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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Joseph Borden

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=25805603. "
Joseph Borden was born on 12 May 1687 in Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey. He died on 22 Sep 1765 in Bordentown, Burlington, New Jersey. He was buried in Old Borden Cemetery, Bordentown, Burlington Co., New Jersey. Bordentown was previously named Farnsworth Landing." Image.


Rebecca Grover

1Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Pages 268-269, 974 D2. "
  REBECCA GROVER, daughter of Joseph Grover, 2, married William, son of James Bowne, the First, of Middletown. He died in 1706, and she probably married Joseph Borden, as deduced from the partition suit brought, in 1711, by Mary Johnson against Hannah Seabrook and others.
  1720, Dec. 30. James Bowne, of Middletown, yeoman, sold to James Grover, of Middletown, for valuable considerations, land, lying, at Crosswicks, which he heired from his brother, William Bowne, bounded by the Burlington Path, by land formerly John Throckmorton's, by land formerly Joseph Throckmorton's, by land of John and James Ashton, etc., containing four hundred and eighty acres, as appears by a patent, to James Bowne, in the year 1688. In the deed, it is set forth that William Bowne, and his wife Rebecca, both lately deceased, of Middletown, owned land, at Crosswicks, which the said William Bowne devised, by will dated Apr. 27, 1706, to his wife, Rebecca, and the child she then went with, and that both wife and child had since died, so that James Bowne became the heir-at-law, to the said William Bowne, and that James Grover became the heir-at-law, of the said Rebecca.

  Issue
Hannah Bowne, born in 1706; living in 1711." Source Image. Citation Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=47199892. Image.


Joseph Borden

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=25805603. "
Joseph Borden was born on 12 May 1687 in Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey. He died on 22 Sep 1765 in Bordentown, Burlington, New Jersey. He was buried in Old Borden Cemetery, Bordentown, Burlington Co., New Jersey. Bordentown was previously named Farnsworth Landing." Image.

4Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, 974 D2. "
  SUSANNAH GROVER, daughter of Joseph Grover, 2, married Joseph, son of Benjamin and Abigail (Grover) Borden, born May 12, 1687; died Sep. 22, 1765.
  1787, Mch. 16. "Silvanus Grover, of Middletown, a Quaker, affirms that he is well acquainted with the state of Joseph Grover his grandfather's family. That his grandfather had six daughters, legatees to the said Joseph Grover by his last will and testament, to whom he bequeathed all his proprietary rights, of whom Susannah and Hannah were two. Susannah intermarried with Joseph Burden, by whom she had issue one daughter, Rebecca, who married Joseph Brown, reputed heir of Susannah Burden, and thereby inherited her mother's share of her grandfather's rights. Hannah married James Seabrook, and had a son, Daniel, reputed heir of James and Hannah, and the said Daniel had issue, with others, Thomas Seabrook, who is the reputed heir of Daniel his father."
Book " D . " Proprietary Records, at Perth Amboy.

  Issue
Rebecca Borden; married Joseph Brown.
Joseph Borden, born Aug. 1, 1719; died 1789; married Elizabeth Rogers, born July 10, 1725; died Nov. 2, 1807.
Hannah Borden; married, license, Apl. 26, 1731, John Lawrence.
Elizabeth Borden; married, license, Jan. 9, 1734, Thomas Douglas.
Amy Borden, baptized Apl. 8, 1750, 5 months old; married William Potts, born 1745; died July 25, 1783.
Abigail Borden; married, first, Mr. Clayton; second, Micajah, son of Micajah and Martha How, and sheriff of Hunterdon Co.
Daughter Borden."

Comments about Citation:
William Potts who married Amy Borden was born in 1721 instead of 1745. Refer to his gravestone.

The FindaGrave site of Judge Joseph Borden Jr. identifies his mother as Mary Anne Conover. Image.


Susannah Grover

1Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, 974 D2. "
  SUSANNAH GROVER, daughter of Joseph Grover, 2, married Joseph, son of Benjamin and Abigail (Grover) Borden, born May 12, 1687; died Sep. 22, 1765.
  1787, Mch. 16. "Silvanus Grover, of Middletown, a Quaker, affirms that he is well acquainted with the state of Joseph Grover his grandfather's family. That his grandfather had six daughters, legatees to the said Joseph Grover by his last will and testament, to whom he bequeathed all his proprietary rights, of whom Susannah and Hannah were two. Susannah intermarried with Joseph Burden, by whom she had issue one daughter, Rebecca, who married Joseph Brown, reputed heir of Susannah Burden, and thereby inherited her mother's share of her grandfather's rights. Hannah married James Seabrook, and had a son, Daniel, reputed heir of James and Hannah, and the said Daniel had issue, with others, Thomas Seabrook, who is the reputed heir of Daniel his father."
Book " D . " Proprietary Records, at Perth Amboy.

  Issue
Rebecca Borden; married Joseph Brown.
Joseph Borden, born Aug. 1, 1719; died 1789; married Elizabeth Rogers, born July 10, 1725; died Nov. 2, 1807.
Hannah Borden; married, license, Apl. 26, 1731, John Lawrence.
Elizabeth Borden; married, license, Jan. 9, 1734, Thomas Douglas.
Amy Borden, baptized Apl. 8, 1750, 5 months old; married William Potts, born 1745; died July 25, 1783.
Abigail Borden; married, first, Mr. Clayton; second, Micajah, son of Micajah and Martha How, and sheriff of Hunterdon Co.
Daughter Borden."

Comments about Citation:
William Potts who married Amy Borden was born in 1721 instead of 1745. Refer to his gravestone.

The FindaGrave site of Judge Joseph Borden Jr. identifies his mother as Mary Anne Conover. Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=123029789. "
Susannah and Joseph were married in Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co, NJ, and they were the parents of:
Amy/23 Jul 1723 (Mrs William Thomas Potts)
Abigail/1727 (Mrs Micajah How, Jr)." Image.

3Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

4Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.


Joseph Borden

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=25805603. "
Joseph Borden was born on 12 May 1687 in Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey. He died on 22 Sep 1765 in Bordentown, Burlington, New Jersey. He was buried in Old Borden Cemetery, Bordentown, Burlington Co., New Jersey. Bordentown was previously named Farnsworth Landing." Image.


Mary Anne Van Kouvenhoven

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.


Joseph Borden

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.

3FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=25805603. "
Joseph Borden was born on 12 May 1687 in Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey. He died on 22 Sep 1765 in Bordentown, Burlington, New Jersey. He was buried in Old Borden Cemetery, Bordentown, Burlington Co., New Jersey. Bordentown was previously named Farnsworth Landing." Image.


Elizabeth Pancoast

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2Buchanan, Roberdeau. Bayard, Thomas, McKean Family of Pennsylvania, Genealogy of the, Inquirer Printing Co., 1890. xiv, 273 p., Page 16. "
Joseph, born May 12, 1687, probably near Freehold, and when about thirty years of age removed to Tamsworth's Landing. He was married about the year 1717 to Ann Conover (formerly Covenhoven), of Monmouth county, New Jersey. By deed, March 3, 1724, he purchased of Samuel Tamsworth  one hundred and five acres of land, and subsequently more, and eventually owned the whole site of Bordentown. He ws thus possessed of very considerable means, and founded and named the town of Bordentown. His wife died March 11, 1744-5, in her 58th year. He died September 22, 1765, leaving one son and six daughters. His will is recorded in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J." Source Image. Citation Image.


Safety Borden

1Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 2, Page 258, 974 D2. "
Joined Baptist Church in Middletown, N.J.
April 1734
Safety Borden." Image.


James Borden

1New Jersey, Monmouth County. Colonial Wills 1731-1735, http://files.usgwarchives.net/nj/monmouth/wills/colwills11.txt. "BORDEN, JAMES of the Township of Freehold, Mon. Co., yeoman, "Being very Sick and Weak in Body." Dated Dec. 23, 1727. Proved by oath of Richard Horsfull and William Lawrie, two of the wits., that the other wit., Thomas Lawrie, signed in their presence; before Samuel Bustill, D. Surrogate, Feb. 22, 1730, at Burlington.

