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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


John Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 31-32, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "     The first authentic information we have of this person is when he applied to the commissioners of emigration for liberty to go to America.  This course was made necessary by the arbitrary conduct of Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, who had procured a law to be made in 1633, by which no person was allowed to leave England with the permission of the government.  The object of this law was to prevent dissenting clergymen and persons suspected of disloyal sintiments, from leaving England at all.  To obtain a permit, it was necessary for the applicant to present to the Commissioners of Emigration a certificate from the minister of his parish, certifying his conformity to the rules, regulations and doctrines of the church, and also another, from a justice of the peace in the same locality, of his loyalty to the government, and no fifth monarcy man.  And in order to insure the success of this scheme, Archbishop Laud, the real instigator of this project, was placed at the head of this commission.  This act alone caused great anxiety in the minds of those who were contemplating a removal to the new world.  And every expedient which could be thought of was put into requisition to circumvent the tyrant.
    John Borden succeeded, through the influence of friends and relatives, probably, in obtaining the requisite documents, and was granted a permit to emigrate to America.  Copy of this permitt:  "May 12, 1635.  In the Elizabeth and Ann.  Roger Cooper, Master:  The underwrititen names are to be transported, per certificate from the Minister of Benenden, Kent, of their conformitie to the orders and discipline of the Church of England," and it was customary to add to this:  "and have taken the oath of allegiance," and also, "he is no subsidy man, nor a fifth monarchy man."  But in most cased these were omitted, and I suppose because a conformity to the orders and discipline of the church was considered a true test of loyalty except in the case of suspected persons, when they were all required.  The family of John Borden named in this permit were thus entered on the list of passengers: John Borden, aged 28 years; Joan Borden, aged 23 years; Matthew Borden aged 5 years and Elizabeth Borden, aged 2 years. The ship sailed about the 20th of June, 1635, and arrived in Boston in the fall of the same year. John probably remained in the vicinity of Boston until he went to Rhode Island, where he next appears. But his stay here was short and the notice of him on the old records of Portsmouth barely show that he came upon the island. That record is this: "John Borden and Daniel Willcox were chosen on the grand inquest (jury) March 15, 1643." As there appears to have been no other John Borden known in this country at that time, except John the son of Richard of Portsmouth, who was then not three years of age, this must have been John, the companion of Richard. His employment on Rhode Island, the time of his sojourn there, and his departure are equally unknown. But in 1651 his name appears again in a list of persons who worked on the mill-dam at New London July 31st. Miss Calkins, in her history of that place says: "John Borden remained in this vicinity two or three years and then disappeared." She further states that John Borden, supposed to be a son of the preceding, was admitted to be an inhabitant of New London, January, 1662, and the same year he married Hannah Hough, the daughter of Deacon William Hough of that city. The children by this marriage were: John, Samuel, Hannah, William, Sarah and Joanna. These children were all baptized at New London, Joanna on the 11th of January, 1680. John Borden lived at Lynn, Conn., but later in life he removed to New Haven, where he died 1684. And this short notice is all the information I have obtained of these two persons. The children of the second John, probably had descendants, but as I know not the course they took, I can trace them no further. Three sons starting out at that early period, might, under ordinary circumstances, have presented a large number of descendants at this time. But we have found no Borden in America who traces his family back to John.  Rev. Pardon Gray Seabury."

2England, Kent, Canterbury Parish Registers, 1538-1986, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QKJ6-MPPJ . "Name: John
Event Type: Christening
Event Date: 22 Feb 1606
Event Place: Headcorn, Kent, England
Gender: Male
Father's Name: Mathew Borden
GS Film Number: 001473730
Digital Folder Number: 004991015
Image Number: 00035

Citing this Record
"England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538-1911," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QKJ6-MPPJ : 8 December 2017), John, 22 Feb 1606; citing Christening, Headcorn, Kent, England, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone; FHL microfilm 1,473,730." Image.


John Borden

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 31-32, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "     The first authentic information we have of this person is when he applied to the commissioners of emigration for liberty to go to America.  This course was made necessary by the arbitrary conduct of Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, who had procured a law to be made in 1633, by which no person was allowed to leave England with the permission of the government.  The object of this law was to prevent dissenting clergymen and persons suspected of disloyal sintiments, from leaving England at all.  To obtain a permit, it was necessary for the applicant to present to the Commissioners of Emigration a certificate from the minister of his parish, certifying his conformity to the rules, regulations and doctrines of the church, and also another, from a justice of the peace in the same locality, of his loyalty to the government, and no fifth monarcy man.  And in order to insure the success of this scheme, Archbishop Laud, the real instigator of this project, was placed at the head of this commission.  This act alone caused great anxiety in the minds of those who were contemplating a removal to the new world.  And every expedient which could be thought of was put into requisition to circumvent the tyrant.
    John Borden succeeded, through the influence of friends and relatives, probably, in obtaining the requisite documents, and was granted a permit to emigrate to America.  Copy of this permitt:  "May 12, 1635.  In the Elizabeth and Ann.  Roger Cooper, Master:  The underwrititen names are to be transported, per certificate from the Minister of Benenden, Kent, of their conformitie to the orders and discipline of the Church of England," and it was customary to add to this:  "and have taken the oath of allegiance," and also, "he is no subsidy man, nor a fifth monarchy man."  But in most cased these were omitted, and I suppose because a conformity to the orders and discipline of the church was considered a true test of loyalty except in the case of suspected persons, when they were all required.  The family of John Borden named in this permit were thus entered on the list of passengers: John Borden, aged 28 years; Joan Borden, aged 23 years; Matthew Borden aged 5 years and Elizabeth Borden, aged 2 years. The ship sailed about the 20th of June, 1635, and arrived in Boston in the fall of the same year. John probably remained in the vicinity of Boston until he went to Rhode Island, where he next appears. But his stay here was short and the notice of him on the old records of Portsmouth barely show that he came upon the island. That record is this: "John Borden and Daniel Willcox were chosen on the grand inquest (jury) March 15, 1643." As there appears to have been no other John Borden known in this country at that time, except John the son of Richard of Portsmouth, who was then not three years of age, this must have been John, the companion of Richard. His employment on Rhode Island, the time of his sojourn there, and his departure are equally unknown. But in 1651 his name appears again in a list of persons who worked on the mill-dam at New London July 31st. Miss Calkins, in her history of that place says: "John Borden remained in this vicinity two or three years and then disappeared." She further states that John Borden, supposed to be a son of the preceding, was admitted to be an inhabitant of New London, January, 1662, and the same year he married Hannah Hough, the daughter of Deacon William Hough of that city. The children by this marriage were: John, Samuel, Hannah, William, Sarah and Joanna. These children were all baptized at New London, Joanna on the 11th of January, 1680. John Borden lived at Lynn, Conn., but later in life he removed to New Haven, where he died 1684. And this short notice is all the information I have obtained of these two persons. The children of the second John, probably had descendants, but as I know not the course they took, I can trace them no further. Three sons starting out at that early period, might, under ordinary circumstances, have presented a large number of descendants at this time. But we have found no Borden in America who traces his family back to John.  Rev. Pardon Gray Seabury."

