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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Governor Thomas McKean

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Pages 13-15. "
1. THOMAS McKEAN.
THE subject of this biography1 was the son of William McKean and Letitia Finney, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He
was born in New London township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, March 19, 1734, old style. After an elementary instruction in reading, writing and arithmetic, Thomas and his elder brother Robert were, at the ages of nine and eleven years respectively, placed under the tuition of the Rev. Francis Allison, D. D., a man of character and reputation.

STUDIES LAW.
  After passing through the regular course of instruction here, and acquiring a knowledge of the practical branches of mathematics, rhetoric, logic, and moral philosophy, Thomas went to Newcastle in Delaware, and entered the office of his relative David Finney, as a law student Some months after, he engaged as clerk to the prothonatory of the Court of Common Pleas; a situation which enabled him to learn the practice while he was studying the theory of the law.
  So great was the reputation that Mr. McKean acquired in his youth by his industry and talents, that before he had attained the age of twenty-one years, he was admitted (1754, J. Hill Martin, Bench and Bar of Philadelphia, 1883, and Penn. Mag.,v., 489.) as an attorney at law in the Courts of Common Pleas for the counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, and also in the Supreme Court. Before the expiration of a year he obtained a considerable share of business, and in May, 1855,1 was admitted to practice in the courts of his native county of Chester. He was
also admitted to the courts of the city and county of Philadelphia.

In 1756, the Attorney-general, who resided in Philadelphia, appointed him, not only without any solicitation,
but without any previous knowledge on his part, his deputy, to prosecute the pleas of the crown in the county of Sussex. He resigned this office after performing its duties for two years with judgment and ability. In 1758, 2 April 17, he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the province of Pennsylvania. The envy which the success of the young lawyer occasioned among his professional brethren, merely served as an additional spur to his industry, and increased his assiduity in the pursuit of legal knowledge ; for though he had become the eloquent advocate and able lawyer, he was still the close and industrious student.3 He afterwards went to England and studied at the Middle Temple, being admitted there May 9,1758.*
  As a recreation from his studies, in 1757, December 28, Mr, McKean enrolled himself with about one hundred and twenty five others in " Richard Williams' company of foot, whereof William Armstrong is colonel, in Newcastle county."5 In the same year he was elected clerk of the House of Assembly, an honor of which he was unapprised until he received information of his appointment from Benjamin Chew, at that time speaker. The following year he was again elected ; but after serving that term he declined further appointment. ' In 1762, he was selected by the legislature, together with Cagsar Rodney, to revise and print the laws passed subsequent to 1752 ; a duty which they speedily and satisfactorily executed.

THE ASSEMBLY OF DELAWARE.
  In the same year Mr. McKean first embarked in the stormy sea of politics, which he continued to brave for nearly half a century. In October, 1762, he was elected a member of the Assembly from the county of Newcastle, and was annually returned for seventeen successive years. So much attached to him were the people of that county, that they continued to elect him, although for the last six years of this time he was residing in Philadelphia. He still however retained his house in Newcastle, probably because his business frequently called him to that city. Finally, on the 1st of October, 1779, on the day of the general election in Delaware, he attended at Newcastle, and in an address to his constituents, declined the honor of further re-election. He was then waited upon by six gentlemen in the name of the electors, who asked him to name seven persons suitable for representatives. He replied that he knew not only seven, but seventy, whom he considered worthy of their votes : but the request being repeated, he acceded and wrote down seven names. The election resulted in the choice of the seven gentlemen whom he had named."
A thorough review of the service by Thomas McKean is reviewed in this text. It provides great insight into the political atmosphere that existed in the establishment of the United States of America. Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2676. Image.

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Page 15. "
  On Thursday the twenty-first of July, 1763, Mr. McKean was married to Miss Mary Borden, eldest child of Col. Joseph Borden, of Bordentown, New Jersey. She and her sister Ann, who married Francis Hopkinson, were said to be two of the most beautiful ladies in New Jersey." Image.


Mary "Maria" Borden

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., page 17. "
i. Mary, b. July 21, 1744, married July 21, 1763, Thomas McKean, Signer of the Declaration of Independence." Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=50832457. Image.

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Page 15. "
  On Thursday the twenty-first of July, 1763, Mr. McKean was married to Miss Mary Borden, eldest child of Col. Joseph Borden, of Bordentown, New Jersey. She and her sister Ann, who married Francis Hopkinson, were said to be two of the most beautiful ladies in New Jersey." Image.


Judge Joseph Borden Jr.

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Colonel Joseph Borden, born August 1, 1719, was a patriot of the Revolution.  He was a member of the Stamp Act Congress of 1765; a member of the first New Jersey Convention at New Brunswick, July 2, 1774; on of the Committee of Observation of Burlington county, February, 1773; entered the army as Colonel of the 1st New Jersey Regiment, and became Colonel and Quartermaster of the State troops; Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, September 11, 1776; reappointed September 28, 1781. He was a man of note in his locality, and during the war his fine house was burned by the British (Penn. Mag., ix., 435). He was married September 22, 1743, to Elizabeth Rogers (From Robert McKean's family bible, in possession of Mrs. Ann McKean Kerr, which is verified by the will of Mrs. Rogers, recorded at Mt. Holly, N.J.; in which she mentions her brother, Isaac Rogers. e.M. Woodward, in the Hist. Burlington and Mercer Co.'s is wrong in stating that this Joseph Borden married a daughter of Marmaduke Watson. He also states wrongly the first of the family, Benjamin instead of Richard.), who was born at Allentown, July 10, 1725; (daughter of Samuel and Mary Rogers. An old pedigree on a modern sheet of legal foolscap, found between the leaves of the old Borden Record above quoted, states that Samuel Rogers was born 1692, died April 14, 1738, and verifies the dates of the daughter's birth and death here given from other sources.) Mrs. Borden died Novembeer 2, 1807. Judge Borden died April 8, 1791. His will is recorded at Trenton, N.J. His issue:

i. Mary, b. July 21, 1744, married July 21, 1763, Thomas McKean, Signer of the Declaration of Independence.
ii. Ann, b. Jan. 24, 1745-6, d. Jun 9, 1746.
iii. Ann, b. May 9, 1747, married Sept. 1, 1768, Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, and left issue.
iv. Amy, b. Oct. 30, 1749; d. Aug. 31, 1751.
v. Laetitia, b. July 29, 1751; d. June 30, 1753 N.S.
vi. Joseph, b. June 23, 1755; m. Nov 26, 1778, Mary Biles, daughter of Langhorn Biles, and d. Oct. 16, 1788, leaving one child, Elizabeth, b. Nov. 13, 1779." Image.