Gives: "Unto my Loveing Wife Mary (With the Legacy and Bequeft hereafter Mentioned) Instead of her Dower the "Ufe of the Plantation I now dwell on Untill she marry Or my son Richard Comes to Twenty one years of age which shall "firft happen and if she shall Continue my widow after my said son Richard Comes to Age as aforesaid
Then .... "unto my said Wife the ufe of one half of sd plantation as long as she then shall Continue my Widow and one Quarter ".... Unto my son Joseph; And the other Quarter of said plantation Unto my son Richard for so long time as their "Mother shall live or Remains Unmarryed ...."; "that my son Joseph Six Years Hence pay Unto my Daughter "Inocent five pounds and so Every year after for three years more five pound a year Untill he pay her Twenty pounds In "all money at Eight shillings per ounce, And if he or his heirs .... Default In all or any part of the said payments "then .. my sd Daughter Inocent her heirs .... Into the Lands of the said Joseph to Enter and the sd Land "to hold Untill she be fully paid all or the Remaining part of the Legacy .... out of the Profits of his said Part "of the Land ...."

"That my son Richard In one Year after he Comes to age pay unto my sd Daughter Innocent "five pounds, and the year following five pounds more, And the year following five pounds Unto my Daughter Phebe and "the year after that five pounds more Unto my said Daughter Phebe, And if he or his heirs .... shall .... "Default in all or any part or parts of said payments, Then .... my faid Daughters their heirs .... or "Either of them their heirs .... Into the Lands hereby bequeathed Unto the said Richard to Enter and the same "to hold or Either of them .... According as Default hath been made Untill they or she be fully paid all or the "remaining part .... of said Legacys out of the Profits of said Land that shall fall to said Richards part ...." "Unto my son Joseph Borden his heirs .... after the Marriage or Death of his Mother (whether before or after my "son Richard Comes to Age) The one half of my Plantation to be Equally Divided In Quantity and Quality ...." "Unto my son Richard Borden his heirs .... After the Marriage or Death of his Mother (which shall firft happen "before or after he Comes to age) The other half of my plantation to be Equally Divided In Quantity and Quality ...." "Unto my five other Daughters (Viz) Rebeckah, Abigaill, Mary, Hellen, and Ann a shilling a Piece money at Eight Shillings p ounce as all the above Legacys are to be ...."; "after all .... Debts are paid and the Debt of the Loan "office Discharged, .... Unto my Wife (Instead of her Dower ....) the Ufe of the Remaining part of my "Moveable Eftate During her life and at her Death to be Dispofed amongft my Chilldren as she shall think fitt."

Appoints "my Loveing Friends James Lowry and Robert Lawrence Executors ...."

Wits.:                                              JAMES BORDEN      

Richard Horsfull      William Lawrie      Thomas Lawrie

Affirmation of Executrix, Mary Borden, "Relict of James Borden," "being one of the people called Quakers"; before Samuel Bustill, D. Surrogate, Feb. 22, 1730, at Burlington." Image.

2New Jersey, Monmouth County. Colonial Wills 1731-1735, http://files.usgwarchives.net/nj/monmouth/wills/colwills11.txt, 22 Feb 1730. "N.J. Calendar of Wills, Vol 23,p.46. New Jersey, Monmouth County, Colonial Wills 1731-1735. Monmouth Co, NJ. Dated 23 Dec 1727, proved 22 Feb 1730.
BORDEN, JAMES of the Township of Freehold, Mon. Co., yeoman, "Being very Sick and Weak in Body." Dated Dec. 23, 1727.
   Proved by oath of Richard Horsfull and William Lawrie, two of the wits., that the other wit., Thomas Lawrie, signed in their presence; before Samuel Bustill, D. Surrogate, Feb. 22, 1730, at Burlington.
   Gives: "Unto my Loveing Wife Mary (With the Legacy and Bequeft hereafter Mentioned) Instead of her Dower the "Wife of the Plantation I now dwell on Untill she marry Or my son Richard Comes to Twenty one years of age which shall "first happen and if she shall Continue my widow after my said son Richard Comes to Age as aforesaid Then ....
   "unto my said Wife the use of one half of sd plantation as long as she then shall Continue my Widow and one Quarter
   ".... Unto my son Joseph; And the other Quarter of said plantation Unto my son Richard for so long time as their "Mother shall live or Remains Unmarryed ....";
   "that my son Joseph Six Years Hence pay Unto my Daughter "Inocent five pounds and so Every year after for three years more five pound a year Untill he pay her Twenty pounds In "all money at Eight shillings per ounce, And if he or his heirs .... Default In all or any part of the said payments "then .. my sd Daughter Inocent her heirs .... Into the Lands of the said Joseph to Enter and the sd Land "to hold Untill she be fully paid all or the Remaining part of the Legacy .... out of the Profits of his said Part "of the Land ...."
   "That my son Richard In one Year after he Comes to age pay unto my sd Daughter Innocent "five pounds, and the year following five pounds more, And the year following five pounds Unto my Daughter Phebe and "the year after that five pounds more Unto my said Daughter Phebe, And if he or his heirs .... shall .... "Default in all or any part or parts of said payments, Then .... my faid Daughters their heirs .... or "Either of them their heirs .... Into the Lands hereby bequeathed Unto the said Richard to Enter and the same "to hold or Either of them .... According as Default hath been made Untill they or she be fully paid all or the "remaining part .... of said Legacys out of the Profits of said Land that shall fall to said Richards part ...."
   "Unto my son Joseph Borden his heirs .... after the Marriage or Death of his Mother (whether before or after my "son Richard Comes to Age) The one half of my Plantation to be Equally Divided In Quantity and Quality ...."
   "Unto my son Richard Borden his heirs .... After the Marriage or Death of his Mother (which shall firft happen "before or after he Comes to age) The other half of my plantation to be Equally Divided In Quantity and Quality ...."
  "Unto my five other Daughters (Viz) Rebeckah, Abigaill, Mary, Hellen, and Ann a shilling a Piece money at Eight Shillings p ounce as all the above Legacys are to be ....";
  "after all .... Debts are paid and the Debt of the Loan "office Discharged, .... Unto my Wife (Instead of her Dower ....) the Ufe of the Remaining part of my "Moveable Eftate During her life and at her Death to be Dispofed amongft my Chilldren as she shall think fitt."
   Appoints "my Loveing Friends James Lowry and Robert Lawrence Executors ...."

   Wits.: JAMES BORDEN, Richard Horsfull, William Lawrie, Thomas Lawrie. Affirmation of Executrix, Mary Borden, "Relict of James Borden," "being one of the people called Quakers"; before Samuel Bustill, D. Surrogate, Feb. 22, 1730, at Burlington."." Image.


Mary Lawton

1Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F8Q4-GFX. Image.

2Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F83F-XB3. Image.

3New Jersey, Monmouth County. Colonial Wills 1731-1735, http://files.usgwarchives.net/nj/monmouth/wills/colwills11.txt. "BORDEN, JAMES of the Township of Freehold, Mon. Co., yeoman, "Being very Sick and Weak in Body." Dated Dec. 23, 1727. Proved by oath of Richard Horsfull and William Lawrie, two of the wits., that the other wit., Thomas Lawrie, signed in their presence; before Samuel Bustill, D. Surrogate, Feb. 22, 1730, at Burlington.

Gives: "Unto my Loveing Wife Mary (With the Legacy and Bequeft hereafter Mentioned) Instead of her Dower the "Ufe of the Plantation I now dwell on Untill she marry Or my son Richard Comes to Twenty one years of age which shall "firft happen and if she shall Continue my widow after my said son Richard Comes to Age as aforesaid
Then .... "unto my said Wife the ufe of one half of sd plantation as long as she then shall Continue my Widow and one Quarter ".... Unto my son Joseph; And the other Quarter of said plantation Unto my son Richard for so long time as their "Mother shall live or Remains Unmarryed ...."; "that my son Joseph Six Years Hence pay Unto my Daughter "Inocent five pounds and so Every year after for three years more five pound a year Untill he pay her Twenty pounds In "all money at Eight shillings per ounce, And if he or his heirs .... Default In all or any part of the said payments "then .. my sd Daughter Inocent her heirs .... Into the Lands of the said Joseph to Enter and the sd Land "to hold Untill she be fully paid all or the Remaining part of the Legacy .... out of the Profits of his said Part "of the Land ...."