2England, Kent, Canterbury Parish Registers, 1538-1986, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QKJ6-MPPJ . "Name: John
Event Type: Christening
Event Date: 22 Feb 1606
Event Place: Headcorn, Kent, England
Gender: Male
Father's Name: Mathew Borden
GS Film Number: 001473730
Digital Folder Number: 004991015
Image Number: 00035

Citing this Record
"England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538-1911," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QKJ6-MPPJ : 8 December 2017), John, 22 Feb 1606; citing Christening, Headcorn, Kent, England, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone; FHL microfilm 1,473,730." Image.


Joan Andrews

1Weld, Hattie L. Borden, Borden, Richard & Joan,  who settled in Portsmouth R.I., Historical and genealogical record of the descendants..., Albany, N.Y. : Joel Munsell, [1899], pg 31-32, FHL US/CAN Film 512. "     The first authentic information we have of this person is when he applied to the commissioners of emigration for liberty to go to America.  This course was made necessary by the arbitrary conduct of Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, who had procured a law to be made in 1633, by which no person was allowed to leave England with the permission of the government.  The object of this law was to prevent dissenting clergymen and persons suspected of disloyal sintiments, from leaving England at all.  To obtain a permit, it was necessary for the applicant to present to the Commissioners of Emigration a certificate from the minister of his parish, certifying his conformity to the rules, regulations and doctrines of the church, and also another, from a justice of the peace in the same locality, of his loyalty to the government, and no fifth monarcy man.  And in order to insure the success of this scheme, Archbishop Laud, the real instigator of this project, was placed at the head of this commission.  This act alone caused great anxiety in the minds of those who were contemplating a removal to the new world.  And every expedient which could be thought of was put into requisition to circumvent the tyrant.
    John Borden succeeded, through the influence of friends and relatives, probably, in obtaining the requisite documents, and was granted a permit to emigrate to America.  Copy of this permitt:  "May 12, 1635.  In the Elizabeth and Ann.  Roger Cooper, Master:  The underwrititen names are to be transported, per certificate from the Minister of Benenden, Kent, of their conformitie to the orders and discipline of the Church of England," and it was customary to add to this:  "and have taken the oath of allegiance," and also, "he is no subsidy man, nor a fifth monarchy man."  But in most cased these were omitted, and I suppose because a conformity to the orders and discipline of the church was considered a true test of loyalty except in the case of suspected persons, when they were all required.  The family of John Borden named in this permit were thus entered on the list of passengers: John Borden, aged 28 years; Joan Borden, aged 23 years; Matthew Borden aged 5 years and Elizabeth Borden, aged 2 years. The ship sailed about the 20th of June, 1635, and arrived in Boston in the fall of the same year. John probably remained in the vicinity of Boston until he went to Rhode Island, where he next appears. But his stay here was short and the notice of him on the old records of Portsmouth barely show that he came upon the island. That record is this: "John Borden and Daniel Willcox were chosen on the grand inquest (jury) March 15, 1643." As there appears to have been no other John Borden known in this country at that time, except John the son of Richard of Portsmouth, who was then not three years of age, this must have been John, the companion of Richard. His employment on Rhode Island, the time of his sojourn there, and his departure are equally unknown. But in 1651 his name appears again in a list of persons who worked on the mill-dam at New London July 31st. Miss Calkins, in her history of that place says: "John Borden remained in this vicinity two or three years and then disappeared." She further states that John Borden, supposed to be a son of the preceding, was admitted to be an inhabitant of New London, January, 1662, and the same year he married Hannah Hough, the daughter of Deacon William Hough of that city. The children by this marriage were: John, Samuel, Hannah, William, Sarah and Joanna. These children were all baptized at New London, Joanna on the 11th of January, 1680. John Borden lived at Lynn, Conn., but later in life he removed to New Haven, where he died 1684. And this short notice is all the information I have obtained of these two persons. The children of the second John, probably had descendants, but as I know not the course they took, I can trace them no further. Three sons starting out at that early period, might, under ordinary circumstances, have presented a large number of descendants at this time. But we have found no Borden in America who traces his family back to John.  Rev. Pardon Gray Seabury."


Yeoman Richard Fowle

1George Braden Roberts, Genealogy of Joseph Peck and some related families, State College, Pennsylvania: c1955, https:\\dcms.lds.org\delivery\DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE5022269, FHL 929.273 P334r. "CONFLICT: Pg. 165 lists baptism in 1569 and later in 1659. Records contributed by G.Andrews Moriarity, Jr. of Newport, R.I. abstracted from Parish Records of Frittenden, Kent, England.

WILL: Consistory of Canterbury; ; ;Vol 49, folio. 313.
WILL: N.E. Hist. and Geneal. Register; ; ; Vol. 75, pp 226-233; ; dated 20 Dec 1630. Proved 26 Mar 1631. States he had other children namely, "To Elizabeth Joseph my daughter. To Jane Fowle my youngest daughter. To my daughter-in-law Mary Stannard. To widow Perrin."." Fiche 6049146. Source Image. Citation Image.

2England, Kent. Tyler Index to Parish Registers, 1538-1874. "Name: Richd Fowlle
Baptism Age: 0
Event Type: Baptism
Birth Date: 1569
Baptism Date: 18 Dec 1569
Baptism Place: Frittenden, Kent
Phillimore Ecclesiastical Parish Map:
View this parish
Relation: Son
Father: Thos Fowlle." https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1901/31854_A012198-00047?pid=247025&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv%3D1%26dbid%3D1901%26h%3D247025%26tid%3D%26pid%3D%26usePUB%3Dtrue%26_phsrc%3DIrn48%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Irn48&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&_ga=2.4428339.1657264995.1561149914-386310265.1559578521. Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/69321665/richard-fowle. "Yeoman.

Baptized at Frittenden, December 18, 1569.

Married Mary Filkes, widow, of Frittenden, at St Margaret's, Canterbury, with a license dated September 3, 1601." Image.

4England, Kent, Wills and Probate, 1440-1881. "inv Fowle Richard Headcorn 1630 1631 PRC/28/15/85 Yeoman, Will 1631
Will Fowle Richard Headcorn 1630 1631 PRC/32/49/313 PRC/31/97 F/1 1631
England, Kent, Wills and Probate, 1440-1881
Kent, Diocese of Canterbury
Wills 1631, A-Z   image 129  of 330
will written 20 December 1630
Richard Fowle of Headcorn, Kent yeoman
-poor of Headcorn
-daughter Elizabeth Joseph
-youngest daughter Jane Fowle 300 pounds
-daughter in law[can mean step-daughter] Mary Stonnard
-widow Perkin
-grandchild Richard Borden..his mother Jone Borthen to take the profits..
-son Richard Fowle as executor
witnesses Francis Fowle  Clemis Fytch
proved 26 March 1631

"England, Kent, Wills and Probate, 1440-1881," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRGZ-9GMX?cc=1949814&wc=M68V-BNR%3A250713801%2C250719201%2C251332701 : 20 May 2014), Kent, Diocese of Canterbury > Wills > 1631, A-Z > image 129 of 330; County Record Office, Maidstone." Image.


Margaret Marye Portrey

1England - Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Marriages Transcription, https://archive.org/details/canterburymarria01cant/page/190/mode/2up. "Shurte, Thomas, of Tenterden, and Dorothy Rowland of Brabourne, virgin.  July 26, 1591.
Sheirte, [Shurte] Thomas, of Tenterden, baker, and Mary Portrey, same parish, virgin.  December 10, 1595." Image.