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 100-102, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "     Joseph Borden was 30 years of age when his father commenced the settlement of Bordentown, and this was done to facilitate the design of his son to establish a new line for the transportation of the mails, merchandise and passengers between Philadelphia and New York. His new house and store house were ereoted in 1752, and occupied and
open for the accommodation of passengers early in 1753. In evidence of this fact I will here make an extract from the journal of Conrad Weisier, a noted interpreter of several Indian languages, who resided at Heidelburgh, in Berks county, Pennsylvania,, and traveled this route in 1753 on a mission from the Governor of Pennsylvania to the
Mohawk Indians. He says: "I waited on His Honour, the Governor, at Philadelphia, July 26. On the 28th I took the stage boat from Bordentown and arrived in New York on the first of August." The stage boat from Philadelphia usually arrived at Bordentown in the afternoon, and the passengers the next morning were forwarded in stage coaches or covered wagons to some intermediate station, where they spent another night, and they arrived the following day at Amboy or Elizabethtown, where they remained another night, and the next day they arrived in New York by another stage boat, wind and weather permitting.
    It appears from this quotation from Mr. Weiser's journal that Mr. Borden was fully established in the transport business in 1753. But he did not lack competitors. The old line through Trentoa became alarmed at his success, and made great efforts to surpass him, both in speed and in the accomodation of their passengers. They built a new style of carriage which they called "flying machines" and set up flaming advertisements all over the country, promising to take passengers from city to city in three days. But, unfortunately for the pubUc, all their extra speed laid in the brains of him who wrote the advertisements. It still required from four to five days for a person to go from New York to Philadelphia,. In connection with the transportation of the mails, which had greatly increased in weight and bulk, Mr. Borden went to England to confer with the Postmaster-General on the subject, the colonial agent of the government in New York not having any authority to increase the compensation for this service. During his stay in England, it was reported that he visited Borden, the ancient home of his ancestors, but no account of what he saw and heard relating to the family connections has been preserved.

    The next subject connected with the Colonel's historv occurred in 1765, when he was chosen with two others to represent the state of New Jersey in the general convention of the colonies, or Congress, which met in New York October, 1765.
    The convention met at the time appointed, organized and proceeded without delay to a full discussion of matters connected with the relation of the colonies with the government of Great Britain. They enumerated the grievances felt in each of the colonies. They asserted and unanimously agreed upon the rights of their constituents, as subjects under the government, and closed their labors by adopting an address to His Majesty, the King, a petition to the House of Lords in Parliament, and another to the House of Commons. In these documents
they had plainly set forth their views of the legal power of the government over the colonies and the rights of the people in America.
    They were Englishmen, and as such were entitled to be represented in Parliament, and to all other privileges of citizenship, of which they were deprived. Having accomplished the objects for which they had been called together, the convention was dissolved October 24, 1765.
    Elliot, in his Debates in Congress, p. 326, says of this convention: "We must never forget that the egg- of this republic was the Congress which met in New York in 1765." Of the thirteen colonies, nine only were represented, viz: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and South Carolina. Elliot says again: "This convention of sages was the parent plant of our present confederacy of republics." Only two of its members refused to sig-n the petitions, Mr. Ogden of New Jersey, and Mr. Ruggles of Massachusetts. They contended that each colony should petition separately. Mr. Borden and his colleagues on presenting their report to the assembly, received a vote of thanks from them for the judicious, able and faithful discharge of their duty to
the state on this important occasion."
     As time rolled on, the disposition of the British government to oppress and enslave the colonies became more apparent: and they began to realize the fact that resistance to these encroachments upon their rights and pivileges must be made or they would be lost forever.
   Consequently, in 1774, each colony acting on its own responsibility, appointed a committee of correspondence, whose duty it was to communicate with the committee of other colonies on all subjects connected with the alarming  state of the country's affairs. This arrangement produced an excellent effect on each of the colonies. Each of
them being equally exposed to the desolating power of England, sympathized more intensely with those colonies on which this power had fallen, and stimulated them to make the greater exertions to support and encourage them in resisting. And when the first blow fell upon Boston, the sound reverbrated along the Alleghanies, until it aroused
the attention of every dweller on American soil. The committee of correspondence for New Jersey consisted of nine persons, one of whom was Col. Joseph Borden. The following year, 1775 he  with nine others, were chosen to form a council of war, on which he acted, during the war with untiring zeal and unflinching energy, whether in the council or in the field. He and his son were both attached to the troops of the New Jersey line, and were in most of the battles fought in that state. Indeed, so great was the influence of Col. Borden with the army and the people both, and so untiring in his efforts to oppose the British army and uphold the cause of his own country, that he was soon selected by the British commander as a mark for his special vengeance.
     He was determined either to detach him from the service of his country ot ruin him by the destruction of hi& property. Lord Cornwallis was then encamped on the Delaware, near Bordentown, and established his headciuarters at the house of Col. Borden, his wife and daughter being all of the family at home; the Colonel and his son being with the American army at the time. This great English general abused his position by commencing his attack on Col. Borden by assailing his good lady. As this attack and its results have been graphically described by Mrs. Ellet in her work entitled "The Woonen of the American Revolution," at pages 305 and 306, of ihe second
volume, I will insert here an extract from her excellent work relating to this subiect:
    "At the time when New Jersey was overrun by the enemy and when the prospects of the colonies were darkest, an officer stationed at Bordentown, N. J., said by Maj. Gordon to be Lord Cornwallis, endeavored to persuade and then to intimidate the wife of the Hon. Joseph Borden of that place to use her influence with her husband and son to abandon the American cause. They were both absent in the Continental army, at the time she was visited at her residence for that purpose. The officer promised her that if she would induce them to quit the standard of their country that they followed and join the Royalists, that her husband's property should be protected, while in
case of refusal, their estate would be destroyeil and their elegant mansion burned to the ground. Mrs. Borden answered by bidding him defiance, saying: 'The sight of my house in flames would be a treat to me: for since you; have been here I have seen enough to know that you never injure that which you have power to keep and enjoy. The
application of a torch to my dwelling I should regard as a signal for your departure.' The house was burned in fulfillment of tlie threat, the property laid waste, the animals slaughtered or driven off, but, as the owner predicted, the retreat of the spoiler quickly followed."
    "This truly noble woman was one of the most active patriots of the Revolution. She was willing to see her property sacrificed, and the lives of her gallant husband and son exposed to the dangers of battle for the good of her country; and when called upon to make personal efforta for the glorious object, which she was often called upon to do, she met the crisis with heroic firmness and exerted herself to the uttermost to urge forward the good cause. Her character and personal influence were highly appreciated by all who knew her personally, or had heard of her name." And when the ladies of New Jersey met at Trenton on July 4. 17S0, and chose Mrs. Col. Joseph Borden
as their agent to collect funds for the Continental army - it was no unmeaning compliment, but their choice was the result of a just appreciation of her noble character, influence and patriotism. Such an exhibition of the character and spirit of Mrs. Borden as Mrs. Ellet has given very naturally excites a strong desire to know more of her history and that of her family. But at present the subject is involved in much obscurity, both as regards Col. Borden and his lady. If Mrs. Ellet had been acquainted with more of her histov^ she would probably have given it." S."

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=116398095. Image.

4Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Page 16. "
Colonel Joseph Borden, was married September 22, 1743, to Elizabeth Rogers (From Robert McKean's family bible, in possession of Mrs. Ann McKean Kerr, which is verified by the will of Mrs. Rogers, recorded at Mt. Holly, N.J.; in which she mentions her brother, Isaac Rogers. She was born at Allentown, July 10, 1725; (daughter of Samuel and Mary Rogers. An old pedigree on a modern sheet of legal foolscap, found between the leaves of the old Borden Record above quoted, states that Samuel Rogers was born 1692, died April 14, 1738, and verifies the dates of the daughter's birth and death here given from other sources.)." Image.

5Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., pg 99. "182. JOSEPH, born August 1, 1719; died April 8, 1791. "He married Elizabeth Rogers, who was born July 10, 1725; died November 2, 1807, having outlived her husband sixteen years, seven months and twenty four days. She was a woman of great ability and fine Christian character. Her will was dated September 15, 1798, and proved November 5, 1807. Among her legatees were her daughter, Ann Hopkinson, and her three daughters, Elizabeth, "daughter of my brother Isaac Rogers, lately deceased." Lastly her grandson, Joseoh Hookinson, who had the use and occupancy of the old brick family mansion, which ie still retained by his descendants. It is from this will that I have obtained the maiden name of Mrs. Borden. Mary Rogers was buried in the same tier of graves with the Bordens and Hopkinsons, and may have been a sister of Isaac and Elizabeth. She was buried in the ground now known as the Hopkinson Cemetery, at the western terminus of Church street, on the bank of the Delaware River. Here lie in the same tier of graves on the north side, Joseoh Borden, Sr., on his right Col. Joseph Borden and his wife Elizabeth, Joseph Hopkinson and his wife Emily; on his left hand are Joseph Borden, Jr., died October 16, 1788, in his 33d year, and Ann Borden, died March 11, 1744. These last probably were near relatives to the family."


Elizabeth Rogers

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Colonel Joseph Borden, was married September 22, 1743, to Elizabeth Rogers (From Robert McKean's family bible, in possession of Mrs. Ann McKean Kerr, which is verified by the will of Mrs. Rogers, recorded at Mt. Holly, N.J.; in which she mentions her brother, Isaac Rogers. She was born at Allentown, July 10, 1725; (daughter of Samuel and Mary Rogers. An old pedigree on a modern sheet of legal foolscap, found between the leaves of the old Borden Record above quoted, states that Samuel Rogers was born 1692, died April 14, 1738, and verifies the dates of the daughter's birth and death here given from other sources.)." Image.

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 99, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "182. JOSEPH, born August 1, 1719; died April 8, 1791. "He married Elizabeth Rogers, who was born July 10, 1725; died November 2, 1807, having outlived her husband sixteen years, seven months and twenty four days. She was a woman of great ability and fine Christian character. Her will was dated September 15, 1798, and proved November 5, 1807. Among her legatees were her daughter, Ann Hopkinson, and her three daughters, Elizabeth, "daughter of my brother Isaac Rogers, lately deceased." Lastly her grandson, Joseoh Hookinson, who had the use and occupancy of the old brick family mansion, which ie still retained by his descendants. It is from this will that I have obtained the maiden name of Mrs. Borden. Mary Rogers was buried in the same tier of graves with the Bordens and Hopkinsons, and may have been a sister of Isaac and Elizabeth. She was buried in the ground now known as the Hopkinson Cemetery, at the western terminus of Church street, on the bank of the Delaware River. Here lie in the same tier of graves on the north side, Joseoh Borden, Sr., on his right Col. Joseph Borden and his wife Elizabeth, Joseph Hopkinson and his wife Emily; on his left hand are Joseph Borden, Jr., died October 16, 1788, in his 33d year, and Ann Borden, died March 11, 1744. These last probably were near relatives to the family."

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Page 16. "
Colonel Joseph Borden, born August 1, 1719, was a patriot of the Revolution.  He was a member of the Stamp Act Congress of 1765; a member of the first New Jersey Convention at New Brunswick, July 2, 1774; on of the Committee of Observation of Burlington county, February, 1773; entered the army as Colonel of the 1st New Jersey Regiment, and became Colonel and Quartermaster of the State troops; Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, September 11, 1776; reappointed September 28, 1781. He was a man of note in his locality, and during the war his fine house was burned by the British (Penn. Mag., ix., 435). He was married September 22, 1743, to Elizabeth Rogers (From Robert McKean's family bible, in possession of Mrs. Ann McKean Kerr, which is verified by the will of Mrs. Rogers, recorded at Mt. Holly, N.J.; in which she mentions her brother, Isaac Rogers. e.M. Woodward, in the Hist. Burlington and Mercer Co.'s is wrong in stating that this Joseph Borden married a daughter of Marmaduke Watson. He also states wrongly the first of the family, Benjamin instead of Richard.), who was born at Allentown, July 10, 1725; (daughter of Samuel and Mary Rogers. An old pedigree on a modern sheet of legal foolscap, found between the leaves of the old Borden Record above quoted, states that Samuel Rogers was born 1692, died April 14, 1738, and verifies the dates of the daughter's birth and death here given from other sources.) Mrs. Borden died Novembeer 2, 1807. Judge Borden died April 8, 1791. His will is recorded at Trenton, N.J. His issue:

i. Mary, b. July 21, 1744, married July 21, 1763, Thomas McKean, Signer of the Declaration of Independence.
ii. Ann, b. Jan. 24, 1745-6, d. Jun 9, 1746.
iii. Ann, b. May 9, 1747, married Sept. 1, 1768, Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, and left issue.
iv. Amy, b. Oct. 30, 1749; d. Aug. 31, 1751.
v. Laetitia, b. July 29, 1751; d. June 30, 1753 N.S.
vi. Joseph, b. June 23, 1755; m. Nov 26, 1778, Mary Biles, daughter of Langhorn Biles, and d. Oct. 16, 1788, leaving one child, Elizabeth, b. Nov. 13, 1779." Image.

4Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., page 100-102. "     Joseph Borden was 30 years of age when his father commenced the settlement of Bordentown, and this was done to facilitate the design of his son to establish a new line for the transportation of the mails, merchandise and passengers between Philadelphia and New York. His new house and store house were ereoted in 1752, and occupied and
open for the accommodation of passengers early in 1753. In evidence of this fact I will here make an extract from the journal of Conrad Weisier, a noted interpreter of several Indian languages, who resided at Heidelburgh, in Berks county, Pennsylvania,, and traveled this route in 1753 on a mission from the Governor of Pennsylvania to the
Mohawk Indians. He says: "I waited on His Honour, the Governor, at Philadelphia, July 26. On the 28th I took the stage boat from Bordentown and arrived in New York on the first of August." The stage boat from Philadelphia usually arrived at Bordentown in the afternoon, and the passengers the next morning were forwarded in stage coaches or covered wagons to some intermediate station, where they spent another night, and they arrived the following day at Amboy or Elizabethtown, where they remained another night, and the next day they arrived in New York by another stage boat, wind and weather permitting.
    It appears from this quotation from Mr. Weiser's journal that Mr. Borden was fully established in the transport business in 1753. But he did not lack competitors. The old line through Trentoa became alarmed at his success, and made great efforts to surpass him, both in speed and in the accomodation of their passengers. They built a new style of carriage which they called "flying machines" and set up flaming advertisements all over the country, promising to take passengers from city to city in three days. But, unfortunately for the pubUc, all their extra speed laid in the brains of him who wrote the advertisements. It still required from four to five days for a person to go from New York to Philadelphia,. In connection with the transportation of the mails, which had greatly increased in weight and bulk, Mr. Borden went to England to confer with the Postmaster-General on the subject, the colonial agent of the government in New York not having any authority to increase the compensation for this service. During his stay in England, it was reported that he visited Borden, the ancient home of his ancestors, but no account of what he saw and heard relating to the family connections has been preserved.

