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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


Joseph Wright

1Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants: (Berryville, Va. Chesapeake Book, c1963), p.411, 975.59 H2c. a history of Frederick County, Virginia, from its formation in 1738 to 1908, compiled mainly from original records of old Frederick County, now Hampshire, Berkeley, Shenandoah, Jefferson, Hardy, Clarke, Warren, Morgan and Frederick. Image.

2Virginia, Prince William County. deeds, 1731-1869, 1748 Deed Book L, Pgs 92-94. FHL 7897262.
Marriage cited in Quit Deed references. Image.


Zeruiah Winter

1Chalkley, Lyman; Judge of the County Court of Augusta County, Virginia, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish settlement in Virginia: extracted from original court records of Augusta County, 1754-1800, Mary S. Lockwood, VP General, National Society, DAR. Volume III. The Commonwealth Co., Rosslyn, Va., pg 256, FHL 162044. "Page 20.--19th June, 1746. Zeruiah Borden, widow, of Frederick County and Benj. Borden, of Augusta, executors of Benj. Borden, late of Orange, to Francis McCune, £3 current money Virginia; 328 acres, part of 92,100 acres patented to Benjamin, Sr. 6th November, 1739, the Barrens on the south side of the creek; corner to Joseph Kennedy. Witnesses, Jno. Smith, Samson Archee, Repentance Townsend. Acknowledged by Benjamin in person and for Zeruiah, 19th June, 1746."
This shows proof of the correct spelling of her name, of being a widow in 1746 and of having a son Benjamin. Image.

2Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), pg 49, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "Religious persecution of his family continued after his death and the Frederick County records show that on May 7, 1746, the Grand Jury of Frederick County presented Zeruiah Borden, Deborah Borden and Mercy Fernley for speaking several prophane, scandalous, and contemptible words against the holy order of baptism." Image.

3William and Mary College Quarterly historical magazine, Whittet & Shepperson, Richmond, Virginia, October 1931 - pg 326. Image.

4Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants: (Berryville, Va. Chesapeake Book, c1963), Page 411, 975.59 H2c. a history of Frederick County, Virginia, from its formation in 1738 to 1908, compiled mainly from original records of old Frederick County, now Hampshire, Berkeley, Shenandoah, Jefferson, Hardy, Clarke, Warren, Morgan and Frederick. Image.

5FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/60781082/zeruriah-borden. Image.

6Cartmell, T. K. (Thomas Kemp), clerk, Shenandoah Valley pioneers and their descendants:, p.411. Image.

7Virginia, Prince William County. deeds, 1731-1869, 1748 Deed Book L, Pgs 92-94. FHL 7897262.
Marriage cited in Quit Deed references. Image.

8Virginia, Prince William County. deeds, 1731-1869, 1748 Deed Book L, Pgs 92-94. FHL 7897262. Image.


William Winter

1New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670 - 1817, pg 540. "1722. Winter, William, of Middletown, Monmouth Co., yeoman; will of. Wife, Hannah. Eldest son, John, 4 acres of salt meadow on east side of Shoal Harbor. Second son, Andrew, land where testator lived, with land bought of James Grover. Youngest son, James. Grandson, Benjamin, second son to testator's eldest son John. Son, Andrew, currier's knife and all tools of the currier's and shoemaker's trade. Son James, great Bible and carpenter's tools. Daughters-Zeuriah Borden and Rebecca Applegate. After wife's marriage or death, residue of estate to testator's two sons-in-law, Richard and Joseph Gardiner, and testator's own five children above named. Executors -- sons Andrew and James. Witnesses--Richard Applegate, Richard Gibbens, Benjamin Gibbines. Proved June 13, 1733. (Andrew Winter, surviving executor, sworn).
Lib. B, p. 460. 1733, --,-. Inventory, £99.4.6; made by John Mount, Samuel Willet, Abiel Cook. Additonal inventory, £2.11.2." New Jersey Colonial Documents.