2England Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JZY9-C38. Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/182447839/mary-fowle. Image.


Thomas Fowle

1England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NNV9-T4M. Image.


Thomas Borden

1Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, Joel Munsells Sons, Albany, N.Y. 1887. viii, 447 p., pg 23. Digital version. Source Image. Citation Image.

2England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ6-9XFS . Image.

3John Osborne Austin, 1846-1918, One Hundred and Sixty Allied Families New England, page 125. Source Image. Citation Image.

4FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21862968. Image.

5Rhode Island, Newport (Society of Friends Extracted marriage records), Batch #: M525051, Source Call #: 22488.


Mary Harris

1John Osborne Austin, 1846-1918, One Hundred and Sixty Allied Families New England, page 125. Source Image. Citation Image.

2Rhode Island, Newport (Society of Friends Extracted marriage records), Batch #: M525051, Source Call #: 22488.

3Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, Joel Munsells Sons, Albany, N.Y. 1887. viii, 447 p., pg 23. Digital version. Source Image. Citation Image.


Yeoman Francis Borden

1Augusta A. Pettit, Mrs., 1932, Borden, Lloyd, Levis families of Shrewsbury, East Jersey, Some genealogical notes on the, Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1971, pgs 8, 9, FHL US/CAN Film 858787 Item 7. "Jane continues to be amongst the witnesses to marriages until the year 1719.  Francis will was dated at Shrewsbury May 24, 1703 and proven May 9, 1706." marriage, children and death listed.

2Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, Joel Munsells Sons, Albany, N.Y. 1887. viii, 447 p., pg 23. Digital version. Source Image. Citation Image.

3Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 1, pg 268, 974 D2. "
THE FRIENDS' RECORDS OF SHREWSBURY, N. J.
Children of Francis Borden and Jane:
Richard, born at Strews., 11th of 2 mo., ....
Francis born at Shrews., 1st of 9 mo., 1678
Joyce, born at Shrews., 4th of 4 mo., 168.
Thomas, born at Shrews., 4th of 12 mo., 1684." Source Image. Citation Image.

4Borden, Charles F., Borden family of Shrewsbury, New Jersey, Genealogy of the; 1370-1868, Typescript (46 p.) of "Borden Scrapbook" & family papers. 1952, FHL Film 0858787, item 6. "The 12th day of 4th month 1677 Francis Borden married Jane Vickers at Francis Borden's house. (Copied from Records of Friends meeting House, Shrewsbury, NJ.) This was the second marriage recorded in the Friends' vital statistics at Shrewsbury. Will dated 24 May 1703 at Shrewsbury, NJ (proved 9 May 1706), bequeaths to son Francis his land in Parish of Goudhurst, County Kent, England, "as the same is conveyed to me by virtue of his great uncle, Francis Fowle of Cranbrook in said county of Kent," by Fowle's will dated 8 Oct 1632. Witnesses included Thomas Bills, Sr. and Thomas Bills, Jr. members of a family connected with the Borden family in England.(Ref: Vol. 75, p 229.) Records now in keeping of Mr. Edward Borden, Eatontown, NJ."

5Hattie L. Borden Weld, Historical Genealogical Record of Descendants of Richard and Joan Borden Who settled in Portsmouth, RI, 1638 (Joel Munsell's Sons, Albany, NY, 1899), FHL film 0000512. "He was surveyor assistant to his father. She also quotes Friends Record, "Francis married Jane Vicars of Yorkshire, England," (second entry in her record.)."

6Thomas Allen Glenn, b. 1864, Borden, Pedigree of Richard, who removed from the county of Kent, Old England, 1637-1638 and settled at Portsmouth, RI, 617 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Printed for private distribution, 1901. -- 15 p., FHF 0990349. "He inherited from his father considerable tracts of land near Shrewsbury, East Jersey, where he settled about 1677. WILL: In his will filed but unrecorded, at Trenton, NJ which was signed 24 May 1703, he describe himself as of the Town of Shrewsbury in the County of Monmouth, Yeoman. To his son Francis he bequeaths (all of his land in the Parish of Goudhurst, in the County of Kent, England, as the same is conveyed to me by virtue of Francis Fowle of Cranbrook in his last will and testament 1632."

7Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), p 33, item 11;  Book D, p 57, 1693, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "Freehold Court Clerk office, mentions Francis & Jane, his wife." Image.

8England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J7RD-28Q. "Name: Ffranncis Borden
Residence Place: Cranbrook, Kent, England
Gender: Unknown
Christening Date: 28 Dec 1628
Christening Date (Original): 28 Dec 1628
Christening Place: Cranbrook, Kent, England
Father's Name: Ricdi.

Other information in the record of Ffranncis Borden
Name: Ffranncis Borden
Residence Place: Cranbrook, Kent, England
Gender: Unknown
Christening Date: 28 Dec 1628
Christening Date (Original): 28 Dec 1628
Christening Place: Cranbrook, Kent, England
Father's Name: Ricdi.

Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C03077-0
System Origin: England-EASy
GS Film number: 2228373
Reference ID: item 2

Citing this Record
"England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J7RD-28Q : 11 February 2018, Ricdi. in entry for Ffranncis Borden, ); citing item 2, index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 2,228,373."
Register of Cranbrook Parish Church. Image.

9Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 1, pg 241. "1677, 12 of 4th mo., Francis Borden md. to Jane Vicars, at Franis Borden's house:
Wits:." Image.

10New Jersey, Abstract of Wills, 1670 - 1817, https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2793/32669_236608-00149?pid=22709. "Volume XXIII, Abstract of Wills, 1670-1730
1703 May 24. Borden, Francis, of Shrewsbury, yeoman; will of. Wife Jane; sons-Richard (eldest), Thomas, Francis; daughter Joyce, wife of John Hance, junior; kinsman Isaac Viccars. Land adjoining, Eliakim Wordel alias Ephraim Allien, do. in the Town of Freehold, do. patented March 25, 1637, do. bought of Edward Williams May 4, 1696, do. of brother John Borden April 7, 1700, property in the Parish 0f Goud­herst, Co. of Kent, England, inherited from Frances Fowle, of Cranbrook, same Co., by his will of October S, 1632, land in Shrewsbury, bought of Abraham Brown. The wife and son Francis executors. Witnesses­ - Thomas Eills, Samvell Child, Thomas Bills, jun., Sam. Dennis.

1705-6 Feb. 18. Codicill, makes different disposition of real and per­sonal property and gives legacies to grandsons Joseph and John Hance. Witnesses - Samvell Child, Isaac Hance, Joseph Rodgers and Sam'I Dennis.
Proved May 9, 1706. Lib. i, p. 151

1706 May 2. Inventory of the personal estate (L106.i1.6), made by George Allin, John Woolley and Joseph Rogers. Monmouth Wills." Image.


Jane Vicars

1Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 1, pg 241, 974 D2. "1677, 12 of 4th mo., Francis Borden md. to Jane Vicars, at Franis Borden's house:
Wits:." Image.

2Augusta A. Pettit, Mrs., 1932, Borden, Lloyd, Levis families of Shrewsbury, East Jersey, Some genealogical notes on the, Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1971, pgs 8, 9, FHL US/CAN Film 858787 Item 7. "Jane continues to be amongst the witnesses to marriages until the year 1719.  Francis will was dated at Shrewsbury May 24, 1703 and proven May 9, 1706." marriage, children and death listed.

3Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, Joel Munsells Sons, Albany, N.Y. 1887. viii, 447 p., pg 23. Digital version. Source Image. Citation Image.

4Stillwell, John E. (John Edwin), 1853-1930 (Main Author), Historical and genealogical miscellany: data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey. Vol. 1, pg 268. "
THE FRIENDS' RECORDS OF SHREWSBURY, N. J.
Children of Francis Borden and Jane:
Richard, born at Strews., 11th of 2 mo., ....
Francis born at Shrews., 1st of 9 mo., 1678
Joyce, born at Shrews., 4th of 4 mo., 168.
Thomas, born at Shrews., 4th of 12 mo., 1684." Source Image. Citation Image.

5Borden, Charles F., Borden family of Shrewsbury, New Jersey, Genealogy of the; 1370-1868, Typescript (46 p.) of "Borden Scrapbook" & family papers. 1952, FHL Film 0858787, item 6. "The 12th day of 4th month 1677 Francis Borden married Jane Vickers at Francis Borden's house. (Copied from Records of Friends meeting House, Shrewsbury, NJ.) This was the second marriage recorded in the Friends' vital statistics at Shrewsbury. Will dated 24 May 1703 at Shrewsbury, NJ (proved 9 May 1706), bequeaths to son Francis his land in Parish of Goudhurst, County Kent, England, "as the same is conveyed to me by virtue of his great uncle, Francis Fowle of Cranbrook in said county of Kent," by Fowle's will dated 8 Oct 1632. Witnesses included Thomas Bills, Sr. and Thomas Bills, Jr. members of a family connected with the Borden family in England.(Ref: Vol. 75, p 229.) Records now in keeping of Mr. Edward Borden, Eatontown, NJ."

6Hattie L. Borden Weld, Historical Genealogical Record of Descendants of Richard and Joan Borden Who settled in Portsmouth, RI, 1638 (Joel Munsell's Sons, Albany, NY, 1899), FHL film 0000512. "He was surveyor assistant to his father. She also quotes Friends Record, "Francis married Jane Vicars of Yorkshire, England," (second entry in her record.)."

7Thomas Allen Glenn, b. 1864, Borden, Pedigree of Richard, who removed from the county of Kent, Old England, 1637-1638 and settled at Portsmouth, RI, 617 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Printed for private distribution, 1901. -- 15 p., FHF 0990349. "He inherited from his father considerable tracts of land near Shrewsbury, East Jersey, where he settled about 1677. WILL: In his will filed but unrecorded, at Trenton, NJ which was signed 24 May 1703, he describe himself as of the Town of Shrewsbury in the County of Monmouth, Yeoman. To his son Francis he bequeaths (all of his land in the Parish of Goudhurst, in the County of Kent, England, as the same is conveyed to me by virtue of Francis Fowle of Cranbrook in his last will and testament 1632."

8Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling;, Branson, The ancestors and descendents of Thomas and Rebecca Borden; 1380-1950, 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; , Compiled by The Media Research Bureau at 1110 F Street, Washington, D.C. (1974), p 33, item 11;  Book D, p 57, 1693, 929.273 B735w  FH Library Film 0928077. "Freehold Court Clerk office, mentions Francis & Jane, his wife." Image.


Capt. John Cooke

1Fiske, Jane Fletcher, 1930- (Main Author), Cooke,Thomas of Rhode Island : genealogy of Cooke alias Butcher of Netherbury, Dorsetshire, England (Boxford, Mass. : J.F. Fiske, c1987), 35, 36, JSMB US/CAN Book 929.273 C776f. "John Cooke was made a freeman of Portsmouth on 10 July 1648, when he was only eighteen years old (Early Records of Portsmouth, p. 39).  His name appears again on a 1655 list of freemen, and on the Conanicut Purchase agreement, dated 10 March 1656/7 at Newport, for 1/250th part of [Jamestown] Island (R.I. Archives).  On 14 May 1660 his parents deeded to him sixty acres of land in Portsmouth, using for both father and son the name "Cooke alias Butcher".  This deed in 1979 provided the necessary link inh discovery of the English origins of the family.

The ear mark for John's cattle was recorded 26 April 1668, as of fourteen years standing: "a crope one the left Eare and a hapene under the crop one the under side of ye Eare and a slitt on the Right Eare and a hapeny before or one the fore side of the same Eve," which, translated Into modern English, meant a crop (small out) on Me left ear with the brand of a halfpenny under it, and a slit on the right ear with the brand of a halfpenny In front of it (ibid, p. 277).

On 22 February 1665, John Cooke was among those Portsmouth men chosen to serve on a committee to make a rate (i.e. an assessment for tax purposes) of £100 to pay Dr. John Clarke (ibid, 131). Dr. Clarke had gone to England to obtain from King Charles II a new Royal Charter which would give the Colony much needed legal guarantees and freedoms; his efforts were successful and the General Assembly voted to pay his expenses and to give him an additional sum for his trouble.

John Cooke was chosen 17 October 1667, along with his brother Thomas, to be a grand juryman at the Court of Trials, a duty he performed again in 1669 and 1673. In 1670 he was a deputy to the General Assembly In Newport, and on 5 June 1671 was chosen a constable of Portsmouth (ibid., pp. 139,155,162).

On 3 June 1968 John Cooke and Daniel Wilcox were given the privilege of running a ferry at Pocasset. This was the ferry at the northern end of the island, sometimes called Howland's ferry, about where the Stone Bridge to Tiverton was later built.

On 20 March 1669/70 John Cook signed his mark to a receipt for "six hundred and three quarters and three pounds of good and merchantable barr Iron received from Capt. Thomas Leonard and James Leonard Jr. of Taunton in the county of Bristol upon ye account of Theodotious Moore chaynmaker of Boston in New England for the use of Jonathan Blackman of Little Compton in ye county of Bristol" (scrapbook in office of Taunton city clerk, p. 301).

John Cooke of Portsmouth on 22 August 1671 purchased from Thomas Burge of Newport one-sixth share of land in Dartmouth "at Acushnet Ponegansett" for 9.11, 5 shillings. He evidently owned land in New Jersey before 15 July 1673, when, calling himself yeoman, he deeded to Robert Gibbs of Punkatest in New Plymouth three-fourths of a share of land at Portapeage, N. J, the deed being witnessed by John Sanford and: Francis Brayton. This deed was annulled 24 January 1674 by mutual agreement (R.I. Land Evidences 1:30,31). In 1677, a warrant for 240 acres in the Monmouth Patent, "to be subsequently located and surveyed," was issued by the East Jersey Proprietors to Caleb Shrife (Shrieve) in the right of John Cook. (Edwin Salter, A History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties [Bayonne, N.J., 18901, p. 30], but the deed from Cook to Shrieve was apparently never recorded. Salter comments that many of those "to whom warrants were issued in 1675 or later had -been settlers for a number of years previous" (ibid., 28).

