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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Benjamin Borden

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants: (Berryville, Va. Chesapeake Book, c1963), p 15, 975.59 H2c. a history of Frederick County, Virginia, from its formation in 1738 to 1908, compiled mainly from original records of old Frederick County, now Hampshire, Berkeley, Shenandoah, Jefferson, Hardy, Clarke, Warren, Morgan and Frederick. "Recorded in Orange County prior to the holding of the first term of court in Frederick County, and are from Joist Hite: Oct 26th, 1737, to John Seaman for one thousand acres adjoining Benj. Borden."

3Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 16. "John McCormick, May 26, 1740, for three hundred and ninety-five acres adjoining the Borden, grifith and Hampton, etc. tract of eleven hundred and twenty-two acres."

4Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 20-21. "Friday sixth of December MD, CCXLIII (1743) court minutes. 2nd minute: the principal features relate to the first settlers near Shepherdstown. The next minute shows that the last will and testament of Benjamin Borden (Jr) was presented by his widow, Zeruiah, and Benjamin Borden - his son - who it will be seen was then, in 1743, of lawful age. the father without doubts being the Benjamin Borden who followed the Hite Colony. This will should have been read and studied by historians of Augusta County. The celebrated Burden Grant located on the "Upper" James river, is disposed of by the testator, and settles many errors in relation to this grant."

5Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 515. "Lieut. William Gooch, Governor of Virginia 1727-1737 for Virginia, a Royal Province."

6Joint Committee of Hopewell Friends, Assisted by Wayland, John Walter, Hopewell Friends history, 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia, Baltimore; Genealogical Pub. Co., 1975. Copyright 1936, pgs 25 - 27, 975.5992 K2h. Records of Hopewell Monthly Meetings and Meetings reporting to Hopewell, two hundred years of history and genealogy. "Benjamin Borden Jr, 850 acres. This land lies upon the western slope of Apple Pie Ridge in Frederick County, and 750 acres of the tract were sold by his executors, Benjamin Borden, Jr., his son, and Zeruiah Borden, his widow, on February 7, 1744. In this deed the grantee is referred to as "Benjamin Borden, Gent. late of Orange County, Colony of Virginia, Deceased." Neither Benjamin Borden nor his family ever resided on this tract, which appears to have been one of his many speculations in land. His home plantation, known as "Borden's Great Spring Tract," of 3143 acres, granted him October 3, 1734, joined Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax, on the southeast. Borden's house stood at, or near, the present residence of Thompson Sowers Esq., in Clarke County. He also had a tract of 1122 acres on the Bullskin Marsh near Summit Point, now W. Va., and a large tract on Smith's Creek, near New Market, Shenandoah County, Va. On November 6, 1739, he secured a patent for 92,100 acres on the headwaters of the James River, which became known as Borden's Manor, and lay mostly within the bounds of present Rockbridge County, Va. He appears to have been on intimate terms with Lord Fairfax, and by persistent tradition is benerally believed to have acted in some way as Fairfax's agent. (That Lord Fairfax purchased from his son John Borden, in 1756, 608 acres of the "Great Spring" tract at the very time he was waging a violent controversy with some settlers who claimed under Crown patents, certainly indicates some friendly arrangement with the Borden family.
    Benjamin Borden (Jr) was born in 1692 (SEE ERROR-CORRECTION), a son of Benjamin Borden and _____ Grover, near Freehold, N.J., and died in Frederick County, Va., in 1743. He married Zeruiah Winter of west New Jersey, and came to Virginia sometime in 1732. He was prominent in the affairs of the county and was appointed to the first bench of justices on the organization of Orange County in 1734, and of Frederick County, when it was set off from Orange in 1743. He with others was the subject of religious persecution by the Orange court in October and November, 1737. His will, dated April 3, 1742, and probated October 9, 1743, in Frederick County, mentions his wife Zeruiah, his sons Benjamin III, John, and Joseph, and his daughters Abigail, wife of Jacob Worthington, Hannah, wife of Capt. Edward Rogers, Mercy, wife of William Fearnley, Rebeckah, wife of Thomas Branson, Elizabeth, wife of _____ Branson, and Deborah and Lidy, still single. Witnesses: Thomas Sharp, Lancelot Westcott, Edward O. Borden, Thomas Hankins, and Thomas Rogers."
ERROR-CORRECTION; The Benjamin born in 1692 was the son of John and Mary (Earle) Borden and was an uncle to this Benjamin. The Benjamin who married Zeruiah and settled Borden's Manor in Virginia was born in 1675.