2New Jersey, Monmouth County. Colonial Wills 1731-1735, http://files.usgwarchives.net/nj/monmouth/wills/colwills11.txt. "WINTER, WILLIAM of Middletown, Mon. Co., Yeoman, "Being in good Health."
Dated July 3, 1722. Proved by dep. of Richard Gibbins, one of the wits., that the other Evidence, Benjamin Gibbins, signed in his presence; before Robert Lawrence, Surrogate, Mon. Co., Middletowne, June 13, 1733.

Gives: "unto my Loving wife Hannah Winter all my Estate both Real and Personal During all the Time She Shall "Remain my Widdow . . . ."; "to my Eldest Son John Winter four Acres of Salt Meadow being the westerly half part of all that tract of Meadow lying on the East Side of Shoal Harbour, Called the Mill Meadow . . . . to him . . . . his heirs . . . . The other half part . . . . to my Second Son Andrew Winter with a peice of bogg Meadow "lying between the Upland and the South End of the Said Meadow; there being a barr of Sand which Seperates the Said "bogg from the sd Salt Meadow . . . . to him . . . . his heirs  . . . ."; "unto my Said Son Andrew Winter All that . . . . land whereon I now Dwell with all the Appurtenances thereunto belonging with all the "Remaining part of that . . . . land which I bought of James Grover, The Said Remaining part Joining to the "farm whereon I now live; The other part of the Said tract being already Given by me to my Son John by Deed of Gift " . . . . to him the sd Andrew his Heirs . . . ."; "to my Youngest Son James Winter All my Land and Meadow " (not already bequeathed to his Elder brothers) Lying at and near Said Shoal Harbour on the Easterly Side thereof with "all the appurtenances . . . . to him the Said James Winter his heirs . . . ."; "if my Son Andrew should "Dye without Issue that Then I Give . . . . all the Land above Given to him, to my son James & his heirs; And "all the Land that I have hereby Given to James (if the case should So happen) I hereby Give . . . . the Same to "my Grandson Benjamin Winter Second Son to my Eldest Son John & to his heirs . . . . The Sd Benjamin paying "his Uncle for all the buildings that he fhall have Erected upon the Said Land . . . ."; "if my Son James Should Dye without Iffue That then all Land and Meadow first above Given to the Sd James herein by me I then, in that case "Give . . . . the Same To the Said Benjamin Winter and his heirs . . . ."; "to my Son Andrew Winter my Curriers Knife and all my tools which belong to the Tanners and Shoemakers trade, with my Great Bible, And all my Carpenters Tools I Give to my Son James . . . ."; "to my Daughters Zeruiah Borden and Rebeckah Applegate to Each of "them the Sum of Ten pounds in Money apeice"; "after my wives Marriage or decease I Give . . all the Residue "of my Personal Estate in the following manner  . . . . That the same be Equally Divided Between my two sons in law Richard Gardiner and Joseph Gardiner and my own five Children above named . . . . share alike . . . ."

Constitutes "my Said two Sons Andrew and James Winter my Executors . . . ."

Wits.:                                                   WILLIAM WINTER.      
Richeard appelgate      Richert Gibbines [his mark]      beniaman Gibbines [his mark]

Qualification of Andrew Winter, "the Surviving Executor"; before Robert Lawrence, Surrogate, Mon. Co., Middletowne, June 13, 1733.

"Recorded in Lib. B., Wills, follo 460 . . . ."." Image.

3Orra Eugene Monnette, 1873-1936, New Jersey, First settlers of ye plantations of Piscataway and Woodbridge, Olde East. Vol 7, part 5, Los Angeles, California : Leroy Carman Press, 1930-1935, https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE3729925. "Page 875.
Three men, JOHN WINTER, WILLIAM WINTER and OBADIAH WINTER, were debtors in the estate of John Bowne of Mattawan, Middletown, Monmouth Co., in 1714, ARCH., Vol. XXIII, p . 51 and 52; and, vide, ante, this PART, p. 780)). From the name of the latter, it is easy to state that they were sons of OBEDIAH WINTER, SR.