Zoeth Howland was murdered by Indians at Little Compton, and on 24 August 16761 John Cooke, aged about 45 years, testified that he "being at punckatest in the middle of July or thereabouts, did ask of severall Indians named as followeth,  Woodcock, Matocoat, and Job, whome they were that kil'd Zow Howland ... answer was that there was six of them in company and Manasses was the Indian that,_ fetched him out of the water" (Newport Court Book A, p. 30, Providence College, Archives).

Thomas Cook Sr. died in 1677 and sometime "in the year of 167811 John Coo k, Sr. signed a receipt for his Inheritance under his father's will, "of my mother-in-law [i.e. stepmother) Mary Cook as executrix to the estate of my deceased father Thomas Cook." Under the terms of the will, he received only one cow, {probably because his father had already given him land in 1660), and each of his children was to have one shilling.

On 30 April 1680 John Cooke of Portsmouth sold to Thomas Ward of Newport.  for £18, 5 shillings the land in Dartmouth that he had bought from Thomas Burge in 1671 (R.L Land Evidences 1. 134). Although he was not one of the original proprietors of the Pocasset Purchase In March 1680, whereby the area which became Tiverton was bought from Plymouth Colony, John Cooke on 24 November 16 80 purchased two shares in the Purchase from his son-in-law William Manchester, who owned five. Called John Cooke, Sr., of Portsmouth, yeoman, he paid £73:05:08 to William Manchester of Punckatest, yeoman, and his wife Mary (R.I. Land Evidence, 1:138). When the Great Lots were laid out, from the Sakonnet River eastward, John Cooke drew numbers 16 and 19.

On the same day that he bought the Pocasset land, John Cooke purchased one-half of thirteen shares of land lying in Punckatest Neck from William Manchester and his wife Mary for £60, it being land which Manchester had bought from Thomas Lawton of Portsmouth in 1877 (ibid.). On 17 July 1682 John Cooke, aged 51 years, and John Cooke Jr., aged 26 years, both of Portsmouth, testified that in March last they had witnessed the delivery of premises in Portsmouth deeded by William Browne of Salem, Mass. *to George Sisson. This deed, dated 11 February 1681/2, conveyed a 400 acre farm which had been given to Mehitable Brown, wife of Joseph Brown, by her father William Brenton. It was bounded on the south by land "late in the Teanure of Thomas Cooke senr. deceased and Westerly ... partly by the Land lately in Teanure of John Cooke senr. and partly by the land of the late Widow Cooke" (ibid., p. 160).

John Cooke Sen'r of Portsmouth and Mary his wife on 1 June 1686 deeded to Thomas Waite of Punckatest five shares in the 13th lot and one share in the 11th lot at Punckatest Neck. William Manchester and Ephraim Turner witnessed the deed (Bristol Co. Deeds 4-78). On 28 February 1686/7 Benjamin Church of New Bristol in New England, for 936 paid by John Cooke Sr., inhabitant of Portsmouth on Rhode Island, deeded to him land on Punckatest Neck, the whole of the 10th lot which was laid out for 22 acres, which Church had bought of Edward Gray of Plymouth and Arthur Hathaway of Dartmouth by deeds dated 4 March 1679. George Sisson and Gilbert Magick witnessed this deed (Court Piles, Suffolk, 42579).

On 29 March 1688 Jeremiah Browne of Newport and his wife Mary, formerly wife of Thomas Cooke Sr., deeded to, John Cooke of Portsmouth for E39 ten acres in Portsmouth bounded on the east by land of George Sisson, north by Stephen Cornell, west by land formerly of Thomas Fish, deceased, and south by land of said John Cooke and the Common. Robert Little and Weston Clarke were witnesses (R.I. Land Evidence 1:211). This was evidently the ten acres which Thomas Cooke in his will had left to Mary for her own use use."

2Wilbour, Benjamin Franklin, 1887-1964 (Main Author), Little Compton Families, Little Compton Historical Society, 1967 College Hill Press Providence, R.I., pp.205-206, FHL Film 844901 Item 1. "His will made 15 May 1691 and proved 25 May 1691: "To son John one hundred and fifty acres at Punketest with housing and four acres in Sapwet in LC reserving right of my son Joseph of getting hay at Punkatest for 15 head of cattle; to son Joseph housing and land where I now dwell in Portsmouth and four acres at Sapowet Marsh and son Joseph to pay his sisters Mary Manchester, wife of William, Elizabeth Briggs, wife of William, Sarah Wait, wife of Thomas, Hannah Wilcox, wife of Daniel and Martha Cory, wife of William, 10 punds each; to Deborah Almy, wife of William, 1 shilling; to Amey Clayton, wife of David, 10 pounds; and to each other sister (pg 206) there being six of them, a cow; to daughter Mary Manchester 10 sheep; to daughter Elizabeth Briggs a feather bed; to son Joseph negro man Jack for rest of life and Indian woman Maria to be his servant for 10 years and then freed, and Indian boy Joan Francisco to serve him till 24 years of age; to son Thomas a share of land at Pocasset, 20 sheep, etc.; to son Samuel land at Pocasset; to son John negro woman Betty and child; to grandauther Sarah Manchester a cow..."."

3Jane Fletcher Fiske 1930, Thomas Cooke of Rhode Island: a genealogy of Thomas Cooke alias Butcher, J.F. Fiske, c1987 , Page 16. "On 14 May 1660 Thomas Cooke, Senior, alias Butcher, of Portsmouth, deeded to John Cooke alias Butcher, "my sonne lawfully begotten of my owne body," about sixty acres in Portsmouth, "the west and upper end ajoyning to the common, the east and lower end ajoyning to the common and the south ajoyning to Captin Thomas Cooke's land and the north ajoyning to the land of the above named John Cooke which formerly I bought and purchased of the town of Portsmoth [I] grante freely and vollenteryly give and bestow for Severall Respects moving me there to [I] Resarve those priviledges to my Selfe viz. that I the above named Thomas shall have free Egress and Regress through the land for the convaience of timber or other occations that may consarn my Nessary ocations to my howse or land from the Common liberty to cut wood my wife Marie" surrendered her dower right, signing by a mark combining the initials "M" and "C"; Thomas signed with his mark, "T". The deed was witnessed by John Cranston and Peter Parker (Portsmouth LE 1:30). It was the wording of this deed, misunderstood over the years to mean that both Thomas and John Cooke were butchers by trade, that led finally to the discovery of the parish in England from which the family came." Image.

4England, Dorset, Parish Registers, 1538-1936, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QJDH-KY8X. "Name: Johannes Cooke Or Butcher
Event Type: Christening
Event Date: 30 Mar 1630
Event Place: Netherbury, Netherbury, Dorset, England
Father's Name: Thoma Cooke Or Butcher
GS Film Number: 002427548
Digital Folder Number: 004508607
Image Number: 00111

Citing this Record
"England, Dorset, Parish Registers, 1538-1936," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDH-KY8F : 11 December 2017), Thoma Cooke Or Butcher in entry for Johannes Cooke Or Butcher, 30 Mar 1630; Christening, citing Netherbury, Netherbury, Dorset, England, Record Office, Dorchester; FHL microfilm 2,427,548." Image.

5FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21863959. "John Cooke's will dated 15 May 1691, Although of sound memory and understanding, yet being aged and calling to mind the brevity and uncertainty of this life not knowing how soon the Lord may call me from hence especially considering the sore visitation of the smallpox wherewith many are now visited and many have been taken away.