    The next subject connected with the Colonel's historv occurred in 1765, when he was chosen with two others to represent the state of New Jersey in the general convention of the colonies, or Congress, which met in New York October, 1765.
    The convention met at the time appointed, organized and proceeded without delay to a full discussion of matters connected with the relation of the colonies with the government of Great Britain. They enumerated the grievances felt in each of the colonies. They asserted and unanimously agreed upon the rights of their constituents, as subjects under the government, and closed their labors by adopting an address to His Majesty, the King, a petition to the House of Lords in Parliament, and another to the House of Commons. In these documents
they had plainly set forth their views of the legal power of the government over the colonies and the rights of the people in America.
    They were Englishmen, and as such were entitled to be represented in Parliament, and to all other privileges of citizenship, of which they were deprived. Having accomplished the objects for which they had been called together, the convention was dissolved October 24, 1765.
    Elliot, in his Debates in Congress, p. 326, says of this convention: "We must never forget that the egg- of this republic was the Congress which met in New York in 1765." Of the thirteen colonies, nine only were represented, viz: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and South Carolina. Elliot says again: "This convention of sages was the parent plant of our present confederacy of republics." Only two of its members refused to sig-n the petitions, Mr. Ogden of New Jersey, and Mr. Ruggles of Massachusetts. They contended that each colony should petition separately. Mr. Borden and his colleagues on presenting their report to the assembly, received a vote of thanks from them for the judicious, able and faithful discharge of their duty to
the state on this important occasion."
     As time rolled on, the disposition of the British government to oppress and enslave the colonies became more apparent: and they began to realize the fact that resistance to these encroachments upon their rights and pivileges must be made or they would be lost forever.
   Consequently, in 1774, each colony acting on its own responsibility, appointed a committee of correspondence, whose duty it was to communicate with the committee of other colonies on all subjects connected with the alarming  state of the country's affairs. This arrangement produced an excellent effect on each of the colonies. Each of
them being equally exposed to the desolating power of England, sympathized more intensely with those colonies on which this power had fallen, and stimulated them to make the greater exertions to support and encourage them in resisting. And when the first blow fell upon Boston, the sound reverbrated along the Alleghanies, until it aroused
the attention of every dweller on American soil. The committee of correspondence for New Jersey consisted of nine persons, one of whom was Col. Joseph Borden. The following year, 1775 he  with nine others, were chosen to form a council of war, on which he acted, during the war with untiring zeal and unflinching energy, whether in the council or in the field. He and his son were both attached to the troops of the New Jersey line, and were in most of the battles fought in that state. Indeed, so great was the influence of Col. Borden with the army and the people both, and so untiring in his efforts to oppose the British army and uphold the cause of his own country, that he was soon selected by the British commander as a mark for his special vengeance.
     He was determined either to detach him from the service of his country ot ruin him by the destruction of hi& property. Lord Cornwallis was then encamped on the Delaware, near Bordentown, and established his headciuarters at the house of Col. Borden, his wife and daughter being all of the family at home; the Colonel and his son being with the American army at the time. This great English general abused his position by commencing his attack on Col. Borden by assailing his good lady. As this attack and its results have been graphically described by Mrs. Ellet in her work entitled "The Woonen of the American Revolution," at pages 305 and 306, of ihe second
volume, I will insert here an extract from her excellent work relating to this subiect:
    "At the time when New Jersey was overrun by the enemy and when the prospects of the colonies were darkest, an officer stationed at Bordentown, N. J., said by Maj. Gordon to be Lord Cornwallis, endeavored to persuade and then to intimidate the wife of the Hon. Joseph Borden of that place to use her influence with her husband and son to abandon the American cause. They were both absent in the Continental army, at the time she was visited at her residence for that purpose. The officer promised her that if she would induce them to quit the standard of their country that they followed and join the Royalists, that her husband's property should be protected, while in
case of refusal, their estate would be destroyeil and their elegant mansion burned to the ground. Mrs. Borden answered by bidding him defiance, saying: 'The sight of my house in flames would be a treat to me: for since you; have been here I have seen enough to know that you never injure that which you have power to keep and enjoy. The
application of a torch to my dwelling I should regard as a signal for your departure.' The house was burned in fulfillment of tlie threat, the property laid waste, the animals slaughtered or driven off, but, as the owner predicted, the retreat of the spoiler quickly followed."
    "This truly noble woman was one of the most active patriots of the Revolution. She was willing to see her property sacrificed, and the lives of her gallant husband and son exposed to the dangers of battle for the good of her country; and when called upon to make personal efforta for the glorious object, which she was often called upon to do, she met the crisis with heroic firmness and exerted herself to the uttermost to urge forward the good cause. Her character and personal influence were highly appreciated by all who knew her personally, or had heard of her name." And when the ladies of New Jersey met at Trenton on July 4. 17S0, and chose Mrs. Col. Joseph Borden
as their agent to collect funds for the Continental army - it was no unmeaning compliment, but their choice was the result of a just appreciation of her noble character, influence and patriotism. Such an exhibition of the character and spirit of Mrs. Borden as Mrs. Ellet has given very naturally excites a strong desire to know more of her history and that of her family. But at present the subject is involved in much obscurity, both as regards Col. Borden and his lady. If Mrs. Ellet had been acquainted with more of her histov^ she would probably have given it." S."


Ann Borden

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., page 17. "
ii. Ann, b. Jan. 24, 1745-6, d. Jun 9, 1746." Image.


Amy Borden

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., page 17. "
iv. Amy, b. Oct. 30, 1749; d. Aug. 31, 1751." Image.


Letitia Borden

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., page 17. "
v. Laetitia, b. July 29, 1751; d. June 30, 1753 N.S." Source Image. Citation Image.


Judge Francis Hopkinson

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 131, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "340. ANN; date of her birth unknown. "She married Judge Francis Hopkinson. He was born in Philadelphia in 1737, and his death occurred in 1791. His parents emigrated from England, and his father was an intimate friend of Benjamin Franklin, and he is said to have been the first person to whom Franklin exhibited the experiment of silently drawing the electric fluid from the clouds by a pointed, instead of a blunt instrument. Francis was the first student that entered the College of Philadelphia after its organization, and completed his course there. After graduating he studied law and in 1765 he visited England, where he remained two years. On his return home he fixed his residence at Bordentown, having married Miss Ann Borden, the only daughter of the Hon. Joseph Borden. At the first breaking out
of the Revolution Mr. Borden and Mr. Hopkinson both took strong ground in favor of the liberties of the colonies, and devoted all their energies to the advancement of the good cause. In 1776 Judge Hopkins was delegated to the Continental Congress, which met in Philadelphia, and on the 4th of July they declared these colonies to be free
and independent states, and affixed their names to this celebrated declaration. What he had thus avowed in connection with this, he labored to sustain by the power of his pen. He was, by nature, a man of a versatile genius, and by his education he became a man of varied accomplishments. To the knowledge of the law he added those of painting, poetry and music, and was considered quite proficient in them all. He commenced his warfare upon British rule as early as
1774, by the publication of several pamphlets designed !o awaken the attention of the community to their true condition, and to arouse them to stand forth in defence of their rights. Among others were the following satrical compositions, as "The Admirable Political Catechism," "Letters of Tories and British Travelers," "Answers to British Proclamations," etc., and so well did he sustain his position throughout the war that a writer remarks of him that "during the Revolution he distinguished himself by satrical and political writings which attained such popularity that it has been truly said that few persons effected more than Hopkinson in educating the American people for political independence." He also exercised his raillery in prose and verse at most of the socal follies of his time. In 1779 he was made judge of the Admiralty Court for Pennsylvania, which office he held for ten years, until the organization of the Federal government, when his commission, expired. As soon, however, as Gen. "Washington entered upon the duties of his offlce as President of the United States, he addressed to Judge Hopkinson a highly complimentary letter, enclosing a commission of United States District Judge for Pennsylvania, a position he
held during life.