OBADIAH WINTER was in Monmouth Co. in 1716, (idem, p. 226).

WILLIAM WINTER, (supra) was the husband of widow of Richard Gardner, Hannah Winter, 1687-1695, (do. p. 179). She was such 1704.

OBADIAH WINTER was in Cohansey, Salem Co., with JOSHUA WINTER, d. in 1734, (ARCH., Vol. XXX, 13. 529)." Source Image. Citation Image.

4George Braden Roberts, Genealogy of Joseph Peck and some related families, State College, Pennsylvania: c1955, Fiche 6049146, FHL 929.273 P334r. "William of Middletown, Monmouth Co. N.J. married widow of Richard Gardiner.

(Hist. and Geneal. Miscellany, by Stillwell, Vol. 5, p.413.) Will dated 3 July 1722 proved 3 June 1733." Image.

5FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/182088585. "~ William Winter ~
Birth: 1654
Birthplace: Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey
Death: 13 June 1733 , Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*
PARENTS:

Father:
James Obadiah Winter
Birth: 1637
Birthplace: Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey, Colonial America
Death: February 1675
Woodbridge Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, Colonial America

Mother:
Margaret (Cromwell) Winter
Birth: 1638 England
Death: 1675
Woodbridge, Province of East Jersey
...daughter of John Cromwell and Joan Cromwell
Spouse.. James Obadiah Winter
parents of *William Winter (1654-1733)*; Josiah Winter; Hester Winter; Obadiah Winter; John Winter
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*

SPOUSE:
Hannah Grover
Born: circa 1659 Gravesend, Kings County, New York, USA
Death: 1733 Daughter of James Grover, I and Rebecca (Cheeseman) Grover (1628-1686)
Wife of Richard Gardiner (1658-1687) and William Winter
Mother of Mary Gardiner; Richard Gardiner; Joseph Gardiner; Andrew Winter; John Winter

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*

Parents of Andrew Winter; John Winter; Zeruiah Borden; Rebecca Winter; James Winter

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*
CHILDREN:

Rebecca Winter Applegate
Birth: circa 1682
Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA
Death: 1732, Middlesex County, New Jersey, USA
...spouse Richard Applegate (1683-1732)." Image.


Hannah Grover

1Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "LAND: Item 11; NOTES: Freehold Court Clerk, Book K-2, p 158 May 1, 1715. Benjamin Borden, of Township of Freehold, yeoman, to David Burge ... by and with the consent good liking and approbation of his wife Zurruiah (Zeruiah), and also by and with the consent of Hannah Winter, late wife to Richard Gardiner deceased that was formerly possessed of the lands herein after bargained ... L280 ... lands in Middletown ... adjoining Christopher Allen (Almey), Lewis Mattix ... Richard Hartshorne ... all conveyed to Benjamin Borden by Richard Gardiner  Jan. 10, 1713. Signed by Benjamin Borden, Zeruiah Borden, and Hannah Winter. Witnesses: James Seabrook, William Winter, John Bray, William Lawrence, and Rachel Clark. - Acknowledged Feb. 27, 1716, by Benjain Borden before John Reid." Image.

2Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 3, Page 266, 974 D2. "
HANNAH GROVER, daughter of James Grover, 1, married first, Richard Gardiner; second William Winter.