"That my son Richard In one Year after he Comes to age pay unto my sd Daughter Innocent "five pounds, and the year following five pounds more, And the year following five pounds Unto my Daughter Phebe and "the year after that five pounds more Unto my said Daughter Phebe, And if he or his heirs .... shall .... "Default in all or any part or parts of said payments, Then .... my faid Daughters their heirs .... or "Either of them their heirs .... Into the Lands hereby bequeathed Unto the said Richard to Enter and the same "to hold or Either of them .... According as Default hath been made Untill they or she be fully paid all or the "remaining part .... of said Legacys out of the Profits of said Land that shall fall to said Richards part ...." "Unto my son Joseph Borden his heirs .... after the Marriage or Death of his Mother (whether before or after my "son Richard Comes to Age) The one half of my Plantation to be Equally Divided In Quantity and Quality ...." "Unto my son Richard Borden his heirs .... After the Marriage or Death of his Mother (which shall firft happen "before or after he Comes to age) The other half of my plantation to be Equally Divided In Quantity and Quality ...." "Unto my five other Daughters (Viz) Rebeckah, Abigaill, Mary, Hellen, and Ann a shilling a Piece money at Eight Shillings p ounce as all the above Legacys are to be ...."; "after all .... Debts are paid and the Debt of the Loan "office Discharged, .... Unto my Wife (Instead of her Dower ....) the Ufe of the Remaining part of my "Moveable Eftate During her life and at her Death to be Dispofed amongft my Chilldren as she shall think fitt."

Appoints "my Loveing Friends James Lowry and Robert Lawrence Executors ...."

Wits.:                                              JAMES BORDEN      

Richard Horsfull      William Lawrie      Thomas Lawrie

Affirmation of Executrix, Mary Borden, "Relict of James Borden," "being one of the people called Quakers"; before Samuel Bustill, D. Surrogate, Feb. 22, 1730, at Burlington." Image.


Richard Borden

1New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670 - 1817, Volume XXXII, Abstracts of Wills, 1751-1760. "1751, Apr. 5. Borden, Richard, of Evesham, Burlington Co., yeoman; will of. Wife, Mary. Children-Joseph, Jonathan, James, Benjamin, Hannah Coxe, Amey Tindal, Mary Toy and Anne. Brother, Samuel Borden to be maintained during his life. Real and personal estate. Executors the wife, son James and son-in-law, James Toy. Witnesses: John Huestis, Joseph Huestis, John Green. Proved May 4, 1751. Burl. Wills, 4787 C."

2New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670 - 1817. Image.


Mary Worthley

1New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670 - 1817, Volume XXXII, Abstracts of Wills, 1751-1760. "1751, Apr. 5. Borden, Richard, of Evesham, Burlington Co., yeoman; will of. Wife, Mary. Children-Joseph, Jonathan, James, Benjamin, Hannah Coxe, Amey Tindal, Mary Toy and Anne. Brother, Samuel Borden to be maintained during his life. Real and personal estate. Executors the wife, son James and son-in-law, James Toy. Witnesses: John Huestis, Joseph Huestis, John Green. Proved May 4, 1751. Burl. Wills, 4787 C."


Reverend James Grover

1Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 250-251, 253, 974 D2. "
1667 and 1668. He was the first Town Clerk, of Middletown, N. J.
1668. He was one of the founders of the Baptist Church, at Middletown, N. J.
1668, Oct. 28-Nov. 1. He was one of the repudiated Deputies, of Middletown, and Shrewsbury, to the First General Assembly, held at Elizabethtown, N. J.
1673. As a millwright, he was employed by Lord Lovelace, Governor of New York, in the erection of a water mill upon Staten Island.
1673, Aug. 8. [1674] He was chosen, by Middletown, with John Bowne, a Commissioner, to consult upon terms of surrender, with the Dutch, at Fort Orange, who had recently reentered the province.

  In addition to his business of a millwright, he conducted an inn:
  By Cap" Phillip Carterett Esqr Gouernor of the prouince of New Jarsey.
These are to permit and Lycence James Grouer of Nauesinck to keep an ordinary or victualing howse for the Entertaynment and aComodation of all strangers and passengers Wth Lodging and prouisions, and to retaile all manner of strong drink and liquours to all persons Whatsoeuer Excepting the Indians, Allwayes prouided that he keeps good orders in his hows, and not Exceed the rates that are or shall be appointed Vpon all sorts of drink and Liqr. that shall be so Vented in Victualling howses by Way of retaile, hereby prohibiting all other prsons to Sell or Vent by Way of retaile any strong drink or Liqr to be dronck or spent Wthin their dwelling howses Without a Lycence first obtayned from me Vpon the penaltie of paying fiue pounds Starling to the Vse of the publick for their Contempt, this Lycense to Continue for one Whole Yeare from the day of the date hereof, and to be Continued from Yeare to Yeare by the Secretary Vnless there be Just Cause of Exceptions to the Contrary. Giuen Vndr my hand and Seale of the prouince the 10th day of July 1667 and in the 19th Yeare of the Raigne of our Souern Lord Charles the Second, King of England Scotland france and Ireland defendr of the faith &c. East Jersey Deeds, Lib. 3, p. 11.
   1667-8, Feb. 27. James Grover, of "Midleten upon Navesink," subscribed to the "Oath of Alegeance." New Jersey Archives, Vol. 1, p. 51.
  James Grover was also a successful aspirant for military and judicial honors: 1672, June 13. Commission granted to "Mr . James Grover," to be Lieutenant of a Foot Company, in Middletown. Trenton Deeds, Lib. 3, p. 42.

  1677, Mch. 12. James Grover and Joseph Parker, Justices of Peace, were commissioned to form part of the County Court of Middletown and Shrewsbury. Capt. John Bound to be President, and Richard Gibbons and Jonathan Holmes to be assistants.
Trenton Deeds, Lib. 3, p. 139.
  1678, Sept. 3 and 4. James Grover sat, as a Justice of the Peace, at a Court held at Shrewsbury." Image.

2Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 254 & 255. "
Lands of James Grover, SENIOR.
  The first recorded land transaction in which James Grover took part is dated the 24th of August 1674, and is to be found on page 68 of Liber 1st of East Jersey Deeds in the office of the Secretary of State. At that time Matappeas, Tawapung, and Seapeckne, "Chief Sachems of Toponemese" sold to John Bowne, Richard Hartshorne and j James Grover, of "Middleton In After Cull," "in consideration of sundry species of Trading goods," " a certain tract of land" on tbe Navesink river.
  On the 30th of June 1676, Gov. Carteret granted to James Grover for a yearly rent of one half penny per acre a tract of three hundred and thirty acres called "Grover's Inheritance," on Swimming river, in Middletown; also a triangular tract of two hundred acres, also called Grover's Inheritance, on the Ramanesse Creek in Middletown; also another triangular tract of twenty-five acres, in Middletown on Navesinks Bay, and six acres of swamp at the head of Jumping river Eight months later (2 March 1677) James Grover exchanged the third parcel of this grant described as meadow lying on Conesconke, with his neighbor Richard Hartshorne for sixteen acres "in Midleton Meadows," and on the 22d of Dec. 1685, shortly before his death, he gave the remaining three tracts to his son Joseph.
  The third recorded grant of land to James Grover is from Gov. Carteret, for five hundred and seventeen acres in Middletown, and is dated 20 June 1677. It was known as "Grover's New Invention" and the 18th of Nov. 1685, shortly previous to his death, he gave one hundred and ninety seven acres of this grant to his son SAFETY.

  IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN, I JAMES GROVER, SENR. , of Middletowne, in the County of Monmouth, in New East Jarsey, being Sencible of my Mortallity and at present of perfect and sound mind and memory, thankes be to Allmighty God, Doe make, Constitute, Ordaine and declare this my last Will and Testament in Manner & forme following, Revoakeing and Annulling, by these presents, all and every Testament and Testaments, Will and Wills heretofore by me made and declared, Either by word or writeing, and this to be taken only for my last Will and Testament, and none other.
  Imps. I Bequeath my Soule to Allmighty God that gaue it, and my body to the Earth, to be buried in Decent Manner and in such place as my Executrs hereafter named shall appoint.—And as for such Temporall Estate as it hath pleased God to bestow uppon me, I doe Giue, Order and dispose of the Same in manner and forme following, (that is to Say) — ffirst I Will that all those debts and Duties as I owe in Right or Conscience to any man whatsoever, shall be well and truely contented and paid, in convenient time after my Decease, by my Executrs. hereafter Named.
  Item I Giue and Bequeath and my Will is that my Mansion house, my Mill with all that belongs thereto, and all my land lying on the N. E. Side of the Mill Creek, togather with all my Meadow land adjoyning or Elce where, shall be divided into three Equall parts, One third I giue to my Son, James Grover, One third to my Son-in-law, Benjamin Borden, for the Sake of his Wife, my Daughter Abigail, and the other third part I giue to my Son-in-Law, Richard Gardiner, for the Sake of my Daughter, Hannah his Wife, with all the privelidges & appurtenances thereunto belonging, to them and to theire Heires, Executrs, Administratrs. or Assignes.
  Item All the rest of my Estate, Moveable and immoveable, both household stuffe, tooles, Implements, Cattle, horses, Swine, and everything elce that is mine, my will is that after the decease of me and my Wife, it shall be Equally devided between my fiue Children, James, Joseph, Safety, Abigail and Hannah.
  Item My Will is that after my Decease, all my Estate, both Reall & personall, shall be & Remaine in the possession of my Deare Wife, Rebecca, for her Support & Maintenance, so long as she shall liue or remaine a Widdow, and afterwards to be disposed of as above Specified.
  Lastly—I doe Ordaine and Appoint my Son, James Grover, and my Son-in-Law, Richard Gardiner, to be my Executrs. and none other, after my decease, to see this my Will & Testament performed.
   In Wittnesse whereof I haue hereunto Set my hand & fixed my Seale, this ffirst day of December, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Six hundred Eighty & five.
JAMES GROVER, SEN. [Seal]
Signed & Sealed and declared to be the last Will & Testament of James Grover, in presence of us
RICHARD HARTSHORNE
THO. WEBLEY
  The will was proved Jan. 28,1685, by the witnesses, Richard Hartshorne and Tho. Webley, before John Throckmorton." Image.

3Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 263. "
1714, Aug. 26. James Grover, of Middletown, wheelwright, sold to William Winter, cordwainer, of the same place, all his interest in a tract of land, lying on the North West side of Middle run, and on the North East side of the Mill Creek, devised by his father, James Grover, to his son, James Grover, and his son-in-law, Benjamin Borden, for the sake of his daughter, Abigail Borden, and son-in-law, Richard Gardiner, for the sake of his daughter, Hannah; also land, at Shoal Harbor; also "the Housings, Mill stones and all the Iron work, with all the utensils belonging to the old mill, with all the Premises, Liberties, Priviledges, and Appurtenances, belonging to the said Land, on the north west side of the middle run," etc." Source Image. Citation Image.

4George Braden Roberts, Genealogy of Joseph Peck and some related families, State College, Pennsylvania: c1955, pages 167-168, FHL 929.273 P334r. "The information regarding the Grover Family was obtained from Hist. and Geneal. Miscellany by Stillwell, pp. 276-278, Vol. u, Grovers of Monmouth County, N. J.

James Grover, the founder of the MonmouthCounty families was one of those brave adventurous spirits, of whose history, prior to coming to Gravesend, Long Island, at its first settlement, we know little or nothing. The first positive knowledge of James Grover is the granting to him, Feb. 20, l646 (Nov. l2, l646, says T. G. Bergen, Esq.) in the first division of Gravesend lands, a house, lot and farm of 20 acres.

On March 9, l655, with James Hubbard and George Baxter, he proclaimed the republic of England and repudiated the Dutch Government, at Gravesend, but managed to escape when they were arrested on a charge of treason, although his hands hoisted the English flag there. That was an important historical event and was of great value to the Colonies later. He went to Boston thence to England, but, in 1657 reappeared at Gravesend, bringing with him a letter from the Proctor, Oliver Cromwell, addressed to the English inhabitants of Long Island, which he afterward presented to the Magistrates of Gravesend "to be opened and read" but the Director Stuyvesant had been informed of it, and he, August 2h, 1657, addressed a letter to the "Honorable, Dear Faithful, the Schont and Magistrates of the Village of Gravesend" countermanding the substance of said letter and requesting that Grover and his letter be sent to Peter Stuyvesant, Director and Council of New Netherlands. James Grover considered it unwise to appear before Stuyvesant and prudently made his escape, leaving the letter with the Magistrates.

James Grover's farm was on the S-E portion of the town, and, in 1657, he had six acres under cultivation. He must have been protected by the Magistrates and people of Gravesend, although he was an open enemy to the Dutch Government.

About this time (1663) some of the people of Gravesend decided to emigrate, and a number of them went in search of a place to settle. Stuyvesant heard of it and sent a vessel in persuit of the party. The party had an eventful trip but was not overtaken.

l666-7 James Grover sold his farm in Gravesend, and went to East Jersey, where he was one of the first settlers in Middletown where, December 30, l667, he had a town lot assigned to him and was deputed to "survey the land that is to be laid out in lots". 1668, James Grover was town clerk of Middletown and December l6, l668, he made an agreement with the Town to lay out the meadows into town lots for one pound of merchantable blade tobacco for each acre.

Jan. 4, 1669, James Grover recorded his "earmark" for his cattle running at large.

Dec. 25, 1669, made an agreement with the Town of Middletown, in legal Town Meeting to operate his flour mill in accordance with certain specifications (not shown here).

1667-8, he was the first Town Clerk of Middletown.

1668, he was one of the founders of the Babtist Church of Middletown.

1673, he was millwright employed by Governor Lovelace of New York in the erection of a mill on Staten Island.

1673 (August 8, 1674), he was chosen as the Comissioner to consult upon terms of surrender, with the Dutch at Fort Orange.

1667-8, Feb. 27. James Grover of Middletown subscribed to the "Oath of Allegeance".

1672. Comission granted to Mr. James Grover to be Lieutenant of a foot company in Middletown.

1675, March 13. A Commission granted for the County Court of Middletown and Shrewsbury, at which James Grover was to be an associate.

1677, March 12. James Grover appointed Justice of the Peace, at Court held in Shrewsbury.

Lands of James Grover
The first recorded land transaction in which James Grover took part is dated August 2h, 1674, and is to be found on page 68 of Liber 1st of East Jersey Deeds in the Office of the Secretary of State. At that time Matappeas, Tawapung, and Seapeckne, "Chief Sachems of Toponemese" sold to John Bowne, Richard Hawthorne and James Grover, of "Midd1etown in After Cull", "In consideration of sundry species of trading goods", a certain tract of land on Navesink River.

On June 30, 1675, Governor Carteret granted to James Grover for a yearly rent of one-half penny per acre a tract of 330 acres called "Grover's Inheritance", on Swimming River, in Middletown; also a triangular tract of 200 acres, also called "Grover's Inheritance", on Ramanesse Creek in Middletown; also another triangular tract of 25 acres in Middletownon Navesink's Bay, and six acres of swampland at the head of Jumping River.

The third recorded grant of land to James Grover is from Governor Carteret, for 517 acres in Middletown, and is dated June 20, 1677. It was known as "Grover's New Invention". (This adds up to 1072 acres owned by James Grover in addition to that tract of unknown acreage purchased from the Indians)." Source Image. Citation Image.

5George Braden Roberts, Genealogy of Joseph Peck and some related families, pages 169 - Will. "Will of James Grover. Ref: Liber I, p. 68, East Jersey Deeds.

"In the name of God AMEN,I James Grover, Senr. of Middletown, County of Monmouth,in East Jersey, being sencible of my Mortality and the present of perfect and sound mind --- Imps. I bequeath my soul to Almighty Godthat gave it, and mybody to the Earth, etc. --- And as for my Temporal Estate as it has blessed God to bestow upon me, I doe Give, Order and Dispose of the same in manner and forme following (that is to say) -first I will that all those debts and Duties as I owe in Right or conscience to any man whatsoever, shall be well and truly contented and paid, in convenient time after my Demise, by my Execut(ers) hereinafter named.

Item I give and bequeath and my will is that my Mansion house, my Mill with that belongs thereto, and all my land lying on the N-E side of Mill Creek, together with all my Meadowland adjoining or Elcewhere, shall be divided into three equal parts, one third I give to my son James Grover, one third to my son-in-law Benjamin Borden, for sake of his wife, my daughter Abigail, and the other third part to my son-in-law, Richard Gardiner for the sake of my daughter Hannah, his wife with all the privilidges & appurtenances thereto belonging, to them and their Heirs Execut(rs), Administrat(rs), or assignes.