Judge Hopkinson left one son, Joseph Hopkinson, and three daughters, Elizabeth, who married a Petit; Mary Letitia, married a Buchanan, and Ann married a Buchanan. They were all named in their grandmother's will, dated September 15, 1798, and proved November 5, 1807. Francis Hopkinson and wife both died and were interred at Philadelphia." S."


Nancy Ann Borden

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p. "
iii. Ann, b. May 9, 1747, married Sept. 1, 1768, Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, and left issue." Image.

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 131, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "340. ANN; date of her birth unknown. "She married Judge Francis Hopkinson. He was born in Philadelphia in 1737, and his death occurred in 1791. His parents emigrated from England, and his father was an intimate friend of Benjamin Franklin, and he is said to have been the first person to whom Franklin exhibited the experiment of silently drawing the electric fluid from the clouds by a pointed, instead of a blunt instrument. Francis was the first student that entered the College of Philadelphia after its organization, and completed his course there. After graduating he studied law and in 1765 he visited England, where he remained two years. On his return home he fixed his residence at Bordentown, having married Miss Ann Borden, the only daughter of the Hon. Joseph Borden. At the first breaking out
of the Revolution Mr. Borden and Mr. Hopkinson both took strong ground in favor of the liberties of the colonies, and devoted all their energies to the advancement of the good cause. In 1776 Judge Hopkins was delegated to the Continental Congress, which met in Philadelphia, and on the 4th of July they declared these colonies to be free
and independent states, and affixed their names to this celebrated declaration. What he had thus avowed in connection with this, he labored to sustain by the power of his pen. He was, by nature, a man of a versatile genius, and by his education he became a man of varied accomplishments. To the knowledge of the law he added those of painting, poetry and music, and was considered quite proficient in them all. He commenced his warfare upon British rule as early as
1774, by the publication of several pamphlets designed !o awaken the attention of the community to their true condition, and to arouse them to stand forth in defence of their rights. Among others were the following satrical compositions, as "The Admirable Political Catechism," "Letters of Tories and British Travelers," "Answers to British Proclamations," etc., and so well did he sustain his position throughout the war that a writer remarks of him that "during the Revolution he distinguished himself by satrical and political writings which attained such popularity that it has been truly said that few persons effected more than Hopkinson in educating the American people for political independence." He also exercised his raillery in prose and verse at most of the socal follies of his time. In 1779 he was made judge of the Admiralty Court for Pennsylvania, which office he held for ten years, until the organization of the Federal government, when his commission, expired. As soon, however, as Gen. "Washington entered upon the duties of his offlce as President of the United States, he addressed to Judge Hopkinson a highly complimentary letter, enclosing a commission of United States District Judge for Pennsylvania, a position he
held during life.

Judge Hopkinson left one son, Joseph Hopkinson, and three daughters, Elizabeth, who married a Petit; Mary Letitia, married a Buchanan, and Ann married a Buchanan. They were all named in their grandmother's will, dated September 15, 1798, and proved November 5, 1807. Francis Hopkinson and wife both died and were interred at Philadelphia." S."


Joseph Hopkinson

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 132, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "Joseph, was one of the ablest lawyers of his time, and was the author of 'Hail Columbia.' Speaking of 'Hail Columbia," the music of this song was at first known as the 'President's March,' and it used to be played while "Washington was President by an orchestra as he came into the theatre. Its music was composed by a fellow named Phyles, and it was played for the first time on Trenton Bridge as Washington rode over it on his way to be inaugurated. It became popular at once, and Hopkinson wrote and adopted these lines to it, beginning 'Hail Columbia.' During the political campaign, while John Qaiincy Adams was President, the name 'President's March' was dropped, and it has since been known as 'Hail Columbia.' "."


Joseph Borden III

1Pennsylvania, Philadelphia USA (Extracted records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), FHL Number 1490578, 1773/1781. Father of Elizabeth BORDEN in Christening Extract.

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 133, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "341. JOSEPH, born 1755; died October 16, 1788. He married Elizabeth Biles, daughter of Langhorn Biles of Bucks county, Penn. He was a gallant officer in the war of the Revolution, and commanded a troop at light horse of Burlington county. He was wounded by a musket ball at the battle of Germantown, while acting as aide-de-camp to Gen.
Forman. He never fully recovered from the effect of the wound, and died October 16, 1788, at the age of 33. His wife was daughter of Langhorn Biles, of Bucks county, Penn., and was one of the matrons who assisted at Washington's reception by the people of New Jersey in 1789, as did also his only daughter Elizabeth, then a girl 13 years
of age. Elizabeth Borden married Azariah Hunt. Mrs. Borden's mother was a sister of Col. Joseph Kirkbridge of the patriot forces. (Woodward's History of Bordentown)."

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., page 17. "
vi. Joseph, b. June 23, 1755; m. Nov 26, 1778, Mary Biles, daughter of Langhorn Biles, and d. Oct. 16, 1788, leaving one child, Elizabeth, b. Nov. 13, 1779." Image.

4Pennsylvania, Philadelphia USA (Extracted records), FHL Number 1490578, 1773/1781.


Mary Elizabeth Biles

1Pennsylvania, Philadelphia USA (Extracted records) (Vital Records Index - North America, CDs, 1998), FHL Number 1490578, 1773/1781. Mother of Elizabeth BORDEN in Christening Extract.

2Borden-Saltar-Hunt bible. "Bible for sale on E-Bay in Oct 2019.". "Departed this life on the 8th of January 1823 at her residence Spring Hill Farm near Bordentown. Mrs. Mary Borden, in the 63rd year of her age. After a life jaring indisposition of two months which she had with Christian facilitarion and resignation.
It may be truly said of the deceased, that she ws a tender parent, ___ ___ friends, a just, _____ and benevolent woman which endeared her to a large circl of friends and acquaintances." Image.

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., page 17. "
vi. Joseph, b. June 23, 1755; m. Nov 26, 1778, Mary Biles, daughter of Langhorn Biles, and d. Oct. 16, 1788, leaving one child, Elizabeth, b. Nov. 13, 1779." Image.

4Pennsylvania, Philadelphia USA (Extracted records), FHL Number 1490578, 1773/1781.

5Pennsylvania, Philadelphia USA (Extracted records), FHL Number 1490578, 1773/1781. Father of Elizabeth BORDEN in Christening Extract.

6Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], page 133, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "341. JOSEPH, born 1755; died October 16, 1788. He married Elizabeth Biles, daughter of Langhorn Biles of Bucks county, Penn. He was a gallant officer in the war of the Revolution, and commanded a troop at light horse of Burlington county. He was wounded by a musket ball at the battle of Germantown, while acting as aide-de-camp to Gen.
Forman. He never fully recovered from the effect of the wound, and died October 16, 1788, at the age of 33. His wife was daughter of Langhorn Biles, of Bucks county, Penn., and was one of the matrons who assisted at Washington's reception by the people of New Jersey in 1789, as did also his only daughter Elizabeth, then a girl 13 years
of age. Elizabeth Borden married Azariah Hunt. Mrs. Borden's mother was a sister of Col. Joseph Kirkbridge of the patriot forces. (Woodward's History of Bordentown)."