  1708, Nov. 13. William Winter, of Middletown, cordwainer, and Hannah, his wife, quit-claimed to James Grover, wheelwright, their interest in land, "on the east most side of the middle run, on the north east side of the Mill creek," which James Grover, deceased, willed to his son, James Grover, and his son-in-law, Benjamin Borden, for the sake of his daughter, Abigail Borden, and son-in-law, Richard Gardiner, for the sake of his daughter, Hannah; also land, at Shole Harbor.
  Hannah Grover, married, first, prior to 1685, as per her father's will, Richard Gardiner, and had issue, as per will of her second husband, William Winter, Richard and Joseph Gardiner. Her husband, Richard Gardiner, died Dec. 3, 1687, leaving an estate inventoried at £45.
  Hannah Grover married, second, in 1688, William Winter, who, dying, left a will dated, July 3, 1722; proved June 13, 1733, which mentioned his wife, and her two children by her first husband, and my eldest son, John Winter, (then married and had a second son, Benjamin Winter), my son, Andrew Winter, my youngest son, James Winter, (single), my daughter, Zeruiah Borden, and my daughter, Rebecca Applegate." Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/182090250/hannah-gardiner/winter. "~ Hannah (Grover) Gardiner/ Winter ~
Birth: circa 1659/67
New York, USA
Death: 1733
Middletown
Monmouth County
New Jersey, USA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*
Parents:
James Grover III (1611 - 1685)
James Grover III (1611 - 1685)
Rebecca Cheeseman Grover (1630 - 1686)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*
Spouse:
William Winter ~
Birth: 1654 Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey, USA
Death: 13 June 1733 , Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey, USA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*
CHILDREN:

Rebecca Winter Applegate
Birth: circa 1682
Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA
Death: 1732, Middlesex County, New Jersey, USA
...spouse Richard Applegate (1683-1732)." Image.


Edward Rogers Jr.

1J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), p 400, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Probably the one of that name mentioned in Chalkey's Annals of Augusta Co. as a Revolutionary soldier."


James Pritchard Jr.

1J. A. Kelly, Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer - Notes on his ancestry and descendants (Genealogy of Virginia Families From the William and Mary College College Quarterly Historical Magazine. Vol. 1), p 401, G929.2755. Baltimore. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1982. "Was living in 1792 and at that time he wrote his name "Prichit"."


Thomas L. Branson Jr.

1Joint Committee of Hopewell Friends, Assisted by Wayland, John Walter, Hopewell Friends history, 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia, Baltimore; Genealogical Pub. Co., 1975. Copyright 1936, p 28-29, 975.5992 K2h. Records of Hopewell Monthly Meetings and Meetings reporting to Hopewell, two hundred years of history and genealogy. "Thomas Branson, 850 acres in Frederick County "Beginning at Joist Hite's corner, at the head of a small stream or branch of the Opeckon River."
    Thomas Branson was the son of Thomas Branson and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Day. Thomas Branson Sr. also had land in the Shenandoah Valley, and by his will, probated Nov. 21, 1744, in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, devised it to his sons Thomas and Jacob, and describes it as "my lands on Shannandow River in Virginia whic I laid out for Thomas Alexander and one called 'Scotch Robin'". This will was probated in Frederick County, Virginia, March 5, 1744, John and Thomas Branson qualifying as executors with Thomas Hankins and Thomas Sharp sureties. This land was near White Post, but now in Warren County; and near it Thomas Branson Jr. secured a patent in his own name for 1370 acres on both sides of Crooked Run. Near it Jacob Branson, his brother, received by patent in his own name 1000 acres. The will of Thomas Branson Sr. mentions his wife Elizabeth, sons David, Joseph, Jonathan, Lionel, William, Thomas, and John; his daughters Sarah Owin, Mary wife of Zachariah Robins, Elizabeth wife of William Rogers; his granddaughter Abigail Rogers; his grandson Thomas, son of John.
     Thomas Branson Jr. married Rebecca, daughter of Benjamin Borden, and John married Martha, widow of John Osmond and daughter of Thomas Antrim. William Branson, son of Thomas Sr., removed for a while to Stafford County, VA., and from him are descended the well known Branson family living until recent years near Clearbrook in Frederick County, Va.  Lionel, son of Thomas Sr., settled on Lost River in what is now Hardy County, West Va., where some of his descendants reside at this time."

2Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), pg 7, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "THOMAS, Jr . secured a patent in his own name for 1370 acres on both sides of Crooked un Creek. Near this land, John Branson, THOMAS, Jr.'s brother secured patent for 1000 acres. THOMAS, Jr . married in 1732 or earlier REBECCA BORDEN, the third daughter of BENJAMIN and ZERUIAH (WINTER) BORDEN." Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/174806055. "Thomas Branson was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Day Branson.