Item all the rest of myEstate, Mouableor Imouable, both household and stuffe, tools, implements - cattle, horses, swine and everything elce that is mine, my will is that after decease of me and my wife, it shall be equally divided between my five children, James, Joseph, Safety, Abigail and Hannah.

Item My will is that after my decease, all my Estate, both Real and Personal shall be and Remains in the possession of my Deare Wife Rebecca for her Support and Maintenance as long as she shall live or remain a widow, and afterward to be disposed of as specified.

Lastly I doe Ordain and Appoint my son James Grover and my son-in-law Richard Gardiner to be myExecut(rs), and none other after my decease, to see this Will and Testament performed. In witness whereof I have hereunto set myhand and fixed my seale, this lst day of Dec. in the year of Our Lord l685.

This will was proved Jan. 28, 1685/6.
Witnesses: Richard Hartshorne and Tho. Webly, before John Throckmorton." Source Image. Citation Image.

6Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), page 40, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "JAMES GROVER (d. 1685/6) went to Gravesend, L. I. probably from New England before Feb. 20, 1646. The first reference to JAMES GROVER is of that date in the first division of Gravesend lands in vhich he received a house, a lot, and a farm of twenty acres. March 21, 1666/7, JAMES GROVER, Gent, sold his farm at Gravesend to Thomas Delavail. (Stillwell, John W.: Historical and Genealogical Miscellany. Vol. III, New York, 1914.

Political and land activities discussed at length in source.

JAMES GROVER was a grantee of Monmouth, N, J., I663. Lieutenant, First Company of Militia in New Jersey, Dec. 1, I663. Was appointed Burgess for Middletown in First General Assembly, 1668. Member of Court at Portland Point, July l6, I67O. Deputy to treat with Admirals and Commanders of Fleet belonging to States-General, I673. Justice of Peace at Shrewsbury, Sept. 6,1676: also at Middletown, I676. Pennsylvania C. D. A. Records.

He was chosen lieutenant, June 5, 1672. In I667-I668 he was the first town clerk of Middletown, and in 1672 he still held this position. In 1668 he was one of the founders of the Baptist Church of Middletown which was the first Baptist Church in New Jersey. - Stillwell, J. W.: Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. II , New York, 1906, p. 170.

June 13, I672. Commission granted to Mr. JAMES GROVER to be Lieutenant of a Foot Company, Middletown. Trenton Deeds, Lib.3, p. 42. Stillwell, J. W., ojj. cit., Vol. III, p. 256.

From the Old Town Book, Old Middletown, N. J., Dec. 30, 1667-Aug. 1694: Dec. 30, 1667. JAMES GROVER,lots 16 and 36; "in the mountany fields" , JAMES GROVER, Sr., lot 15: James Grover, Jr., lot 25. JAMES GROVER, Sr., Town Clearke.

August 3, 1673, p. 23. JAMES GROVER and John Bowne chosen Deputies to treat with the Admirals of the Fleet.

Sept. 12, I673. JAMES GROVER, Sr., and Jonathon Holmes presented for place of Captain; latter established.

JAMES GROVER, one of the twelve Monmouth patentees, built the first iron-works in New Jersey. Their location was at Tinton Falls. They were sold, with a large tract of adjacent land, to Colonel Lewis Morris, the eldee, in I676. — William Goulding, like JAMES GROVER, was one of the Massachusetts Bay Baptists, who were persecuted and banished from that colony on account of their religion.

"The first ironworks established in the Province of New Jersey was erected by or for JAMES GROVER. It is not definitely known whether GROVER attempted to build this furnace before Henry Leonard arrived from England, but is an established fact that it was operated under the Leonards after 1674. ...JAMES GROVER was a resident of Gravesend, Long Island and with a number of associates secured in I655, a patent from Governor Nicholas for the so-called "Monmouth Tract", which grant was later confirmed by Governor Carteret, minus certain privileges contained in the original document. GROVER soon became town miller under agreement to keep the mill in good repair, and to grind the corn of the inhabitants of Middletown. The corn mill ... had been built about eighteen months before GROVER took it over, as i s indicated by a deed dated Dec. 25. 1669, in which "the mill damme" and pond at Swimming River are mentioned. It is quite likely that the first ironworks used the same water power. Some authorities try to place its location on the Shrewsbury River, while others claim it was between Hope River (or Brook) and Darling River, and still others fix its site at Tinton Falls. A deed dated June 1, 1701, calls for land in Middletown between Burden' Brook and Jumping Brook and adjoining the "iron works". " — Boyer, C. S.: Early Forges and Furnaces in New Jersey, Philadelphia, 1931, p. I96.

Whitehead, W. A.: East Jersey under the Proprietary Governments. New York, 1875, p. 58. - On the seventh of April, 1668. Governor Carteret issued his proclamation for an assembly to be held at Elizabethtovn. The first assembly in the history of New Jersey commenced its session on the 26th, and closed on the 30th of May. This was fifteen years in advance of the first assmbly in New York, and without doubt the existence of an assembly in New Jersey had no little weight in bringing about the concession of one to the people in the adjoining province. It was composed of the following Burgesses: For Bergen, Gaspar Steinmetts and Baltahazar Bayard; for Newark on the Pishawack River, Captain Robert Treat and Samuel Swarne (or Swain); for Elizabethtown, John Ogden, Sr., and John Brackett; for Woodbridge, John Bishop and Robert Dennis; for Middletown, JAMES GROVER and John Bowne; and the last named consented also to represent Shrewsbury.

Stillwell, J . E.: Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. Ill,p.249. Oct. 28 -Nov.l, 1668. He was one of the repudiated Deputies, of Middletown and Shrewsbury, to the first General Assembly, held at Elizabethtown, N. J.. 1673. As a millwright, he was employed by Lord Lovelace, Governor of New York, in the erection of a water mill upon Staten Island. Aug. 8, I673 (1674). He was chosen by Middletown, with John Bowne, a commissioner to consult upom terms of surrender with the Dutch, at Fort Orange, who had recently entered the province. July 10, I667. He was licsenced to conduct an inn.

Ibid., p. 256. Oct. 5, 1686. "To expenseat the funeral of the widow of JAMES GROVER, O5/0O/OO. Page 257. Dec. 28, 1685. "To so much Expended for funeral charges" (for JAMES GROVER).O5/IO/OO. Oct. 5, I686. "To so much expended in maintaineing the widdow," I5/OO/OO.

JAMES GROVER'S will was dated Dec. 1, 1685 and was proved Jan. 28, I685/6. His widow, REBECCA, who survived him, died the following October." Source Image. Citation Image.

7England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JM12-C9W. "Name: James Grover
Gender: Male
Christening Date: 08 Nov 1607
Christening Date (Original): 08 NOV 1607
Christening Place: CHESHAM,BUCKINGHAM,ENGLAND
Father's Name: James Grover
Mother's Name: Anne
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: P02080-1
System Origin: England-ODM
GS Film number: 0924812 IT 2
Reference ID:

"England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JM12-C9W : 30 December 2014, James Grover in entry for James Grover, 08 Nov 1607); citing CHESHAM,BUCKINGHAM,ENGLAND, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 0924812 IT 2." Image.

8England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JM12-C9Q. Image.

9FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=123076932. "[TM - This date of birth on FindaGrave is not proven from any source documentation.]
James GROVER, born 11 Jul 1611 in Chesham, Buckinghamshire, England, is recorded on 27 Dec 1642 - "James Grover, apprenticed servant to James Hubbard, by consignation of Mathew Bancke, apprenticed himself to Edward Tomlins of Lynn, Massachusetts to learn the carpenter's trade."
("Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33).

James was apparently a devout Baptist and one of the followers of Lady Deborah Moody who founded Gravesend in 1645 after she was expelled out of Salem, Masschusetts for her beliefs on adult baptism, and did not conform to the Purtain faith. 10 Dec 1645 Lady Moody, with her associates were granted a patent by the Dutch Director Kieft of New Amsterdam. 20 Feb 1646 James Grover was granted a house, lot, and a farm of 20 acres in the first division of Gravesend lands, which at that time was a small settlement of about 100 colonists.