To my son John Cook I leave the land at Puncatest Neck, it being about 150 acres, together with the housing thereon, 4 acres of saltmarsh meadow at Sapowet in Little Compton, together with one-half of the upland, 8 head of neat cattle, the feather bed and bedding in the house John, Jr. now lives in at Puncatest, and 20 sheep. From this bequest 15 head of cattle at Puncatest reserved for Joseph Cook during his lifetime to keep and to harvest hay there for the wintering of those cattle.

To my son Joseph Cook the housing where John now lives in Portsmouth, together with all the land and outbuildings, 4 acres of saltmarsh meadow at Sapowet and one-half of the upland there. If Joseph should die without male heirs this property then goes to son Thomas and his male heirs. Within a half year of my decease, Joseph is to pay his sister Mary, wife of William Manchester, £10 and to deliver to her 10 sheep. To his sisters, Elizabeth, wife of William Briggs, Sarah, wife of Thomas Wait, Hannah, wife of Daniel Wilcox, and Martha, wife of William Cory, Joseph is to pay £10 apiece. Sister Deborah, wife of William Almy, is to have only one shilling. Sister Amy, wife of David Clayton, is to be paid £10 in money, and to each of his other sisters being six of them he shall deliver to each of them a cow. Elizabeth Briggs also to receive a feather bed, bedding and furniture. To Joseph I leave my Negro man called Jack who is of service for time of his Life and my Indian woman Maria to be his servant for ten years and then to be freed, and my Indian boy Goan Francisco to serve with him until he be twenty-four years old, at which time Joseph is to put him in good apparel and give him corn and a horse. Joseph also to receive feather bed and bedding.

To son Thomas Cook I leave the 16th lot in Pocasset Purchase, divided or undivided, and 4 acres of salt marsh.
To son Samuel Cook I leave the 19th lot in Pocasset Purchase, but Samuel is to have the disposal of this without the advice and consent of the executor and overseers of the will.

To son John Cook I bequeath my Negro woman Betty and to son Thomas 20 sheep, 3 cows and a mare.
Joseph Cook was named whole and sole executor of the will and Request and Intreat my Loving friends and neighbours George Sisson and Isaac Lawton to be my overseers to do their utmost that all Things may be managed aright according as I do hereby dispose. Moreover I will and bequeath to my Granddaughter Sarah Manchester a cow to be delivered her at the day of her marriage....

Will was proved 25 May 1691(Portsmouth TC 2:266). A copy of this will is included in Court Files, Suffolk, 42579, where it was entered into evidence over fifty years later by John's great-grandson William Cook when he was seeking to recover his inheritance.

==============================================
John Cooke was made a freeman of Portsmouth on 10 July 1648, when he was only eighteen years old (Early Records of Portsmouth, p. 39). His name appears again on a 1655 list of freemen, and on the Conanicut Purchase agreement, date 10 March 1656/7 at Newport, for 1/250th part of [Jamestown] Island (R.I. Archives). On 14 May 1660 his parents deeded to him sixty acres of land in Portsmouth, using for both father and son the name "Cooke alias Butcher."

The ear mark for John's cattle was recorded 26 April 1668, as of fourteen years standing: "a crope one the left Eare and a hapene under the crop one the under side of ye Eare and a slitt on the Right Eare and a hapeny before or one the fore side of the same Eare," wich, translated into modern English, meant a corp (small cut) on the left ear with the brand of a halfpenny under it, and a slit on the right ear with the brand of a halfpenny in front of it.

On 22 February 1665/6, John Cooke was among those Portsmouth men chosen to serve on a committee to make a rate (i.e. an assessment for tax purposes) of £100 to pay Dr. John Clarke. Dr. Clarke had gone to England to obtain from King Charles II a new Royal Charter which would give the Colony much needed legal guarantees and freedoms; his efforts were successful and the General Assembly voted to pay his expenses and to give him an additional sum for his trouble.

John Cooke was chosen 17 October 1667, along with his brother Thomas, to be a grand juryman at the Court of Trails, a duty he performed again in 1669 and 1673. In 1670 he was a deputy to the General Assembly in Newport, and on 5 June 1671 was chosen a constable of Portsmouth.

On 3 June 1668 John Cooke and Daniel Wilcox were given the privilege of running a ferry at Pocasset. This was the ferry at the northern end of the island, sometimes called Howland's Ferry, about where the Stone Bridge to Tiverton was later built.

On 20 March 1669/70 John Cook signed his mark to a receipt for "six hundred and three quarters and three pounds of good and merchantable barr iron received from Capt. Thomas Leonard and James Leonard Jr. of Taunton in the county of Bristol upon ye account of Theodotious Moore Chaynmaker of Boston in New England for the use of Jonathan Blackman of Little Compton in ye county of Bristol" (scrapbook in office of Taunton city clerk, p.301).
John Cooke of Portsmouth on 22 August 1671 purchased from Thomas Burge of Newport one-sixty share of land in Dartmouth "at Acushnet Ponegansett" for £11, 5 shillings. He evidently owned land in New Jersey before 15 July 1673, when, calling three-fourths of a share of land at Portapeage, N.J., the deed being witnessed by John Sanford and Francis Brayton. The deed was annulled 24 January 1674 by mutual agreement (R.I. Land Evidences 1:30,31). In 1677, a warrant for 240 acres in the Monmouth Patent, "to be subsequently located and surveyed," was issued by the East Jersey Proprietors to Caleb Shrife (Shrieve) in the firht of John Cook (Edwin Salter, A History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties [Bayonne, N.J., 1890], p. 30), but the deed from Cook to Shrieve was apparently never recorded. alter comments that many of those "to whom warrants were issued in 1675 or later had been settlers for a number of years previous".

Zoeth Howland was murdered by Indians at Little Compton, and on 24 August 1676, John Cooke, aged about 45 years, testified that he "being at Punckatest in the middle of July or thereabouts, did ask of severall Indians named as followeth, Woodcoc, Matocoat, and Job, whome they were kil'd Zow Howland...answer was that there was six of them in company and Manasses was the Indian that fetched him out of the water" (Newport Court Book A, p. 36, Providence College Archives).

Thomas Cook Sr. died in 1677 and sometime "in the year of 1678" John Cook, Sr. signed a receipt for his inheritance under his father's will, "of my mother-in-law (i.e. stepmother] Mary Cook as executrix to the estate of my deceased father Thomas Cook." Under the terms of the will, he received only one cow, (probably because his father had already given him land in 1660), and each of his children was to have one shilling.

On 30 April 1680 John Cooke of Portsmouth sold to Thomas Ward of Newport for £18, 5 shillings the land in Dartmouth that he had bought from Thomas Burge in 1671 (R.I. Land Evidences 1:134). Although he was not one of the original proprietors of the Pocasset Purchase in March 1680, whereby the area which became Tiverton was bought from the Plymouth Colony, John Cooke on 24 November 1680purchased two shares in the Purchase from his son-in-law William Manchester, who owned five. Called John Cooke, Sr., of Portsmouth, yeoman, he paid £73:05:08 to William Manchester of Punckatest, yeoman, and his wife Mary (R.I. Land Evidence, 1:138). When the Great Lots were laid out, from the Sakonnet River eastward, John Cooke drew numbers 16 and 19.