Governor Thomas McKean

1Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Pages 13-15. "
1. THOMAS McKEAN.
THE subject of this biography1 was the son of William McKean and Letitia Finney, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He
was born in New London township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, March 19, 1734, old style. After an elementary instruction in reading, writing and arithmetic, Thomas and his elder brother Robert were, at the ages of nine and eleven years respectively, placed under the tuition of the Rev. Francis Allison, D. D., a man of character and reputation.

STUDIES LAW.
  After passing through the regular course of instruction here, and acquiring a knowledge of the practical branches of mathematics, rhetoric, logic, and moral philosophy, Thomas went to Newcastle in Delaware, and entered the office of his relative David Finney, as a law student Some months after, he engaged as clerk to the prothonatory of the Court of Common Pleas; a situation which enabled him to learn the practice while he was studying the theory of the law.
  So great was the reputation that Mr. McKean acquired in his youth by his industry and talents, that before he had attained the age of twenty-one years, he was admitted (1754, J. Hill Martin, Bench and Bar of Philadelphia, 1883, and Penn. Mag.,v., 489.) as an attorney at law in the Courts of Common Pleas for the counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, and also in the Supreme Court. Before the expiration of a year he obtained a considerable share of business, and in May, 1855,1 was admitted to practice in the courts of his native county of Chester. He was
also admitted to the courts of the city and county of Philadelphia.

In 1756, the Attorney-general, who resided in Philadelphia, appointed him, not only without any solicitation,
but without any previous knowledge on his part, his deputy, to prosecute the pleas of the crown in the county of Sussex. He resigned this office after performing its duties for two years with judgment and ability. In 1758, 2 April 17, he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the province of Pennsylvania. The envy which the success of the young lawyer occasioned among his professional brethren, merely served as an additional spur to his industry, and increased his assiduity in the pursuit of legal knowledge ; for though he had become the eloquent advocate and able lawyer, he was still the close and industrious student.3 He afterwards went to England and studied at the Middle Temple, being admitted there May 9,1758.*
  As a recreation from his studies, in 1757, December 28, Mr, McKean enrolled himself with about one hundred and twenty five others in " Richard Williams' company of foot, whereof William Armstrong is colonel, in Newcastle county."5 In the same year he was elected clerk of the House of Assembly, an honor of which he was unapprised until he received information of his appointment from Benjamin Chew, at that time speaker. The following year he was again elected ; but after serving that term he declined further appointment. ' In 1762, he was selected by the legislature, together with Cagsar Rodney, to revise and print the laws passed subsequent to 1752 ; a duty which they speedily and satisfactorily executed.

THE ASSEMBLY OF DELAWARE.
  In the same year Mr. McKean first embarked in the stormy sea of politics, which he continued to brave for nearly half a century. In October, 1762, he was elected a member of the Assembly from the county of Newcastle, and was annually returned for seventeen successive years. So much attached to him were the people of that county, that they continued to elect him, although for the last six years of this time he was residing in Philadelphia. He still however retained his house in Newcastle, probably because his business frequently called him to that city. Finally, on the 1st of October, 1779, on the day of the general election in Delaware, he attended at Newcastle, and in an address to his constituents, declined the honor of further re-election. He was then waited upon by six gentlemen in the name of the electors, who asked him to name seven persons suitable for representatives. He replied that he knew not only seven, but seventy, whom he considered worthy of their votes : but the request being repeated, he acceded and wrote down seven names. The election resulted in the choice of the seven gentlemen whom he had named."
A thorough review of the service by Thomas McKean is reviewed in this text. It provides great insight into the political atmosphere that existed in the establishment of the United States of America. Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2676. Image.

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Page 21. "
SECOND MARRIAGE.
Mr. McKean met with a serious affliction in the death of his wife, on Friday, the 12th of March, 1773, at half-past eleven o'clock, in the 29ths year of her age, leaving two sons and four daughters, one of the latter being an infant two weeks old. A notice of her death appears in the Pennsylvania Gazette of March 17th. She was buried on the Sunday following, in the burial ground of Immanuel Church, Newcastle. A crayon likeness of Mrs. McKean is in possession
of Mrs. Sarah P. Wilson, of Philadelphia.

Not long after this event, either in the same year or more probably in the following year, Mr. McKean removed his residence to Philadelphia, although he also retained his house in Newcastle.

On Saturday, September 3d, 1774,5 Mr. McKean was married a second time, to Miss Sarah Armitage, of Newcastle. They were married by the Rev. Joseph Montgomery,6 who was, as I have ascertained, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church at Newcastle, from 1765 to 1777. No records of that church are now in existence prior to 1842." Image.

4Delaware, Marriage Records, 1744-1912. "
McKean, Thomas, Esq. to Sarah Armitage of New Castle, on last Saturday evening, at New Castle. (Pennsylvania Journal & Weekly Advt. Sept. 7. 1774)."


Sarah Armitage

1U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935, Ancestry.com. "
Swarthmore College; Swarthmore, Pennsylvania; Births, Burials and Marriage Certificates, 1720-1801; Collection: Quaker Meeting Records; Call Number: MR Ph 47

Name: Sarah Armitage
Birth Date: 19 Jun 1756
Birth Date on Image: 19 Sixth 1756
Birth Place: Bucks, Pennsylvania
Father: Samuel Armitage
Mother: Elisabeth Armitage
Event Type: Birth
Monthly Meeting: Buckingham Monthly Meeting
Historical Meeting Data: Search for this monthly meeting in the 'Quaker Monthly Meetings Index'
Yearly Meeting: Philadelphia Yearly Meeting
Meeting State: Pennsylvania
Meeting County: Bucks." Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=50899622. Image.

3Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 21. "
SECOND MARRIAGE.
Mr. McKean met with a serious affliction in the death of his wife, on Friday, the 12th of March, 1773, at half-past eleven o'clock, in the 29ths year of her age, leaving two sons and four daughters, one of the latter being an infant two weeks old. A notice of her death appears in the Pennsylvania Gazette of March 17th. She was buried on the Sunday following, in the burial ground of Immanuel Church, Newcastle. A crayon likeness of Mrs. McKean is in possession
of Mrs. Sarah P. Wilson, of Philadelphia.

Not long after this event, either in the same year or more probably in the following year, Mr. McKean removed his residence to Philadelphia, although he also retained his house in Newcastle.

On Saturday, September 3d, 1774,5 Mr. McKean was married a second time, to Miss Sarah Armitage, of Newcastle. They were married by the Rev. Joseph Montgomery,6 who was, as I have ascertained, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church at Newcastle, from 1765 to 1777. No records of that church are now in existence prior to 1842." Image.

4Delaware, Marriage Records, 1744-1912. "
McKean, Thomas, Esq. to Sarah Armitage of New Castle, on last Saturday evening, at New Castle. (Pennsylvania Journal & Weekly Advt. Sept. 7. 1774)."

5Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Pages 13-15. "
1. THOMAS McKEAN.
THE subject of this biography1 was the son of William McKean and Letitia Finney, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He
was born in New London township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, March 19, 1734, old style. After an elementary instruction in reading, writing and arithmetic, Thomas and his elder brother Robert were, at the ages of nine and eleven years respectively, placed under the tuition of the Rev. Francis Allison, D. D., a man of character and reputation.