The date is unknown when James married Rebecca Cheeseman, but their first child, Abigail, was born 27 Sep 1654. On 9 Mar 1654/55 James Grover, George Baxter, and James Hubbard, preferring English to Dutch rule, hoisted the English flag at Gravesend, declaring themselves subjects of the Republic of England. James was sent by the English colonists of Long Island on a mission to see Cromwell in England about their situation, and returned to Gravesend in 1657, bringing with him a letter from the Proctor, Oliver Cromwell, addressed to the English inhabitants of Long Island, which he afterward presented to the Magistrates of Gravesend "to be opened and read". Peter Stuyvesant, the Director General of New Amsterdam had been informed of Cromwell's letter, and ordered the arrest of James Grover. James considered it unwise to appear before Stuyvesant and prudently made his escape, leaving the letter with the Magistrates. 21 Mar 1666/67 James sold his farm in Gravesend to Thomas Devall.

James Grover, on 8 Apr 1665, became one of the original Monmouth County Patentees in New Jersey when he received lot #16 in Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey. On 27 Feb 1667/68 James subscribed to the Oath of Allegiance. He became the first town clerk of Middletown, and was one of the founders of the Baptist Church at Middletown. 16 Dec 1668 made an agreement with the town to lay out the meadows into town lots for one pound of merchantable blade tobacco for each acre. 4 Jan 1669 made an agreement with the Town of Middletown, in legal Town Meeting to operate his flour mill in accordance with certain specifications. During the early 1670's James Grover discovered bog-iron on his property and in order to assist in financing this project he mortgaged the property to Cornelius Steenwyck of New York. Tinton Falls Iron Works, located near Shrewsbury, was the earliest iron works in New Jersey. 13 Jun 1672 he was made a lieutenant in the Middletown Company of New Jersey Militia, and as a deputy to treat (discuss terms of an agreement or settlement) with the admirals and commanders of the fleet of the States-General in 1673. 30 Jun 1675 Governor Carteret granted to James Grover for a yearly rent of one-half penny per acre a tract of 330 acres called "Grover's Inheritance", on Swimming River in Middletown; also a triangular tract of 200 acres also called "Grover's Inheritance", on Ramanesse Creek; as well as another triangular tract of 25 acres on Navesink's Bay, and six acres of swamp land at the head of Jumping River. 29 Dec 1675 when Grover ran out of capital, he sold one-half interest of his ironworks to Colonel Lewis Morris of Morrisiana, New York. Morris later took over Steenwyck's mortgage and thus retained a three quarter interest in the works. 12 Mar 1677 the third recorded grant of land to James Grover from Governor Carteret, for 517 acres in Middletown. It was known as "Grover's New Invention".

James Grover's will was signed 1 Dec 1685, and proven by 28 Jan 1686. Rebecca died shortly thereafter, in October 1686.

There is a certain amount of CONFUSION regarding James' parents and his date of birth. One James Grover was christened 8 Nov 1607 in Chesham; another baptized 30 Aug 1623. Some researchers show James also as the son of James Grover and Ann Eames; still others as the son of Thomas Grover and Rebecca Gardiner.

SOURCES:
("This Old Monmouth of Ours", pg. 180, by William S. Hornor)
("Grover of Monmouth County" by John E. Stillwell in "Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, New York, NY" Vol. 3 1914, pgs. 246-278)
("The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy", Vol. 6, 1937, pgs. 690, 778-9, by Frederick A. Virkus)." Image.


Rebecca Cheeseman

1England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N59N-SBV. "Name: Rebecca Cheesman
Gender: Female
Christening Date: 01 May 1630
Christening Place: BEESTON SAINT LAWRENCE,NORFOLK,ENGLAND
Mother's Name: Margarett Cheesman
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C04407-1
System Origin: England-ODM
GS Film number: 894716

Citing this Record:
"England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N59N-SBJ : 6 December 2014), Rebecca Cheesman, 01 May 1630; citing BEESTON SAINT LAWRENCE,NORFOLK,ENGLAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 894,716." Image.

2FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=123077000. "Rebecca and James were married in England and they were the parents of five children:

James/abt 1650 m. Alice
Abigail/1653 (Mrs Benjamin Fowle Borden)
Joseph/1656 m. Hannah Lawrence
Safety/1658 m. Mercy
Hannah/1667 (Mrs William Winter); 2 (Mrs Richard Gardiner)

Her parents were William Cheeseman and Martha Dorset of England; they died in Middletown, Monmouth Co, NJ." Image.

3Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 250-251, 253, 974 D2. "
1667 and 1668. He was the first Town Clerk, of Middletown, N. J.
1668. He was one of the founders of the Baptist Church, at Middletown, N. J.
1668, Oct. 28-Nov. 1. He was one of the repudiated Deputies, of Middletown, and Shrewsbury, to the First General Assembly, held at Elizabethtown, N. J.
1673. As a millwright, he was employed by Lord Lovelace, Governor of New York, in the erection of a water mill upon Staten Island.
1673, Aug. 8. [1674] He was chosen, by Middletown, with John Bowne, a Commissioner, to consult upon terms of surrender, with the Dutch, at Fort Orange, who had recently reentered the province.

  In addition to his business of a millwright, he conducted an inn:
  By Cap" Phillip Carterett Esqr Gouernor of the prouince of New Jarsey.
These are to permit and Lycence James Grouer of Nauesinck to keep an ordinary or victualing howse for the Entertaynment and aComodation of all strangers and passengers Wth Lodging and prouisions, and to retaile all manner of strong drink and liquours to all persons Whatsoeuer Excepting the Indians, Allwayes prouided that he keeps good orders in his hows, and not Exceed the rates that are or shall be appointed Vpon all sorts of drink and Liqr. that shall be so Vented in Victualling howses by Way of retaile, hereby prohibiting all other prsons to Sell or Vent by Way of retaile any strong drink or Liqr to be dronck or spent Wthin their dwelling howses Without a Lycence first obtayned from me Vpon the penaltie of paying fiue pounds Starling to the Vse of the publick for their Contempt, this Lycense to Continue for one Whole Yeare from the day of the date hereof, and to be Continued from Yeare to Yeare by the Secretary Vnless there be Just Cause of Exceptions to the Contrary. Giuen Vndr my hand and Seale of the prouince the 10th day of July 1667 and in the 19th Yeare of the Raigne of our Souern Lord Charles the Second, King of England Scotland france and Ireland defendr of the faith &c. East Jersey Deeds, Lib. 3, p. 11.
   1667-8, Feb. 27. James Grover, of "Midleten upon Navesink," subscribed to the "Oath of Alegeance." New Jersey Archives, Vol. 1, p. 51.
  James Grover was also a successful aspirant for military and judicial honors: 1672, June 13. Commission granted to "Mr . James Grover," to be Lieutenant of a Foot Company, in Middletown. Trenton Deeds, Lib. 3, p. 42.

  1677, Mch. 12. James Grover and Joseph Parker, Justices of Peace, were commissioned to form part of the County Court of Middletown and Shrewsbury. Capt. John Bound to be President, and Richard Gibbons and Jonathan Holmes to be assistants.
Trenton Deeds, Lib. 3, p. 139.
  1678, Sept. 3 and 4. James Grover sat, as a Justice of the Peace, at a Court held at Shrewsbury." Image.

4Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 254 & 255. "
Lands of James Grover, SENIOR.
  The first recorded land transaction in which James Grover took part is dated the 24th of August 1674, and is to be found on page 68 of Liber 1st of East Jersey Deeds in the office of the Secretary of State. At that time Matappeas, Tawapung, and Seapeckne, "Chief Sachems of Toponemese" sold to John Bowne, Richard Hartshorne and j James Grover, of "Middleton In After Cull," "in consideration of sundry species of Trading goods," " a certain tract of land" on tbe Navesink river.
  On the 30th of June 1676, Gov. Carteret granted to James Grover for a yearly rent of one half penny per acre a tract of three hundred and thirty acres called "Grover's Inheritance," on Swimming river, in Middletown; also a triangular tract of two hundred acres, also called Grover's Inheritance, on the Ramanesse Creek in Middletown; also another triangular tract of twenty-five acres, in Middletown on Navesinks Bay, and six acres of swamp at the head of Jumping river Eight months later (2 March 1677) James Grover exchanged the third parcel of this grant described as meadow lying on Conesconke, with his neighbor Richard Hartshorne for sixteen acres "in Midleton Meadows," and on the 22d of Dec. 1685, shortly before his death, he gave the remaining three tracts to his son Joseph.
  The third recorded grant of land to James Grover is from Gov. Carteret, for five hundred and seventeen acres in Middletown, and is dated 20 June 1677. It was known as "Grover's New Invention" and the 18th of Nov. 1685, shortly previous to his death, he gave one hundred and ninety seven acres of this grant to his son SAFETY.

  IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN, I JAMES GROVER, SENR. , of Middletowne, in the County of Monmouth, in New East Jarsey, being Sencible of my Mortallity and at present of perfect and sound mind and memory, thankes be to Allmighty God, Doe make, Constitute, Ordaine and declare this my last Will and Testament in Manner & forme following, Revoakeing and Annulling, by these presents, all and every Testament and Testaments, Will and Wills heretofore by me made and declared, Either by word or writeing, and this to be taken only for my last Will and Testament, and none other.
  Imps. I Bequeath my Soule to Allmighty God that gaue it, and my body to the Earth, to be buried in Decent Manner and in such place as my Executrs hereafter named shall appoint.—And as for such Temporall Estate as it hath pleased God to bestow uppon me, I doe Giue, Order and dispose of the Same in manner and forme following, (that is to Say) — ffirst I Will that all those debts and Duties as I owe in Right or Conscience to any man whatsoever, shall be well and truely contented and paid, in convenient time after my Decease, by my Executrs. hereafter Named.
  Item I Giue and Bequeath and my Will is that my Mansion house, my Mill with all that belongs thereto, and all my land lying on the N. E. Side of the Mill Creek, togather with all my Meadow land adjoyning or Elce where, shall be divided into three Equall parts, One third I giue to my Son, James Grover, One third to my Son-in-law, Benjamin Borden, for the Sake of his Wife, my Daughter Abigail, and the other third part I giue to my Son-in-Law, Richard Gardiner, for the Sake of my Daughter, Hannah his Wife, with all the privelidges & appurtenances thereunto belonging, to them and to theire Heires, Executrs, Administratrs. or Assignes.
  Item All the rest of my Estate, Moveable and immoveable, both household stuffe, tooles, Implements, Cattle, horses, Swine, and everything elce that is mine, my will is that after the decease of me and my Wife, it shall be Equally devided between my fiue Children, James, Joseph, Safety, Abigail and Hannah.
  Item My Will is that after my Decease, all my Estate, both Reall & personall, shall be & Remaine in the possession of my Deare Wife, Rebecca, for her Support & Maintenance, so long as she shall liue or remaine a Widdow, and afterwards to be disposed of as above Specified.
  Lastly—I doe Ordaine and Appoint my Son, James Grover, and my Son-in-Law, Richard Gardiner, to be my Executrs. and none other, after my decease, to see this my Will & Testament performed.
   In Wittnesse whereof I haue hereunto Set my hand & fixed my Seale, this ffirst day of December, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Six hundred Eighty & five.
JAMES GROVER, SEN. [Seal]
Signed & Sealed and declared to be the last Will & Testament of James Grover, in presence of us
RICHARD HARTSHORNE
THO. WEBLEY
  The will was proved Jan. 28,1685, by the witnesses, Richard Hartshorne and Tho. Webley, before John Throckmorton." Image.

5Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 263. "
1714, Aug. 26. James Grover, of Middletown, wheelwright, sold to William Winter, cordwainer, of the same place, all his interest in a tract of land, lying on the North West side of Middle run, and on the North East side of the Mill Creek, devised by his father, James Grover, to his son, James Grover, and his son-in-law, Benjamin Borden, for the sake of his daughter, Abigail Borden, and son-in-law, Richard Gardiner, for the sake of his daughter, Hannah; also land, at Shoal Harbor; also "the Housings, Mill stones and all the Iron work, with all the utensils belonging to the old mill, with all the Premises, Liberties, Priviledges, and Appurtenances, belonging to the said Land, on the north west side of the middle run," etc." Source Image. Citation Image.

6George Braden Roberts, Genealogy of Joseph Peck and some related families, State College, Pennsylvania: c1955, pages 167-168, FHL 929.273 P334r. "The information regarding the Grover Family was obtained from Hist. and Geneal. Miscellany by Stillwell, pp. 276-278, Vol. u, Grovers of Monmouth County, N. J.

James Grover, the founder of the MonmouthCounty families was one of those brave adventurous spirits, of whose history, prior to coming to Gravesend, Long Island, at its first settlement, we know little or nothing. The first positive knowledge of James Grover is the granting to him, Feb. 20, l646 (Nov. l2, l646, says T. G. Bergen, Esq.) in the first division of Gravesend lands, a house, lot and farm of 20 acres.

On March 9, l655, with James Hubbard and George Baxter, he proclaimed the republic of England and repudiated the Dutch Government, at Gravesend, but managed to escape when they were arrested on a charge of treason, although his hands hoisted the English flag there. That was an important historical event and was of great value to the Colonies later. He went to Boston thence to England, but, in 1657 reappeared at Gravesend, bringing with him a letter from the Proctor, Oliver Cromwell, addressed to the English inhabitants of Long Island, which he afterward presented to the Magistrates of Gravesend "to be opened and read" but the Director Stuyvesant had been informed of it, and he, August 2h, 1657, addressed a letter to the "Honorable, Dear Faithful, the Schont and Magistrates of the Village of Gravesend" countermanding the substance of said letter and requesting that Grover and his letter be sent to Peter Stuyvesant, Director and Council of New Netherlands. James Grover considered it unwise to appear before Stuyvesant and prudently made his escape, leaving the letter with the Magistrates.

James Grover's farm was on the S-E portion of the town, and, in 1657, he had six acres under cultivation. He must have been protected by the Magistrates and people of Gravesend, although he was an open enemy to the Dutch Government.

About this time (1663) some of the people of Gravesend decided to emigrate, and a number of them went in search of a place to settle. Stuyvesant heard of it and sent a vessel in persuit of the party. The party had an eventful trip but was not overtaken.

l666-7 James Grover sold his farm in Gravesend, and went to East Jersey, where he was one of the first settlers in Middletown where, December 30, l667, he had a town lot assigned to him and was deputed to "survey the land that is to be laid out in lots". 1668, James Grover was town clerk of Middletown and December l6, l668, he made an agreement with the Town to lay out the meadows into town lots for one pound of merchantable blade tobacco for each acre.

Jan. 4, 1669, James Grover recorded his "earmark" for his cattle running at large.

Dec. 25, 1669, made an agreement with the Town of Middletown, in legal Town Meeting to operate his flour mill in accordance with certain specifications (not shown here).

1667-8, he was the first Town Clerk of Middletown.

1668, he was one of the founders of the Babtist Church of Middletown.

1673, he was millwright employed by Governor Lovelace of New York in the erection of a mill on Staten Island.

1673 (August 8, 1674), he was chosen as the Comissioner to consult upon terms of surrender, with the Dutch at Fort Orange.

1667-8, Feb. 27. James Grover of Middletown subscribed to the "Oath of Allegeance".

1672. Comission granted to Mr. James Grover to be Lieutenant of a foot company in Middletown.

1675, March 13. A Commission granted for the County Court of Middletown and Shrewsbury, at which James Grover was to be an associate.

1677, March 12. James Grover appointed Justice of the Peace, at Court held in Shrewsbury.

Lands of James Grover
The first recorded land transaction in which James Grover took part is dated August 2h, 1674, and is to be found on page 68 of Liber 1st of East Jersey Deeds in the Office of the Secretary of State. At that time Matappeas, Tawapung, and Seapeckne, "Chief Sachems of Toponemese" sold to John Bowne, Richard Hawthorne and James Grover, of "Midd1etown in After Cull", "In consideration of sundry species of trading goods", a certain tract of land on Navesink River.

On June 30, 1675, Governor Carteret granted to James Grover for a yearly rent of one-half penny per acre a tract of 330 acres called "Grover's Inheritance", on Swimming River, in Middletown; also a triangular tract of 200 acres, also called "Grover's Inheritance", on Ramanesse Creek in Middletown; also another triangular tract of 25 acres in Middletownon Navesink's Bay, and six acres of swampland at the head of Jumping River.