On the same day that he bought the Pocasset land, John Cooke purchased one-half of thirteen shares of land lying in Punckatest Neck from William Manchester and his wife Mary for £60, it being land which Manchester had bought from Thomas Lawton of Portsmouth in 1677. On 17 July 1682 John Cooke, aged 51 years, and John Cooke Jr., aged 26 years, both of Portsmouth, testified that in March last they had witnessed the delivery of Premises in Portsmouth deeded by William Browne of Salem, Mass. to George Sisson. This deed, dated 11 February 1681/2, conveyed a 400 acre farm which had been given to Mehitable Brown, wife of Joseph Brown, by her father William Brenton. It was bounded on the south by land "late in the Teanure of Thomas Cooke Senr. deceased and Westerly ... partly by the land lately in Teanue of John Cooke senr. and partly by the land of the late Widow Cooke".
John Cooke Sen'r of Portsmouth and Mary his wife on 1 June 1686 deeded to Thomas Waite of Punckatest five shares in the 13th lot and one share in the 11th lot at Punckatest Neck. William Manchester and Ephraim Turner witnessed the deed (Bristol Co. Deeds 4:78). On 28 February 1686/7 Benjamin Church of New Bristol in New England, for £36 paid by John Cooke Sr., inhabitant of Portsmouth on Rhode Island, deeded to him land on Punckatest Neck, the whole of the 10th lot which was laid out for 22 acres, which Church had bouht of Edward Gray of Plymouth and Arthur Hathaway of Dartmouth by Deeds dated 4 March 1679. George Sisson and Gilbert Magick witnessed this deed (Court Files, Suffolk, 42579).

On 29 March 1688 Jeremiah Browne of Newport and his wife Mary, formerly wife of Thomas Cooke Sr., deeded to John Cooke of Portsmouth for £39 ten acres in Portsmouth bounded on the east by land of George Sisson, north by Stephen Cornell, west by land formerly of Thomas Fish, deceased, and south by land of said John Cooke and the Common. Robert Little and Weston Clarke were witnesses (R.I. Land Evidence 1:211). This was evidently the ten acres which Thomas Cooke in his will had left to Mary for her own use." Very long Life Sketch. Image.


Mary Borden

1England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J7GQ-18Q. Image.

2England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJRN-PMK. Image.

3FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21863623. Image.

4Fiske, Jane Fletcher, 1930- (Main Author), Cooke,Thomas of Rhode Island : genealogy of Cooke alias Butcher of Netherbury, Dorsetshire, England (Boxford, Mass. : J.F. Fiske, c1987), 35, 36, JSMB US/CAN Book 929.273 C776f. "John Cooke was made a freeman of Portsmouth on 10 July 1648, when he was only eighteen years old (Early Records of Portsmouth, p. 39).  His name appears again on a 1655 list of freemen, and on the Conanicut Purchase agreement, dated 10 March 1656/7 at Newport, for 1/250th part of [Jamestown] Island (R.I. Archives).  On 14 May 1660 his parents deeded to him sixty acres of land in Portsmouth, using for both father and son the name "Cooke alias Butcher".  This deed in 1979 provided the necessary link inh discovery of the English origins of the family.

The ear mark for John's cattle was recorded 26 April 1668, as of fourteen years standing: "a crope one the left Eare and a hapene under the crop one the under side of ye Eare and a slitt on the Right Eare and a hapeny before or one the fore side of the same Eve," which, translated Into modern English, meant a crop (small out) on Me left ear with the brand of a halfpenny under it, and a slit on the right ear with the brand of a halfpenny In front of it (ibid, p. 277).

On 22 February 1665, John Cooke was among those Portsmouth men chosen to serve on a committee to make a rate (i.e. an assessment for tax purposes) of £100 to pay Dr. John Clarke (ibid, 131). Dr. Clarke had gone to England to obtain from King Charles II a new Royal Charter which would give the Colony much needed legal guarantees and freedoms; his efforts were successful and the General Assembly voted to pay his expenses and to give him an additional sum for his trouble.

John Cooke was chosen 17 October 1667, along with his brother Thomas, to be a grand juryman at the Court of Trials, a duty he performed again in 1669 and 1673. In 1670 he was a deputy to the General Assembly In Newport, and on 5 June 1671 was chosen a constable of Portsmouth (ibid., pp. 139,155,162).

On 3 June 1968 John Cooke and Daniel Wilcox were given the privilege of running a ferry at Pocasset. This was the ferry at the northern end of the island, sometimes called Howland's ferry, about where the Stone Bridge to Tiverton was later built.

On 20 March 1669/70 John Cook signed his mark to a receipt for "six hundred and three quarters and three pounds of good and merchantable barr Iron received from Capt. Thomas Leonard and James Leonard Jr. of Taunton in the county of Bristol upon ye account of Theodotious Moore chaynmaker of Boston in New England for the use of Jonathan Blackman of Little Compton in ye county of Bristol" (scrapbook in office of Taunton city clerk, p. 301).

John Cooke of Portsmouth on 22 August 1671 purchased from Thomas Burge of Newport one-sixth share of land in Dartmouth "at Acushnet Ponegansett" for 9.11, 5 shillings. He evidently owned land in New Jersey before 15 July 1673, when, calling himself yeoman, he deeded to Robert Gibbs of Punkatest in New Plymouth three-fourths of a share of land at Portapeage, N. J, the deed being witnessed by John Sanford and: Francis Brayton. This deed was annulled 24 January 1674 by mutual agreement (R.I. Land Evidences 1:30,31). In 1677, a warrant for 240 acres in the Monmouth Patent, "to be subsequently located and surveyed," was issued by the East Jersey Proprietors to Caleb Shrife (Shrieve) in the right of John Cook. (Edwin Salter, A History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties [Bayonne, N.J., 18901, p. 30], but the deed from Cook to Shrieve was apparently never recorded. Salter comments that many of those "to whom warrants were issued in 1675 or later had -been settlers for a number of years previous" (ibid., 28).

Zoeth Howland was murdered by Indians at Little Compton, and on 24 August 16761 John Cooke, aged about 45 years, testified that he "being at punckatest in the middle of July or thereabouts, did ask of severall Indians named as followeth,  Woodcock, Matocoat, and Job, whome they were that kil'd Zow Howland ... answer was that there was six of them in company and Manasses was the Indian that,_ fetched him out of the water" (Newport Court Book A, p. 30, Providence College, Archives).

Thomas Cook Sr. died in 1677 and sometime "in the year of 167811 John Coo k, Sr. signed a receipt for his Inheritance under his father's will, "of my mother-in-law [i.e. stepmother) Mary Cook as executrix to the estate of my deceased father Thomas Cook." Under the terms of the will, he received only one cow, {probably because his father had already given him land in 1660), and each of his children was to have one shilling.

On 30 April 1680 John Cooke of Portsmouth sold to Thomas Ward of Newport.  for £18, 5 shillings the land in Dartmouth that he had bought from Thomas Burge in 1671 (R.L Land Evidences 1. 134). Although he was not one of the original proprietors of the Pocasset Purchase In March 1680, whereby the area which became Tiverton was bought from Plymouth Colony, John Cooke on 24 November 16 80 purchased two shares in the Purchase from his son-in-law William Manchester, who owned five. Called John Cooke, Sr., of Portsmouth, yeoman, he paid £73:05:08 to William Manchester of Punckatest, yeoman, and his wife Mary (R.I. Land Evidence, 1:138). When the Great Lots were laid out, from the Sakonnet River eastward, John Cooke drew numbers 16 and 19.