Thomas married Rebecca Borden on 1731 in NJ.

After Rebecca passed away, Thomas married Elizabeth Brown Norton on November 20, 1782 in Guilford County, NC." Image.


Rebecca W Borden

1Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), pg 39, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "3. REBECCA. She and her husband, THOMAS BRANSON, were residents of Frederick Co., Va. in 1750 but by 1753 had removed to Orange County N C.

Was disowned by the Cane Creek Monthly meeting on 6 June 1772." Image.

2Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 99, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "REBECCA, married Thomas Bronson; had two sons, Eli and Levi."

3Joint Committee of Hopewell Friends, Assisted by Wayland, John Walter, Hopewell Friends history, 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia, Baltimore; Genealogical Pub. Co., 1975. Copyright 1936, p 28-29, 975.5992 K2h. Records of Hopewell Monthly Meetings and Meetings reporting to Hopewell, two hundred years of history and genealogy. "Thomas Branson, 850 acres in Frederick County "Beginning at Joist Hite's corner, at the head of a small stream or branch of the Opeckon River."
    Thomas Branson was the son of Thomas Branson and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Day. Thomas Branson Sr. also had land in the Shenandoah Valley, and by his will, probated Nov. 21, 1744, in Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, devised it to his sons Thomas and Jacob, and describes it as "my lands on Shannandow River in Virginia whic I laid out for Thomas Alexander and one called 'Scotch Robin'". This will was probated in Frederick County, Virginia, March 5, 1744, John and Thomas Branson qualifying as executors with Thomas Hankins and Thomas Sharp sureties. This land was near White Post, but now in Warren County; and near it Thomas Branson Jr. secured a patent in his own name for 1370 acres on both sides of Crooked Run. Near it Jacob Branson, his brother, received by patent in his own name 1000 acres. The will of Thomas Branson Sr. mentions his wife Elizabeth, sons David, Joseph, Jonathan, Lionel, William, Thomas, and John; his daughters Sarah Owin, Mary wife of Zachariah Robins, Elizabeth wife of William Rogers; his granddaughter Abigail Rogers; his grandson Thomas, son of John.
     Thomas Branson Jr. married Rebecca, daughter of Benjamin Borden, and John married Martha, widow of John Osmond and daughter of Thomas Antrim. William Branson, son of Thomas Sr., removed for a while to Stafford County, VA., and from him are descended the well known Branson family living until recent years near Clearbrook in Frederick County, Va.  Lionel, son of Thomas Sr., settled on Lost River in what is now Hardy County, West Va., where some of his descendants reside at this time."

4Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, pg 7. "THOMAS, Jr . secured a patent in his own name for 1370 acres on both sides of Crooked un Creek. Near this land, John Branson, THOMAS, Jr.'s brother secured patent for 1000 acres. THOMAS, Jr . married in 1732 or earlier REBECCA BORDEN, the third daughter of BENJAMIN and ZERUIAH (WINTER) BORDEN." Image.


Robert Browne McKay

1FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=92433778. Image.


Benjamin Borden Jr.

1Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

2James E Tracy, 2009, Tracy Family History, Chapter 37 - Benjamin Borden Land Grant. Image.

3William and Mary College Quarterly historical magazine, Whittet & Shepperson, Richmond, Virginia, October 1931 - pg 327. Image.

4FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59606034. "Benjamin Borden Sr. came with and initially settled on the Opequon Quaker settlement in what is now Frederick County in 1732-33. He acquired a bit over 3,000 acres there. He contracted with John McDowell, (contract dated October, 1737 and done at his home, called “Great Spring” literally right next to Lord Fairfax’s, “Greenway Court” in northern Virginia) for John to be his first and principal surveyor and help bring in enough settlers to fulfill the terms of the grant and have the deed for it recorded.