The third recorded grant of land to James Grover is from Governor Carteret, for 517 acres in Middletown, and is dated June 20, 1677. It was known as "Grover's New Invention". (This adds up to 1072 acres owned by James Grover in addition to that tract of unknown acreage purchased from the Indians)." Source Image. Citation Image.

7George Braden Roberts, Genealogy of Joseph Peck and some related families, pages 169 - Will. "Will of James Grover. Ref: Liber I, p. 68, East Jersey Deeds.

"In the name of God AMEN,I James Grover, Senr. of Middletown, County of Monmouth,in East Jersey, being sencible of my Mortality and the present of perfect and sound mind --- Imps. I bequeath my soul to Almighty Godthat gave it, and mybody to the Earth, etc. --- And as for my Temporal Estate as it has blessed God to bestow upon me, I doe Give, Order and Dispose of the same in manner and forme following (that is to say) -first I will that all those debts and Duties as I owe in Right or conscience to any man whatsoever, shall be well and truly contented and paid, in convenient time after my Demise, by my Execut(ers) hereinafter named.

Item I give and bequeath and my will is that my Mansion house, my Mill with that belongs thereto, and all my land lying on the N-E side of Mill Creek, together with all my Meadowland adjoining or Elcewhere, shall be divided into three equal parts, one third I give to my son James Grover, one third to my son-in-law Benjamin Borden, for sake of his wife, my daughter Abigail, and the other third part to my son-in-law, Richard Gardiner for the sake of my daughter Hannah, his wife with all the privilidges & appurtenances thereto belonging, to them and their Heirs Execut(rs), Administrat(rs), or assignes.

Item all the rest of myEstate, Mouableor Imouable, both household and stuffe, tools, implements - cattle, horses, swine and everything elce that is mine, my will is that after decease of me and my wife, it shall be equally divided between my five children, James, Joseph, Safety, Abigail and Hannah.

Item My will is that after my decease, all my Estate, both Real and Personal shall be and Remains in the possession of my Deare Wife Rebecca for her Support and Maintenance as long as she shall live or remain a widow, and afterward to be disposed of as specified.

Lastly I doe Ordain and Appoint my son James Grover and my son-in-law Richard Gardiner to be myExecut(rs), and none other after my decease, to see this Will and Testament performed. In witness whereof I have hereunto set myhand and fixed my seale, this lst day of Dec. in the year of Our Lord l685.

This will was proved Jan. 28, 1685/6.
Witnesses: Richard Hartshorne and Tho. Webly, before John Throckmorton." Source Image. Citation Image.

8Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), page 40, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "JAMES GROVER (d. 1685/6) went to Gravesend, L. I. probably from New England before Feb. 20, 1646. The first reference to JAMES GROVER is of that date in the first division of Gravesend lands in vhich he received a house, a lot, and a farm of twenty acres. March 21, 1666/7, JAMES GROVER, Gent, sold his farm at Gravesend to Thomas Delavail. (Stillwell, John W.: Historical and Genealogical Miscellany. Vol. III, New York, 1914.

Political and land activities discussed at length in source.

JAMES GROVER was a grantee of Monmouth, N, J., I663. Lieutenant, First Company of Militia in New Jersey, Dec. 1, I663. Was appointed Burgess for Middletown in First General Assembly, 1668. Member of Court at Portland Point, July l6, I67O. Deputy to treat with Admirals and Commanders of Fleet belonging to States-General, I673. Justice of Peace at Shrewsbury, Sept. 6,1676: also at Middletown, I676. Pennsylvania C. D. A. Records.

He was chosen lieutenant, June 5, 1672. In I667-I668 he was the first town clerk of Middletown, and in 1672 he still held this position. In 1668 he was one of the founders of the Baptist Church of Middletown which was the first Baptist Church in New Jersey. - Stillwell, J. W.: Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. II , New York, 1906, p. 170.

June 13, I672. Commission granted to Mr. JAMES GROVER to be Lieutenant of a Foot Company, Middletown. Trenton Deeds, Lib.3, p. 42. Stillwell, J. W., ojj. cit., Vol. III, p. 256.

From the Old Town Book, Old Middletown, N. J., Dec. 30, 1667-Aug. 1694: Dec. 30, 1667. JAMES GROVER,lots 16 and 36; "in the mountany fields" , JAMES GROVER, Sr., lot 15: James Grover, Jr., lot 25. JAMES GROVER, Sr., Town Clearke.

August 3, 1673, p. 23. JAMES GROVER and John Bowne chosen Deputies to treat with the Admirals of the Fleet.

Sept. 12, I673. JAMES GROVER, Sr., and Jonathon Holmes presented for place of Captain; latter established.

JAMES GROVER, one of the twelve Monmouth patentees, built the first iron-works in New Jersey. Their location was at Tinton Falls. They were sold, with a large tract of adjacent land, to Colonel Lewis Morris, the eldee, in I676. — William Goulding, like JAMES GROVER, was one of the Massachusetts Bay Baptists, who were persecuted and banished from that colony on account of their religion.

"The first ironworks established in the Province of New Jersey was erected by or for JAMES GROVER. It is not definitely known whether GROVER attempted to build this furnace before Henry Leonard arrived from England, but is an established fact that it was operated under the Leonards after 1674. ...JAMES GROVER was a resident of Gravesend, Long Island and with a number of associates secured in I655, a patent from Governor Nicholas for the so-called "Monmouth Tract", which grant was later confirmed by Governor Carteret, minus certain privileges contained in the original document. GROVER soon became town miller under agreement to keep the mill in good repair, and to grind the corn of the inhabitants of Middletown. The corn mill ... had been built about eighteen months before GROVER took it over, as i s indicated by a deed dated Dec. 25. 1669, in which "the mill damme" and pond at Swimming River are mentioned. It is quite likely that the first ironworks used the same water power. Some authorities try to place its location on the Shrewsbury River, while others claim it was between Hope River (or Brook) and Darling River, and still others fix its site at Tinton Falls. A deed dated June 1, 1701, calls for land in Middletown between Burden' Brook and Jumping Brook and adjoining the "iron works". " — Boyer, C. S.: Early Forges and Furnaces in New Jersey, Philadelphia, 1931, p. I96.

Whitehead, W. A.: East Jersey under the Proprietary Governments. New York, 1875, p. 58. - On the seventh of April, 1668. Governor Carteret issued his proclamation for an assembly to be held at Elizabethtovn. The first assembly in the history of New Jersey commenced its session on the 26th, and closed on the 30th of May. This was fifteen years in advance of the first assmbly in New York, and without doubt the existence of an assembly in New Jersey had no little weight in bringing about the concession of one to the people in the adjoining province. It was composed of the following Burgesses: For Bergen, Gaspar Steinmetts and Baltahazar Bayard; for Newark on the Pishawack River, Captain Robert Treat and Samuel Swarne (or Swain); for Elizabethtown, John Ogden, Sr., and John Brackett; for Woodbridge, John Bishop and Robert Dennis; for Middletown, JAMES GROVER and John Bowne; and the last named consented also to represent Shrewsbury.

Stillwell, J . E.: Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Vol. Ill,p.249. Oct. 28 -Nov.l, 1668. He was one of the repudiated Deputies, of Middletown and Shrewsbury, to the first General Assembly, held at Elizabethtown, N. J.. 1673. As a millwright, he was employed by Lord Lovelace, Governor of New York, in the erection of a water mill upon Staten Island. Aug. 8, I673 (1674). He was chosen by Middletown, with John Bowne, a commissioner to consult upom terms of surrender with the Dutch, at Fort Orange, who had recently entered the province. July 10, I667. He was licsenced to conduct an inn.

Ibid., p. 256. Oct. 5, 1686. "To expenseat the funeral of the widow of JAMES GROVER, O5/0O/OO. Page 257. Dec. 28, 1685. "To so much Expended for funeral charges" (for JAMES GROVER).O5/IO/OO. Oct. 5, I686. "To so much expended in maintaineing the widdow," I5/OO/OO.

JAMES GROVER'S will was dated Dec. 1, 1685 and was proved Jan. 28, I685/6. His widow, REBECCA, who survived him, died the following October." Source Image. Citation Image.


Samuel Burton Adams

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=38428944. Image.


Mary Boyd

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=57009440. "aged 23 years." Image.


Samuel Boyd Adams

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=57009544. "aged 4 years 2 months." Image.