On the same day that he bought the Pocasset land, John Cooke purchased one-half of thirteen shares of land lying in Punckatest Neck from William Manchester and his wife Mary for £60, it being land which Manchester had bought from Thomas Lawton of Portsmouth in 1877 (ibid.). On 17 July 1682 John Cooke, aged 51 years, and John Cooke Jr., aged 26 years, both of Portsmouth, testified that in March last they had witnessed the delivery of premises in Portsmouth deeded by William Browne of Salem, Mass. *to George Sisson. This deed, dated 11 February 1681/2, conveyed a 400 acre farm which had been given to Mehitable Brown, wife of Joseph Brown, by her father William Brenton. It was bounded on the south by land "late in the Teanure of Thomas Cooke senr. deceased and Westerly ... partly by the Land lately in Teanure of John Cooke senr. and partly by the land of the late Widow Cooke" (ibid., p. 160).

John Cooke Sen'r of Portsmouth and Mary his wife on 1 June 1686 deeded to Thomas Waite of Punckatest five shares in the 13th lot and one share in the 11th lot at Punckatest Neck. William Manchester and Ephraim Turner witnessed the deed (Bristol Co. Deeds 4-78). On 28 February 1686/7 Benjamin Church of New Bristol in New England, for 936 paid by John Cooke Sr., inhabitant of Portsmouth on Rhode Island, deeded to him land on Punckatest Neck, the whole of the 10th lot which was laid out for 22 acres, which Church had bought of Edward Gray of Plymouth and Arthur Hathaway of Dartmouth by deeds dated 4 March 1679. George Sisson and Gilbert Magick witnessed this deed (Court Piles, Suffolk, 42579).

On 29 March 1688 Jeremiah Browne of Newport and his wife Mary, formerly wife of Thomas Cooke Sr., deeded to, John Cooke of Portsmouth for E39 ten acres in Portsmouth bounded on the east by land of George Sisson, north by Stephen Cornell, west by land formerly of Thomas Fish, deceased, and south by land of said John Cooke and the Common. Robert Little and Weston Clarke were witnesses (R.I. Land Evidence 1:211). This was evidently the ten acres which Thomas Cooke in his will had left to Mary for her own use use."

5Wilbour, Benjamin Franklin, 1887-1964 (Main Author), Little Compton Families, Little Compton Historical Society, 1967 College Hill Press Providence, R.I., pp.205-206, FHL Film 844901 Item 1. "His will made 15 May 1691 and proved 25 May 1691: "To son John one hundred and fifty acres at Punketest with housing and four acres in Sapwet in LC reserving right of my son Joseph of getting hay at Punkatest for 15 head of cattle; to son Joseph housing and land where I now dwell in Portsmouth and four acres at Sapowet Marsh and son Joseph to pay his sisters Mary Manchester, wife of William, Elizabeth Briggs, wife of William, Sarah Wait, wife of Thomas, Hannah Wilcox, wife of Daniel and Martha Cory, wife of William, 10 punds each; to Deborah Almy, wife of William, 1 shilling; to Amey Clayton, wife of David, 10 pounds; and to each other sister (pg 206) there being six of them, a cow; to daughter Mary Manchester 10 sheep; to daughter Elizabeth Briggs a feather bed; to son Joseph negro man Jack for rest of life and Indian woman Maria to be his servant for 10 years and then freed, and Indian boy Joan Francisco to serve him till 24 years of age; to son Thomas a share of land at Pocasset, 20 sheep, etc.; to son Samuel land at Pocasset; to son John negro woman Betty and child; to grandauther Sarah Manchester a cow..."."

6Jane Fletcher Fiske 1930, Thomas Cooke of Rhode Island: a genealogy of Thomas Cooke alias Butcher, J.F. Fiske, c1987 , Page 16. "On 14 May 1660 Thomas Cooke, Senior, alias Butcher, of Portsmouth, deeded to John Cooke alias Butcher, "my sonne lawfully begotten of my owne body," about sixty acres in Portsmouth, "the west and upper end ajoyning to the common, the east and lower end ajoyning to the common and the south ajoyning to Captin Thomas Cooke's land and the north ajoyning to the land of the above named John Cooke which formerly I bought and purchased of the town of Portsmoth [I] grante freely and vollenteryly give and bestow for Severall Respects moving me there to [I] Resarve those priviledges to my Selfe viz. that I the above named Thomas shall have free Egress and Regress through the land for the convaience of timber or other occations that may consarn my Nessary ocations to my howse or land from the Common liberty to cut wood my wife Marie" surrendered her dower right, signing by a mark combining the initials "M" and "C"; Thomas signed with his mark, "T". The deed was witnessed by John Cranston and Peter Parker (Portsmouth LE 1:30). It was the wording of this deed, misunderstood over the years to mean that both Thomas and John Cooke were butchers by trade, that led finally to the discovery of the parish in England from which the family came." Image.


Samuel Cooke

1Fiske, Jane Fletcher, 1930- (Main Author), Cooke,Thomas of Rhode Island : genealogy of Cooke alias Butcher of Netherbury, Dorsetshire, England (Boxford, Mass. : J.F. Fiske, c1987), p.39, JSMB US/CAN Book 929.273 C776f. "He wss mentally incompetent and under the care of his brother Joseph, who was allowed £100 by order of the Superior Court at Bristol in 1701 for having maintained him for "ye space of tenn years" this amount to be raised from the profits of Samuel's land in Tiverton, "he being an idiott and not able to provide for himself." His father had left him the 19th Great Lot there, but with the restriction that he was not to have the disposal of it himself."


Matthew Borden

1Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, Joel Munsells Sons, Albany, N.Y. 1887. viii, 447 p., pg 23b. Digital version. Source Image. Citation Image.

2Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, pg 23a. Source Image. Citation Image.

3Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.

4FindaGrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21862867. Image.


Sarah Clayton

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21862915. "Daughter of Richard Clayton (1626-1677) and his first wife, Margaret ____ Clayton (d.1661). See “A Study of The Claytons of Monmouth County, New Jersey” which spells out the Cleaton/Clayton migration to America from England and their association with George Fox, 1624-1691, the founder of the Society of Friends at Swarthmoor Hall, near Aldingham Parish, Gleaston, Lancashire, England. Richard Clayton was a brother of Anne Clayton Easton Bull.

Children: Mary Borden, Matthew Borden Jr, Joseph Borden, Sarah Borden Hodgson, Ann Borden Slocum, Thomas Borden, Richard Borden, Abraham Borden, John Borden, and Benjamin Borden." Image.

2Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, Joel Munsells Sons, Albany, N.Y. 1887. viii, 447 p., pg 23b. Digital version. Source Image. Citation Image.

3Austin, John Osborne, Rhode Island, Genealogical Dictionary of; Comprising Three Generations of Settlers who came before 1690, pg 23a. Source Image. Citation Image.

4Joel Borden & Campbell Borden, Borden Family, A History of the, 1883. Image.


Benjamin Borden

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=21862632. Image.


Sarah Borden

1Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1600-1914, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V2H4-12W. Image.