John McDowell and his wife, Magdalene, then were responsible for bringing into the grant most of the 92 original families in 1738-1739, and the deed for the grant was recorded in 1739 for a total of 92,100 acres. John McDowell was killed on December 25, 1742 and, just about a year later, his widow married Benjamin Borden, III. who had been long pursuing her. In fact when the surveying was being done for the first 92 families, and the paperwork being written up, Benjamin Borden Sr. had his son Benjamin Jr. live with the McDowells to help with the paperwork and such. So the second marriage was founded on relationships in the first.

Magdalene had children by both John McDowell and Benjamin Borden, III. Several children died, at the same time Benjamin Borden, III, died of smallpox in 1753, but there remained three children from the first marriage and one by her marriage to Benjamin Borden, III. Magdalene had no children by her third husband, John Bowyer, but that didn’t prevent him from trying to take a piece of what rightfully was to be inherited by her children. That mess, at least, was the shortest of the several lawsuits, “only” taking about nine years to resolve — about three years after the death of John Bowyer himself.

As for the Borden Grant, it included Augusta County, and most of several adjacent counties originally. The terms of the grant were that each original settling family were to receive 100 acres free and clear for agreeing to settle, and could purchase up to 1,000 acres total at the rate of 50 shillings per 500 acres. Many families had a few hundred acres, few purchased the full 1,000 acres. This meant that when Benjamin Borden died, in 1753, his wife still owned or held mortgages on well over 60,000 acres, as some of the purchases were being made over time through mortgages. John McDowell, for his services was granted 1,000 acres outright (1737 contract).

The Woods River Grant was probably named for the Woods family, Magdalene’s family, for whom Woods Creek, off the James River just north of Lexington was also named. Her brother, Richard Woods, was one of the first sheriffs of Augusta County, and she had at least nine siblings, sisters and brothers, who all were settlers on the Borden Grant, some of whom did acquire that 1,000 acres each, and more, as other settlers sold out and moved on. They acquired additional lands as they opened up, adjacent to the Borden Grant. She and her siblings were children of Samuel Woods and Elizabeth Campbell, not the Michael Woods and Mary Campbell of Albemarle County family, who may have been (researchers are still working on this) brother and sister respectively to Samuel and Elizabeth. Michael and Samuel were contemporary and did live in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, near one another in the 1730’s prior to moving to Virginia (a lawsuit from a merchant, surnamed Smith, in Pennsylvania shows this; he named members of both families in it, and described some of the relationships. The lawsuit was transferred to Augusta County, Virginia, after a point).

(Cecelia Fabos-Becker, historical and Virginia family history researcher, 25 Jan 2016)." Image.


Magdalena Woods

1James E Tracy, 2009, Tracy Family History, Chapter 35 - Rockbridge County. Image.

2James E Tracy, 2009, Tracy Family History, Chapter 36 - McDowell Burying Ground. Contains additional information about Magdelena's wealth and her second husband, Benjamin Borden. Image.

3WorldConnect, Woods-Magdalena-Campbell.pdf. Image.

4FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59565145/magdalena-bowyer. "Magdalena and John McDowell were the parents of:
Samuel/29 Oct 1735 m. Mary McClung
James/1739 m. Elizabeth Cloyd
Sarah Martha/16 Oct 1741 (Mrs George Moffett)


In 1743, Magdalena married Benjamin Borden - they were the parents of three children:
Martha/1746
Benjamin/1749
Hannah/1753


In 1753, Magdalena married John Bowyer - they had no children.
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"It has been said that she was a 'very beautiful' woman. She lived to be 104 years old!"
(www.mcdowellhouse.com)
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Benjamin Borden contracted with John McDowell, (contract dated October, 1737 and done at his home, called “Great Spring” literally right next to Lord Fairfax’s, “Greenway Court” in northern Virginia) for John to be his first and principal surveyor and help bring in enough settlers to fulfill the terms of the grant and have the deed for it recorded.