7J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), pgs 399-403, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Many and frequently inaccurate are the references in local histories of the Valley of Virginia and other regions to Benjamin Borden (Jr). It is said that a certain atmosphere of mystery surrounds him. Most of it, if not all, has been supplied by the writers of these imperfect chronicles. That he was honest, intelligent, ambitious and enterprising is evident; no less so that the natural limitations imposed upon him by his primitive environment thwarted his plans for his own career and for the future of his family.

Benjamin Borden (Jr) is said to have been a justice of Spotsylvania County, but the published records of that county make no mention of his name. He is said to have been an agent of Lord Fairfax in the settlement of the Northern Neck, and this claim is so ancient and so frequent that it may have some substance; but documentary proof to validate it has been lacking. His first recorded appearance in Virginia is apparently on January 21, 1734, when he was appointed one of the justices of the newly formed county of Orange. From that time till his death in 1743 his name appears frequently in land transactions in various parts of the Shenandoah Valley. His most important enterprise was the settlement of Borden's Great Tract," a grant to him from George II under date of November 6, 1739 of 92,100 acres in what later became Rockbridge County. A fairly accurate though quite unsympathetic account of this his main enterprise may be found in 0. F. Morton's "History of Rockbridge County" (1920). Other well known sources are Waddell's "Annals of Augusta County" and Peyton's "History of Augusta County." Many times the legend has been told of Benjamin Borden's slaying a young buffalo, carrying it to Williamsburg to Governor Gooch and thereby so delighting that dignitary as to receive 500,000 acres of the public domain as a reward. A somewhat distorted version of the legend appears in E. Duis' "Good Old Times in McLean County, Illinois" (1874). There we learn that "Ben Burden was a notable man. He came to America from England and shortly after signalized his arrival by capturing a buffalo calf and sending it to England as a present to Queen Elizabeth. The Queen showed her appreciation of it by granting him one hundred thousand acres of land in the Virginia Valley." Had he made his gift to Queen 'Victoria, he would have been guilty of only a slightly greater anachronism.

The purpose of these notes, which are based chiefly on numerous published and unpublished court records of New Jersey and Virginia, is to identify Benjamin Borden (Jr) with his immediate ancestry and descendants."

8J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants, p 400. "In the "Borden Genealogy (1899) by Hattie Borden Weld, Benjamin Borden of Virginia was confused with his first cousin of the same name born in 1692, son of John And Mary (Earle) Borden. A careful examination of New Jersey court records, too involved to be given here, is the basis for this correction in a generally excellent family history."

9Zella Armstrong, Notable Southern Families (Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore, 1974.), p 23, G929.2. Printed from Family Archive Viewer CD191, Broderbund Software, Sep. 17, 2000. ERROR: On page 23 Zella Armstrong indicates that the Benjamin born of John and Mary (Earle) Borden was married to Jerusah and settled Borden's Manor in Virginia. She confused him with this first cousin, Benjamin who was born in 1675 to his uncle Benjamin.

10FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=60781030. "     Genealogist J.A. Kelly wrote the following in the William And Mary Quarterly in October 1931 on page 325, "Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer". "... That he was honest, intelligent, ambitious and enterprising is evident; no less so that the natural limitation imposed upon him by his primitive environment thwarted his plans for his own career and for the future of his family. ... His first recorded appearance in Virginia was apparently on January 21, 1734, when he was appointed one of the justices of the newly formed county of Orange. From that time till his death in 1743 his name appears frequently in land transactions in various parts of the Shenandoah Valley. His most important enterprise was the settlement of "The Patent for Borden's Great Tract" which was granted to him from King George II on 6 November 1739 by William Gooch Esquire, the Lieutenant Governor at Williamsburg, Virginia for 92,100 acres in what later became Rockbridge County." Parcels of this land became the campuses for Washington and Lee University and Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.
[Many unproven legends and inaccurate information about his birth date, parents and how he obtained this land abound.]
    Benjamin Borden's father, Benjamin, was born at Portsmouth, Rhode Island May 16, 1649. In 1665 Benjamin Jr. settled on some of his father's lands in Monmouth County, New Jersey where he held elective positions. His father married Abigail Grover September 1, 1670, who died January 8, 1720. His father then married Susannah Page who administered his estate in 1728. Benjamin Jr's brother, Joseph (1687-1765) was the first English child born in Portsmouth and was the founder of Bordentown and a leading citizen of New Jersey. The father of Benjamin's mother was James Grover, who was active in the settlement of East Jersey. He was one of the grantees of the Monmouth County patents in 1663.
    Benjamin was born in Monmouth County, New Jersey April 6, 1675 where he resided before moving to Freehold, Virginia. He died in 1743 near Winchester, Virginia about the time of his appointment as one of the original justices of Frederick county. His wife, Zeruiah Winter was his cousin, being a daughter of of William Winter who married Hannah Grover, the daughter of the James and Rebecca Grover. He and Zeruiah had (three sons and seven daughters), all except the youngest born in Middletown, New Jersey.
    The Fifth Lord Fairfax married the daughter of Lord Culpepper and by this alliance obtained possession of Culpepper grants in Virginia that had been issued by James II of England to Culpepper, for lands known as the "Northern Neck" which included ten counties in lower Shenandoah Valley. Borden was Lord Fairfax's agent in America and was therefore known as "Fairfax Ben". Benjamin's home plantation known as "Borden's Great Spring Tract" of 3143 acres, granted him 3 Oct 1734, which shared a boundary Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax, on the S-E. Borden's house stood at or near the present residence in what is now Clark County. In September 1737 Fairfax Ben Borden became anxious to establish the boundary lines of his land grant. He had agreed to deed to each resident settler 100 acres of land and promised the privilege of buying land at the rate of 50 shillings for 100 acres. Each cabin meant 1000 acres granted to Borden. James McDowell, was educated & grew to manhood in Ireland. He had located in Borden's Grant in the spring, and raised a crop of corn on the South Fork of the Shenandoah near Woods's gap. One night, Benjamin Borden, Jr. came up and asked leave to spend the night there. Borden exhibited documents which satisfied the McDowells he held the grant for the large body of land, and he offered to give one thousand acres to anyone who could help. Assisted by James Wood, Orange Co. surveyor, when Borden left the grant in 1739, having secured his grant, he committed his interests largely to John McDowell, who attended to them in his absence.
    John McDowell and his wife, Magdalene, then were responsible for bringing into the grant most of the 92 original families in 1738-1739, and the deed for the grant was recorded in 1739 for a total of 92,100 acres. John McDowell with eight of his men, on December 25, 1742 fell into an ambush and was killed by indians. Just about a year later his widow married Benjamin Borden III.
     It seems Benjamin Jr. followed the pattern of land speculation of his father. There is documentation of purchases from 1700 through 1743 by him and his wife, Zeuriah. At the time of his death he possessed approximately 130,000 acres of land in Virginia and New Jersey. In his will he leaves his lands in New Jersey as well as land in Bullshire, Smith's Creek, North Shenandoah and James River, except 5000 acres which is devised to his daughters, Abigail Worthington, Rebecca Bronson, Deborah Borden, Lydia Borden and Elizabeth Borden; other legacies and devises to sons: Benjamin, John and Joseph; and his wife, Zeuriah and daughter Marcy Fearnley, the Wife of William Fearnley. In 1746 Zeuriah, on account of bodily infirmities, resigned and Benjamin took the estate. In April 1753 Benjamin Borden III died.
     Law suits and counter suits between the daughter Lydia, who married Jacob Peck, and her descendants vs. descendants of her brothers and sisters, regarding the settling of the estate, continued for about one hundred and fifty years. Records concerning this legal battle are said to fill a filing cabinet in the Clerk's office at Staunton (Augusta County, formerly Orange County), Virginia. Benjamin Borden, Jr., because of his close and profitable relationship with Lord Fairfax, is referred to as "Fairfax Ben" in these legal records. Affidavits and other records in this file are of much value in tracing descendants of Benjamin and proving the relationship between the White County Burdens and the earlier generations of the Borden family." Image.