STUDIES LAW.
  After passing through the regular course of instruction here, and acquiring a knowledge of the practical branches of mathematics, rhetoric, logic, and moral philosophy, Thomas went to Newcastle in Delaware, and entered the office of his relative David Finney, as a law student Some months after, he engaged as clerk to the prothonatory of the Court of Common Pleas; a situation which enabled him to learn the practice while he was studying the theory of the law.
  So great was the reputation that Mr. McKean acquired in his youth by his industry and talents, that before he had attained the age of twenty-one years, he was admitted (1754, J. Hill Martin, Bench and Bar of Philadelphia, 1883, and Penn. Mag.,v., 489.) as an attorney at law in the Courts of Common Pleas for the counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, and also in the Supreme Court. Before the expiration of a year he obtained a considerable share of business, and in May, 1855,1 was admitted to practice in the courts of his native county of Chester. He was
also admitted to the courts of the city and county of Philadelphia.

In 1756, the Attorney-general, who resided in Philadelphia, appointed him, not only without any solicitation,
but without any previous knowledge on his part, his deputy, to prosecute the pleas of the crown in the county of Sussex. He resigned this office after performing its duties for two years with judgment and ability. In 1758, 2 April 17, he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the province of Pennsylvania. The envy which the success of the young lawyer occasioned among his professional brethren, merely served as an additional spur to his industry, and increased his assiduity in the pursuit of legal knowledge ; for though he had become the eloquent advocate and able lawyer, he was still the close and industrious student.3 He afterwards went to England and studied at the Middle Temple, being admitted there May 9,1758.*
  As a recreation from his studies, in 1757, December 28, Mr, McKean enrolled himself with about one hundred and twenty five others in " Richard Williams' company of foot, whereof William Armstrong is colonel, in Newcastle county."5 In the same year he was elected clerk of the House of Assembly, an honor of which he was unapprised until he received information of his appointment from Benjamin Chew, at that time speaker. The following year he was again elected ; but after serving that term he declined further appointment. ' In 1762, he was selected by the legislature, together with Cagsar Rodney, to revise and print the laws passed subsequent to 1752 ; a duty which they speedily and satisfactorily executed.

THE ASSEMBLY OF DELAWARE.
  In the same year Mr. McKean first embarked in the stormy sea of politics, which he continued to brave for nearly half a century. In October, 1762, he was elected a member of the Assembly from the county of Newcastle, and was annually returned for seventeen successive years. So much attached to him were the people of that county, that they continued to elect him, although for the last six years of this time he was residing in Philadelphia. He still however retained his house in Newcastle, probably because his business frequently called him to that city. Finally, on the 1st of October, 1779, on the day of the general election in Delaware, he attended at Newcastle, and in an address to his constituents, declined the honor of further re-election. He was then waited upon by six gentlemen in the name of the electors, who asked him to name seven persons suitable for representatives. He replied that he knew not only seven, but seventy, whom he considered worthy of their votes : but the request being repeated, he acceded and wrote down seven names. The election resulted in the choice of the seven gentlemen whom he had named."
A thorough review of the service by Thomas McKean is reviewed in this text. It provides great insight into the political atmosphere that existed in the establishment of the United States of America. Source Image. Citation Image.


Dr Levi Borden

1North Carolina, Duplin County, ps://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V1LM-96T. "North Carolina, Estate Files, 1663-1979
File Name: Levi Borden
Event Type: Probate
Event Place: Duplin County, North Carolina, United States
Event Year: 1821
Number of Names with File: 1
GS Film number: 001955209
Digital Folder Number: 005274779
First Image Number: 00261
Last Image Number: 00266
Number of Images: 6."


Charlotte Caroline Beck

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=109157426. "72 years old (Mrs. William Lawson)."

21850 U.S. Census, M432_29 pg 345, 10 Dec 1850. "James Lawson 41 M Farmer North Carolina
Charlotte Lawson 37 F North Carolina
Robert Lawson 20 M North Carolina
Hiram Lawson 17 M Arkansas
James Lawson 10 M Arkansas
H Clay Lawson 6 M North Carolina
Eliza Lawson 16 F Arkansas
Arkansas Lawson 14 F Arkansas
Mary Lawson 10 F Arkansas
Ellener Lawson 5 F Arkansas
Charlotte Lawson mother 60 F North Carolina
Margaret Borden 22 F North Carolina."


Margaret Octavia Borden

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=112247579.


Dr. Daniel Carpenter Yeiser

1Yeiser Bible, Nancy Housewright, 9424 Trail Hill Dr., Dallas, TX  75238. "HOLY BIBLE printed and sold by Collins and Co. 1814." photocopy in possn of T.Mason filed - Capt Philip Edward Yeiser. "Birthdate of 15 March 1789 on page 4." Although the birth date on the tombstone indicates his birth as March 1876, the sibling before him was born in Nov 1875. The year can not be correct. The family bible indicates Daniel was born in 1879.

2Yeiser Bible. "Dr. Daniel Yeiser 5th Nov 1876."

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/40948068/daniel-carpenter-yeiser. Although the birth date on the tombstone indicates the year of his birth as March 1876, the sibling before him was born in Nov 1875. The year can not be correct. The family bible indicates Daniel was born in 1879. Image.

4Yeiser Bible. "Page 3 - Daniel Yeiser and Catharine Samuel were married 7 Sept 1821."

5Kentucky Marriages 1802 -1850, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-10023-22590-44?cc=1804888, 8 Sep 1821. Image.

6Samuel, Dorothy Stanaland & Samuel Taliaferro Leslie, Samuell/Samuel families of Tidewater Virginia, The, Southern Historical Press, Montgomery Ala.. 1997, 929.273 Sa49st. ERROR: Indicates her death was in 1899 in DeAnn, Arkansas. (Refer to notes for additional detail.).

71850 U.S. Census, M432_192 pg 379, 24 Aug 1850. "Daniel Yeiser 60 M Farmer Maryland
Catherine  Yeiser 48 F Virginia
Henry Yeiser 20 M Kentucky
John Yeiser 16 M Kentucky
Samuel  Yeiser 11 M Kentucky
Fountain Yeiser 9 M Kentucky
Aphia Yeiser 7 F Kentucky
Mary Yeiser 5 F Kentucky
Benj Yeiser 1 M Kentucky
Rosa Yeiser 18 F Kentucky."

81860 U.S. Census, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZ1M-JSY, 14 Jul 1860. "Daniel Yeiser 71 M Farmer Maryland
Catherine Yeiser 58 F Virginia
Henry Yeiser 26 M Farmer  Kentucky
John Yeiser 23 M Farmer Kentucky
Samuel Yeiser 21 M Farmer Kentucky
Fountain M. Yeiser 19 M Farmer Kentucky
Benjamin Yeiser 10 M Kentucky
Affie J. Yeiser 17 F Kentucky
Mary D. Yeiser 13 F Kentucky

"United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZ1M-JSY : 14 December 2017), Daniel Yeiser, 1860." Image.

9Family record in possession of T.Mason. Image.


