Mary were buried in the family plot on their property.

1705—Deeds indicate that both parents were deceased." Image.


Stephen Cornell

1Recorded by Chester Clair Cornell; edited by Elisabeth Cornell, Cornell family history: from County Essex, England to Winneshiek County, Iowa, page 15, 929.273 C815cc. "Stephen3 Cornell, 1656-1723, (Thomas2 Thomas), b. Portsmouth, R. I., the third son of Thomas2 and Elizabeth; m. Hannah Mosher, dau. of Hugh and Rebecca (Maxson) Mosher. (Mosher Genealogy)

Ch. Cornell:
23. Elizabeth, m. (1) Richard Sisson, (2) Peleg Tripp, Jan, 29, 1712.
24. Thomas, m. Widow Alice Thomas at Freetown, 1727. (Glazier)
25. William, d. 1755; m. Mehitabel Fish.
26. Stephen, d. ca. 1765; m, Ruth Pierce, June 10, 1719; Res. Swansea.
27. John, d. 1762; m. Sarah Shearman; conveyed to William on March 18, 1728/9 (Bristol Co. deeds lib. 19, p. 7)
28. Jonathan, m. Hannah Shearman. (Glazier)
29. Edward, d. 1754; m. Susannah Wilcox, 1729. (Glazier)
30. Richard1, b. Jan. 28, 1701/2, d. Feb. 27, 1761. (Dartmouth VR)
31. James, m. Abigail Tripp, Sept. 20, 1734 (2) Rebecca Tripp, 1766.

1673—Witness at his father's trial.

1686—Admitted as freeman of Portsmouth.

1688—Served as Grand Juror at Portsmouth.

1691, Apr. 2—Conveyed, with brother Thomas, land in Portsmouth to George Sisson of Portsmouth for £90 of "currant silver mony" of New England. Property was listed as 12 acres bounded southerly by property of John Cooke and Lott
Strange, westerly by the highway, northerly by land of Anthony Shaws, easterly by land of George Sissons, and included all dwelling houses, out houses and commons. (R. I. Land Evidences, Vol. I, p. 233-234)

1716—Stephen and Hannah deeded property in Dartmouth to their son William.

In 1755, when William transferred this property to his son Caleb, it was called the former homestead of Stephen Cornell, deceased of Dartmouth. Apparently, Stephen was a resident of Dartmouth by Jan. 1701/2, as the birth of Richard is recorded in the vital records of this town.

Likely, both Stephen and Hannah were illiterate: the 1691 deed was signed with "marks". Brother Thomas managed a signature on this document,." Source Image. Citation Image.

2Mosher, Hugh and Rebecca Maxson, Descendants of, https://www.familysearch.org/photos/artifacts/105062816?cid=mem_copy. Image.

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=109803272. "Stephen Cornell (per Ezra Cornell's papers at Cornell University) is the son of Thomas Cornell II, who was the sone of Thomas Cornell--both of Essex, England, later Portsmouth, Rhode Island. He is related to the man that endowed Cornell University.


See also early Cornell ancestors' history.

Courtesy Dave Waz

[He] probably died between 1716 and 1723 in Dartmouth. The following information regarding Stephen is extracted from Rev. John Cornell's "Genealogy of the Cornell Family", New York, 1902. p 37):
1673, Witness at the trial of his father Thomas2.
1686, freeman.
1688, grand juror, Portsmouth.
1716, Stephen and wife Hannah deed homestead to son William, and in 1755 William to son Caleb, deed of the former homestead of his father, Stephen, deceased, in Dartmouth.
1723, John Cornell buys from William Cornell land in Dartmouth."


Wayne Howard Williams

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92080764/wayne-h_-williams. Image.

2United States, GenealogyBank Obituraries, 1980-2014, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QK5X-DJWY. "Daily Oklahoman, The (Oklahoma City, OK) |  5 April 1985
WILLIAMS
Wayne H. age 79, born March 8, 1906, Paden OK, lived most of his life in OKC. A construction worker until his retirement in 1967, he was a Freewill Baptist. Survived by his wife, Ethel of the home; 2 brothers, Dwight (Doc) and Pete Williams, both of Del City; 7 children, Jack & Sherry Williams of OKC, Peggy Buchanan of OKC, Mary & Bill Streetman of OKC, Carolyn & Kenneth Williams of MWC, Gary & Brenda Williams of MWC, Zelda & Bill Ensey of OKC, Lanelda & Ferris Thomas of OKC; 20 grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren; also mother-in-law, Mae Warren of Del City. He was loved by all. Services will be 2pm Friday at Hunter Memory Chapel, burial in Sunny Lane Cemetery. Arrangements by Hunter Funeral Home." Image.


Ethel Lorene Stotts

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14260360. "
Ethel Lorene Stotts Williams
BIRTH 16 Aug 1918
DEATH 9 May 2006 (aged 87)
BURIAL
Sunny Lane Cemetery
Del City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, USA
MEMORIAL ID 14260360 · View Source

MEMORIAL
PHOTOS 1
FLOWERS 0
Ethel Lorene Williams was born Aug 16, 1918 and died May 9, 2006. She was born in Okemah, Ok to John D. and Bertha (Shillings) Stotts. She married Wayne H. Williams in 1936 and had 7 children. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Wayne daughter Zelda Ensey, brothers Calvin, Dervard, Henry and Benny Stotts, also grandchildren Shannon Ensey, Glen Coley, Todd Williams, great grand daughter Tara Williams and Great grandson Andrew Williams, Sister Pat Barlean and son in law Kenneth Williams. Survivors include Jack and Sherry Williams, Peggy Buchanan & Jack Hobbs, Mary & Herman Sutton, Carolyn Williams, LaNelda Thomas, Gary & Brenda Williams and son in law Billy Ensey, also 19 grand children and 31 great grand children and 5 great-great-grandchildren. Her sisters Doris and Williard White, Ola and Tom Lee, Virginia & Richard, Bernard Barlean, Pete and Lois Williams. Many nieces, nephews and lifelong friends. Jessie Molder and Lou Morgan also survive her. She was also known as grandma to Jeff Lupp. Our special thanks to Heartland Hospice especially nurse Lydia, Vickie, Pete, Donnell and Phyllis, they are special people to our family for the love and care given to mom. Also thanks to ManorCare of Midwest City. In Jan. 2005 Gary and Brenda moved her to their home in Midwest City. With the love and best of care they gave her, she lived 17 months in comfort and lots of love. Sherry Hayt was a special helper and loving granddaughter. Services will be held at Sunny Lane Funeral Home Chapel at 2:00 pm Friday May 12, 2006. Burial to follow at Sunny Lane Cemetery." Image.


Rev. Charles Thomas Wages

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20947643. Image.


Ama Cowan

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=20946973. Image.


Roy Ray Cowan

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=30657922. Image.


Juanita Patton

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=62091207. "Daughter of David F Patton and Elizabeth Prater Patton. Wife of Roy Ray Cowan." Image.


Roy Ray Cowan

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=30657922. Image.


Gertha Mae Linton

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=32136165. Image.