11The Generations Network, Inc., 2004, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing. "Name: Benjamin Borden
Gender: Male
Birth Place: NJ
Birth Year: 1675
Spouse Name: Zeruiah Winter
Spouse Birth Year: 1691
Marriage
Year: 1711
Number Pages: 1."
COMMENT: Zeruiah's birth year is likely incorrect given the ages of her children which also suggest that their marriage was around 1700.

12Chalkley, Lyman; Judge of the County Court of Augusta County, Virginia, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: extracted from original court records of Augusta County, 1754-1800, Mary S. Lockwood, VP General, National Society, DAR. Volume III. The Commonwealth Co., Rosslyn, Va., pg 256, FHL 162044. "Page 20.--19th June, 1746. Zeruiah Borden, widow, of Frederick County and Benj. Borden, of Augusta, executors of Benj. Borden, late of Orange, to Francis McCune, £3 current money Virginia; 328 acres, part of 92,100 acres patented to Benjamin, Sr. 6th November, 1739, the Barrens on the south side of the creek; corner to Joseph Kennedy. Witnesses, Jno. Smith, Samson Archee, Repentance Townsend. Acknowledged by Benjamin in person and for Zeruiah, 19th June, 1746."
This shows proof of the correct spelling of her name, of being a widow in 1746 and of having a son Benjamin. Image.

13Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), pg 49, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "Religious persecution of his family continued after his death and the Frederick County records show that on May 7, 1746, the Grand Jury of Frederick County presented Zeruiah Borden, Deborah Borden and Mercy Fernley for speaking several prophane, scandalous, and contemptible words against the holy order of baptism." Image.

14William and Mary College Quarterly historical magazine, Whittet & Shepperson, Richmond, Virginia, October 1931 - pg 326. Image.

15Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, Page 411. Image.

16Virginia, Frederick County. Image.


Zeruiah Winter

1Chalkley, Lyman; Judge of the County Court of Augusta County, Virginia, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: extracted from original court records of Augusta County, 1754-1800, Mary S. Lockwood, VP General, National Society, DAR. Volume III. The Commonwealth Co., Rosslyn, Va., pg 256, FHL 162044. "Page 20.--19th June, 1746. Zeruiah Borden, widow, of Frederick County and Benj. Borden, of Augusta, executors of Benj. Borden, late of Orange, to Francis McCune, £3 current money Virginia; 328 acres, part of 92,100 acres patented to Benjamin, Sr. 6th November, 1739, the Barrens on the south side of the creek; corner to Joseph Kennedy. Witnesses, Jno. Smith, Samson Archee, Repentance Townsend. Acknowledged by Benjamin in person and for Zeruiah, 19th June, 1746."
This shows proof of the correct spelling of her name, of being a widow in 1746 and of having a son Benjamin. Image.

2Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), pg 49, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "Religious persecution of his family continued after his death and the Frederick County records show that on May 7, 1746, the Grand Jury of Frederick County presented Zeruiah Borden, Deborah Borden and Mercy Fernley for speaking several prophane, scandalous, and contemptible words against the holy order of baptism." Image.

3William and Mary College Quarterly historical magazine, Whittet & Shepperson, Richmond, Virginia, October 1931 - pg 326. Image.

4Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants: (Berryville, Va. Chesapeake Book, c1963), Page 411, 975.59 H2c. a history of Frederick County, Virginia, from its formation in 1738 to 1908, compiled mainly from original records of old Frederick County, now Hampshire, Berkeley, Shenandoah, Jefferson, Hardy, Clarke, Warren, Morgan and Frederick. Image.

5FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/60781082/zeruriah-borden. Image.

6The Generations Network, Inc., 2004, U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing. "Name: Benjamin Borden
Gender: Male
Birth Place: NJ
Birth Year: 1675
Spouse Name: Zeruiah Winter
Spouse Birth Year: 1691
Marriage
Year: 1711
Number Pages: 1."
COMMENT: Zeruiah's birth year is likely incorrect given the ages of her children which also suggest that their marriage was around 1700.

7Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

8Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 15. "Recorded in Orange County prior to the holding of the first term of court in Frederick County, and are from Joist Hite: Oct 26th, 1737, to John Seaman for one thousand acres adjoining Benj. Borden."

9Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 16. "John McCormick, May 26, 1740, for three hundred and ninety-five acres adjoining the Borden, grifith and Hampton, etc. tract of eleven hundred and twenty-two acres."

10Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 20-21. "Friday sixth of December MD, CCXLIII (1743) court minutes. 2nd minute: the principal features relate to the first settlers near Shepherdstown. The next minute shows that the last will and testament of Benjamin Borden (Jr) was presented by his widow, Zeruiah, and Benjamin Borden - his son - who it will be seen was then, in 1743, of lawful age. the father without doubts being the Benjamin Borden who followed the Hite Colony. This will should have been read and studied by historians of Augusta County. The celebrated Burden Grant located on the "Upper" James river, is disposed of by the testator, and settles many errors in relation to this grant."

11Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p 515. "Lieut. William Gooch, Governor of Virginia 1727-1737 for Virginia, a Royal Province."

12Joint Committee of Hopewell Friends, Assisted by Wayland, John Walter, Hopewell Friends history, 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia, Baltimore; Genealogical Pub. Co., 1975. Copyright 1936, pgs 25 - 27, 975.5992 K2h. Records of Hopewell Monthly Meetings and Meetings reporting to Hopewell, two hundred years of history and genealogy. "Benjamin Borden Jr, 850 acres. This land lies upon the western slope of Apple Pie Ridge in Frederick County, and 750 acres of the tract were sold by his executors, Benjamin Borden, Jr., his son, and Zeruiah Borden, his widow, on February 7, 1744. In this deed the grantee is referred to as "Benjamin Borden, Gent. late of Orange County, Colony of Virginia, Deceased." Neither Benjamin Borden nor his family ever resided on this tract, which appears to have been one of his many speculations in land. His home plantation, known as "Borden's Great Spring Tract," of 3143 acres, granted him October 3, 1734, joined Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax, on the southeast. Borden's house stood at, or near, the present residence of Thompson Sowers Esq., in Clarke County. He also had a tract of 1122 acres on the Bullskin Marsh near Summit Point, now W. Va., and a large tract on Smith's Creek, near New Market, Shenandoah County, Va. On November 6, 1739, he secured a patent for 92,100 acres on the headwaters of the James River, which became known as Borden's Manor, and lay mostly within the bounds of present Rockbridge County, Va. He appears to have been on intimate terms with Lord Fairfax, and by persistent tradition is benerally believed to have acted in some way as Fairfax's agent. (That Lord Fairfax purchased from his son John Borden, in 1756, 608 acres of the "Great Spring" tract at the very time he was waging a violent controversy with some settlers who claimed under Crown patents, certainly indicates some friendly arrangement with the Borden family.
    Benjamin Borden (Jr) was born in 1692 (SEE ERROR-CORRECTION), a son of Benjamin Borden and _____ Grover, near Freehold, N.J., and died in Frederick County, Va., in 1743. He married Zeruiah Winter of west New Jersey, and came to Virginia sometime in 1732. He was prominent in the affairs of the county and was appointed to the first bench of justices on the organization of Orange County in 1734, and of Frederick County, when it was set off from Orange in 1743. He with others was the subject of religious persecution by the Orange court in October and November, 1737. His will, dated April 3, 1742, and probated October 9, 1743, in Frederick County, mentions his wife Zeruiah, his sons Benjamin III, John, and Joseph, and his daughters Abigail, wife of Jacob Worthington, Hannah, wife of Capt. Edward Rogers, Mercy, wife of William Fearnley, Rebeckah, wife of Thomas Branson, Elizabeth, wife of _____ Branson, and Deborah and Lidy, still single. Witnesses: Thomas Sharp, Lancelot Westcott, Edward O. Borden, Thomas Hankins, and Thomas Rogers."
ERROR-CORRECTION; The Benjamin born in 1692 was the son of John and Mary (Earle) Borden and was an uncle to this Benjamin. The Benjamin who married Zeruiah and settled Borden's Manor in Virginia was born in 1675.

13J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), pgs 399-403, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Many and frequently inaccurate are the references in local histories of the Valley of Virginia and other regions to Benjamin Borden (Jr). It is said that a certain atmosphere of mystery surrounds him. Most of it, if not all, has been supplied by the writers of these imperfect chronicles. That he was honest, intelligent, ambitious and enterprising is evident; no less so that the natural limitations imposed upon him by his primitive environment thwarted his plans for his own career and for the future of his family.