John McDowell and his wife, Magdalene, then were responsible for bringing into the grant most of the 92 original families in 1738-1739, and the deed for the grant was recorded in 1739 for a total of 92,100 acres. John McDowell was killed on December 25, 1742 and, just about a year later, his widow married Benjamin Borden, III. who had been long pursuing her. In fact when the surveying was being done for the first 92 families, and the paperwork being written up, Benjamin Borden Sr. had his son Benjamin Jr. live with the McDowells to help with the paperwork and such. So the second marriage was founded on relationships in the first.

Magdalene had children by both John McDowell and Benjamin Borden, III. Several children died, at the same time Benjamin Borden, III, died of smallpox in 1753, but there remained three children from the first marriage and one by her marriage to Benjamin Borden, III. Magdalene had no children by her third husband, John Bowyer, but that didn’t prevent him from trying to take a piece of what rightfully was to be inherited by her children. That mess, at least, was the shortest of the several lawsuits, “only” taking about nine years to resolve — about three years after the death of John Bowyer himself!

As for the Borden Grant, it included Augusta County, and most of several adjacent counties originally. The terms of the grant were that each original settling family were to receive 100 acres free and clear for agreeing to settle, and could purchase up to 1,000 acres total at the rate of 50 shillings per 500 acres. Many families had a few hundred acres, few purchased the full 1,000 acres. This meant that when Benjamin Borden died, in 1753, his wife still owned or held mortgages on well over 60,000 acres, as some of the purchases were being made over time through mortgages. John McDowell, for his services was granted 1,000 acres outright (1737 contract).

The Woods River Grant was probably named for the Woods family, Magdalene’s family, for whom Woods Creek, off the James River just north of Lexington was also named. Her brother, Richard Woods, was one of the first sheriffs of Augusta County, and she had at least nine siblings, sisters and brothers, who all were settlers on the Borden Grant, some of whom did acquire that 1,000 acres each, and more, as other settlers sold out and moved on. They acquired additional lands as they opened up, adjacent to the Borden Grant.

She and her siblings were children of Samuel Woods and Elizabeth Campbell, not the Michael Woods and Mary Campbell of Albemarle County family, who may have been (researchers are still working on this) brother and sister respectively to Samuel and Elizabeth. Michael and Samuel were contemporary and did live in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, near one another in the 1730’s prior to moving to Virginia (a lawsuit from a merchant, surnamed Smith, in Pennsylvania shows this; he named members of both families in it, and described some of the relationships. The lawsuit was transferred to Augusta County, Virginia, after a point).

(Cecelia Fabos-Becker, historical and Virginia family researcher, 25 Jan 2016)
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[CORRECTION: Mary Magdalena Woods was the daughter of Samuel Woods and Elizabeth Campbell, NOT -Michael Marion Woods and Mary Campbell-.
Samuel was Michael's brother and Elizabeth was Mary's sister.
Samuel McDowell, Magdalena's and John's oldest son, born in 1735 was named for Magdalena's father, Samuel Woods.
This has been proven through verifiable records that were obviously not researched by Neander Woods, the author who later admitted he incorrectly relied on the Woods-McAfee unverified information when he wrote that Mary Magdelena was the daughter of Michael and Mary.

Please correct her memorial.

Thank you,
Deb Redmon, Direct descendant of Samuel Woods and Elizabeth Campbell; 9 Sep 2012]
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The site of Magdelene’s grave is not known for sure, but Rev. Neander Woods believes it would be in the surrounding graveyard of the Old Stone Church. This is good logic, for he points out that she was a founding member of the church and an active member all of her life.

She would not be buried at the McDowell cemetery, for the grandchildren erected the beautiful monument to Captain John McDowell in 1855. If Magdelene was buried here, then they would have erected a monument to her at the same time.

Timber Ridge Presbyterian Church history by Jim Tracy:
My family history website has 79 chapters. If you would like to know more about the other chapters, then go to my Home Page
(www.thetracyfamilyhistory.net)." Image.