Catherine Fauntleroy Samuel

1Samuel, Dorothy Stanaland & Samuel Taliaferro Leslie, Samuell/Samuel families of Tidewater Virginia, The, Southern Historical Press, Montgomery Ala.. 1997, 929.273 Sa49st. ERROR: Indicates her death was in 1899 in DeAnn, Arkansas. (Refer to notes for additional detail.).

2Yeiser Bible, Nancy Housewright, 9424 Trail Hill Dr., Dallas, TX  75238. "HOLY BIBLE printed and sold by Collins and Co. 1814." photocopy in possn of T.Mason filed - Capt Philip Edward Yeiser. "Catharine S Yeiser wife of Dr D Yeiser Died 27 February 18__."

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=40948262. Image.

4Yeiser Bible. "Page 3 - Daniel Yeiser and Catharine Samuel were married 7 Sept 1821."

5Kentucky Marriages 1802 -1850, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-10023-22590-44?cc=1804888, 8 Sep 1821. Image.


Henry Samuel Yeiser

1Kentucky Death Index, 1911 - 2000. Volume 13, Certificate #23657.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=40949987. Image.


Rosa M. Yeiser

1Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, Case, Tiffany & Burnham. Hartford 1841, https://familysearch.org/photos/images/3387409. Original was in possession of Nell G. Borden, Louisville, Kentucky in 1964.
Typed Certified copy in possession of T.Mason. Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=43942694. Image.


Samuel Yeiser

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=43942715. Image.


Joseph B. Strouse

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=142596244. "son of Carson & Elizabeth Dunlap Strouse." Image.

2Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, Case, Tiffany & Burnham. Hartford 1841, pg 1. Original was in possession of Nell G. Borden, Louisville, Kentucky in 1964.
Typed Certified copy in possession of T.Mason. "Married on 22d of May 1882 Joseph B. Strouse to Alice, 2nd daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Borden." Image.

3Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ9-XFVT. "Name: J B Strouse
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 22 May 1882
Event Place: Pulaski, Kentucky, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 27
Birth Year (Estimated): 1855
Spouse's Name: Alice Borden
Spouse's Titles and Terms: Miss
Spouse's Gender: Female
Spouse's Age: 22
Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): 1860
Reference ID: 87
GS Film Number: 000804059
Digital Folder Number: 005293830
Image Number: 00106

Citing this Record
"Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ9-XFVT : accessed 2 November 2018), J B Strouse and Alice Borden, 22 May 1882; citing Pulaski, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 804,059." Image.


Alice Borden

1Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, Case, Tiffany & Burnham. Hartford 1841, https://familysearch.org/photos/images/3387402. Original was in possession of Nell G. Borden, Louisville, Kentucky in 1964.
Typed Certified copy in possession of T.Mason. Image.

2Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, Page 2. Image.

3Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, https://familysearch.org/photos/images/3387409. Image.

4FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=142596124. "daughter of Benjamin John & Sarah Jameson Yeiser Borden." Image.

5Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, pg 1. "Married on 22d of May 1882 Joseph B. Strouse to Alice, 2nd daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Borden." Image.

6Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ9-XFVT. "Name: J B Strouse
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 22 May 1882
Event Place: Pulaski, Kentucky, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 27
Birth Year (Estimated): 1855
Spouse's Name: Alice Borden
Spouse's Titles and Terms: Miss
Spouse's Gender: Female
Spouse's Age: 22
Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): 1860
Reference ID: 87
GS Film Number: 000804059
Digital Folder Number: 005293830
Image Number: 00106

Citing this Record
"Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ9-XFVT : accessed 2 November 2018), J B Strouse and Alice Borden, 22 May 1882; citing Pulaski, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 804,059." Image.


Judge James David Shaver

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114736308. Image.

2Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, Case, Tiffany & Burnham. Hartford 1841, pg 1. Original was in possession of Nell G. Borden, Louisville, Kentucky in 1964.
Typed Certified copy in possession of T.Mason. "Married on the 16th day of Dec. 1884 Jas. D. Shaver to Sallie H. Borden, 3d daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Borden." Image.

31900 U.S. Census, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M361-69L. "Name: James D Shaver
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1900
Event Place: Center Township Mena town Ward 1-3, Polk, Arkansas, United States
District: 96
Gender: Male
Age: 39
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Race (Original): W
Relationship to Head of Household: Head
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Head
Years Married: 15
Birth Date: Feb 1861
Birthplace: Arkansas
Marriage Year (Estimated): 1885
Father's Birthplace: Tennessee
Mother's Birthplace: Arkansas
Sheet Number and Letter: 15A
Household ID: 354
Line Number: 6
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T623
GS Film Number: 1240072
Digital Folder Number: 004119763
Image Number: 00097

Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
James D Shaver Head M 39 Arkansas
Sallie B Shaver Wife F 35 Arkansas
Robert B Shaver Son M 12 Arkansas
James D Shaver Son M 9 Arkansas
Dorothy Shaver Daughter F 7 Arkansas
Elsie Shaver Daughter F 5 Arkansas
Francis M Shaver Sister F 23 Texas
Robert G Shaver Father M 69 Tennessee." Image.


Sarah Hunter Borden

1Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, Case, Tiffany & Burnham. Hartford 1841, https://familysearch.org/photos/images/3387402. Original was in possession of Nell G. Borden, Louisville, Kentucky in 1964.
Typed Certified copy in possession of T.Mason. Image.

2Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, https://familysearch.org/photos/images/3387409. "Died on 20 Oct 1929 Sallie B. Shaver." Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114736265. Image.

4Bible - Benjamin John Borden family, pg 1. "Married on the 16th day of Dec. 1884 Jas. D. Shaver to Sallie H. Borden, 3d daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Borden." Image.

51900 U.S. Census, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M361-69G. Image.

61880 U.S. Census, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCZ2-VJ8. "Name: Sally H Borden
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1880
Event Place: La Grange, Oldham, Kentucky, United States
District: ED 150
Gender: Female
Age: 18
Marital Status: Single
Race: White
Race (Original): W
Occupation: School Teacher
Relationship to Head of Household: Daughter
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Dau
Birth Year (Estimated): 1862
Birthplace: Arkansas, United States
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina, United States
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia, United States
Note:
Sheet Letter: B
Sheet Number: 3
Sheet Number and Letter: 3B
Household ID: 13673045
Person Number: 4
Volume: 1
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T9
Affiliate Film Number: 0437
GS Film Number: 1254437
Digital Folder Number: 005160697
Image Number: 00012

Household      Role    Sex Age Birthplace
Benjamine Borden Self    M 62 North Carolina, United States
Sarah J Borden Wife    F 55 Kentucky, United States
Emma Borden     Daughter F 24 Arkansas, United States
Alice Borden   Daughter F 20 Arkansas, United States
Sally H Borden Daughter F 18 Arkansas, United States
John A Borden Son     M 16 Arkansas, United States
Kitty F Borden Daughter F 12 Kentucky, United States

Citing this Record:
"United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCZ2-VJ8 : 14 August 2017), Sally H Borden in household of Benjamine Borden, La Grange, Oldham, Kentucky, United States; citing enumeration district ED 150, sheet 3B, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0437; FHL microfilm 1,254,437." Image.


Elsie Shaver

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114736296. Image.


Dorothy Shaver

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114736292. "President of Lord & Taylor from 1945 until her death in 1959. The first woman in America to be CEO of a multi-million dollar company." Image.


Katherine Borden Shaver

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=114736287. Image.