Benjamin Borden (Jr) is said to have been a justice of Spotsylvania County, but the published records of that county make no mention of his name. He is said to have been an agent of Lord Fairfax in the settlement of the Northern Neck, and this claim is so ancient and so frequent that it may have some substance; but documentary proof to validate it has been lacking. His first recorded appearance in Virginia is apparently on January 21, 1734, when he was appointed one of the justices of the newly formed county of Orange. From that time till his death in 1743 his name appears frequently in land transactions in various parts of the Shenandoah Valley. His most important enterprise was the settlement of Borden's Great Tract," a grant to him from George II under date of November 6, 1739 of 92,100 acres in what later became Rockbridge County. A fairly accurate though quite unsympathetic account of this his main enterprise may be found in 0. F. Morton's "History of Rockbridge County" (1920). Other well known sources are Waddell's "Annals of Augusta County" and Peyton's "History of Augusta County." Many times the legend has been told of Benjamin Borden's slaying a young buffalo, carrying it to Williamsburg to Governor Gooch and thereby so delighting that dignitary as to receive 500,000 acres of the public domain as a reward. A somewhat distorted version of the legend appears in E. Duis' "Good Old Times in McLean County, Illinois" (1874). There we learn that "Ben Burden was a notable man. He came to America from England and shortly after signalized his arrival by capturing a buffalo calf and sending it to England as a present to Queen Elizabeth. The Queen showed her appreciation of it by granting him one hundred thousand acres of land in the Virginia Valley." Had he made his gift to Queen 'Victoria, he would have been guilty of only a slightly greater anachronism.

The purpose of these notes, which are based chiefly on numerous published and unpublished court records of New Jersey and Virginia, is to identify Benjamin Borden (Jr) with his immediate ancestry and descendants."

14J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants, p 400. "In the "Borden Genealogy (1899) by Hattie Borden Weld, Benjamin Borden of Virginia was confused with his first cousin of the same name born in 1692, son of John And Mary (Earle) Borden. A careful examination of New Jersey court records, too involved to be given here, is the basis for this correction in a generally excellent family history."

15Zella Armstrong, Notable Southern Families (Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore, 1974.), p 23, G929.2. Printed from Family Archive Viewer CD191, Broderbund Software, Sep. 17, 2000. ERROR: On page 23 Zella Armstrong indicates that the Benjamin born of John and Mary (Earle) Borden was married to Jerusah and settled Borden's Manor in Virginia. She confused him with this first cousin, Benjamin who was born in 1675 to his uncle Benjamin.

16Virginia, Prince William County. deeds, 1731-1869, 1748 Deed Book L, Pgs 92-94. FHL 7897262. Image.


Robert Warren

1Virginia, Surry county Wills and Administrations, 1652-1850. "Will of Allen Warren, Jr. proved 15 Aug 1733

To my wife, [Ann Hart] bed & furn., riding horse, saddle, bridle, etc
To son Allen, all land I hold in this Co, bed, furn., where I now lie, 1 Negro; my "Trooper's Arms" and enjoy his inheritance at once. 3 bbls corn,
To son Robert, all land I hold in Prince George Co*. -and proceeds of sale of negro girl., 808 pds. tobacco, in hands of Mr. Bridger, sheriff in Isle of Wight, and to remain with mother until 21 yrs. old. If wife remarries, he to have his est. when 18 yrs.
wife, and 4 dtrs, Sarah, Elizabeth, Lucy & Mary to have rest of estate.
Wife, (unnamed) EXR
Wits: Chas. Bins, Saml. Sands, Thos. Foster."


Capt William Saunders

1North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7, Pt1-2 p 387. "William Sanders 1 free white male over 16, 2 free white females, 3 others free, 6 slaves." Halifax District.

2Georgia, Hancock county Minute Book. 1799-1817, Page 153, 8 Feb 1805. Image.

3J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), p 403, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Settled in Meriwether Co., GA."

4William and Mary College Quarterly historical magazine, Whittet & Shepperson, Richmond, Virginia, October 1931. pg 329. Image.


Mary Borden

1J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), p 403, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Settled in Meriwether Co., GA."

2William and Mary College Quarterly historical magazine, Whittet & Shepperson, Richmond, Virginia, October 1931. pg 329. Image.

3Georgia, Wills and Probate Records, 1742-1992. Image.

4Georgia, Wills and Probate Records, 1742-1992.


Richard Joseph Sasnett Jr.

1North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7. "Sarsnett, Richd 1 Free White Male of 16 and upwards, 1 Free white Female, 1 Slave."

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=76497169. "Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia - Borden's County of Mounted Riflemen.
1805 Land Lottery OG Georgia, Hancock County, District 1025." Image.

3J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), p 403, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Settled about 1800 in Hancock County, GA."


Rebecca Randolph Borden

1J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), p 403, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Settled about 1800 in Hancock County, GA."

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=80066685. Image.


Solomon Saunders

1North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1800 U.S. Census, M32  Roll 30, p.241. "Christian Sanders 1 female over 45 and 1 slave."

2North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7, Pt1-2 p 410. "Christian Sanders 1 free white female, 3 all other free, 4 slaves." Halifax District.


Christian Josey

1North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1800 U.S. Census, M32  Roll 30, p.241. "Christian Sanders 1 female over 45 and 1 slave."

2North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7, Pt1-2 p 410. "Christian Sanders 1 free white female, 3 all other free, 4 slaves." Halifax District.


Richard Joseph Sasnett Jr.

1North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7. "Sarsnett, Richd 1 Free White Male of 16 and upwards, 1 Free white Female, 1 Slave."

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=76497169. "Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia - Borden's County of Mounted Riflemen.
1805 Land Lottery OG Georgia, Hancock County, District 1025." Image.


Eva Henderson

1North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7. "Sarsnett, Richd 1 Free White Male of 16 and upwards, 1 Free white Female, 1 Slave."


Richard Sasnett

1Judge Frank L. Little, Sasnett Family Records Book, Elizabeth deParry, 4748 Aberdeen Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Written about 1910. "In 1763 Governor Caswell, the Colonial Governor of North Carolina bestowed on Richard Sasnett a tract of land situated on Beaverdam Creek in Edgecomb Co. NC, and providing that for every fifty shillings paid into the Treasury of North Carolina a deed to One Hundred additional acres would be given him.

On the county records is a deed from Richard Sasnett, Senior to Richard Sasnett, Junior made in 1773; also a deed from Mary Maria Maeta Sasnett to a half interest in a mill situated on Beaverdam Creek, still known to some as the Sasnett Mill."

2North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7. "Sarsnett, Richard, Senr. 3 Free White Males of 16 and Upwards, 2 Free White Males Under 16, 2 Free White Females, 3 Slaves."


Henrietta Maria Gosney

1Judge Frank L. Little, Sasnett Family Records Book, Elizabeth deParry, 4748 Aberdeen Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Written about 1910. "In 1763 Governor Caswell, the Colonial Governor of North Carolina bestowed on Richard Sasnett a tract of land situated on Beaverdam Creek in Edgecomb Co. NC, and providing that for every fifty shillings paid into the Treasury of North Carolina a deed to One Hundred additional acres would be given him.

On the county records is a deed from Richard Sasnett, Senior to Richard Sasnett, Junior made in 1773; also a deed from Mary Maria Maeta Sasnett to a half interest in a mill situated on Beaverdam Creek, still known to some as the Sasnett Mill."

2North Carolina, Edgecombe County 1790 U.S. Census, Film: M637 Roll 7. "Sarsnett, Richard, Senr. 3 Free White Males of 16 and Upwards, 2 Free White Males Under 16, 2 Free White Females, 3 Slaves."


Clay Pinkney Whaley

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6025232/clay-whaley. "S1 US Coast Guard
World War II." Image.


Blanche M Stansberry

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/6025241/blanche-m.-whaley. Image.


Charlotte Caroline Beck

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=109157426. "72 years old (Mrs. William Lawson)."

21850 U.S. Census, M432_29 pg 345, 10 Dec 1850. "James Lawson 41 M Farmer North Carolina
Charlotte Lawson 37 F North Carolina
Robert Lawson 20 M North Carolina
Hiram Lawson 17 M Arkansas
James Lawson 10 M Arkansas
H Clay Lawson 6 M North Carolina
Eliza Lawson 16 F Arkansas
Arkansas Lawson 14 F Arkansas
Mary Lawson 10 F Arkansas
Ellener Lawson 5 F Arkansas
Charlotte Lawson mother 60 F North Carolina
Margaret Borden 22 F North Carolina."