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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Source Citations


John Neville

1Pedigree Resource File CD (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 1999), # 8, 11 Dec 1999. "After leaving Cowes, Isle of Wight, November 22, 1633, passengers of Lord Baltimore's vessels landed in Maryland the following March 25. In that company was John Nevil (2) not more than about 22 years of age.

John Nevill was among 15 "able men" transported by Leonard Calvert. As such a transportee, he apparently had certain obligations to fulfill before he could take his place as a "freeman". On March 24, 1637, he appeared before the Assembly and "claymed voice as freeman and was admitted". The record shows that immediately afterward he found himself on a jury in a murder trial in which the defendant was found guilty and promptly sentenced to be hanged. This
was the first of many cased in which our ancestor was plaintiff,defendant, witness, or juryman. And, later in Charles County, he acted nine times as attorney for others. (Archives, Volume 53 (published in 1936 page xliii . . .
It is clear from the land records of Maryland that John Neville was a planter residing at "The Clefts" on the west side of the Patuxent River, in St. Mary's County, now in Calvert, possessed of some means, for at least four years as a single man, and about fourteen years before he made any demannd upon the Lord Manor for lands due him under the law, for transporting himself in 1635 and his wife Bridget in 1639, into the Province of Maryland. "In 1639 he transported his first wife, Bridget Throsley, an English woman as appears from this affidavit dated November 8, 1659, in which he states he transported his said wife, Bridget, some twenty years previous. See Liber 4 Folio 186, of land warrants, land office, Annapolis, Maryland. "May 5, 1662, John Neville instituted suit by attachments against Duncan Bohannon for debt. (Chancery record for Charles County 1662) and in 1664 this suit was continued by counsel on accounty of the death of the plantiff. John Neville died January 7, 1664, as in July of this year his will bearing date January 7, 1664, was proved in which are mentioned his (third) wife Joanna and their son, William, and his daughter Ellen Lambert, now wife of John of Charles County, and appoints his son William and his son-in-law, John Lambert, executors. He doubtless had provided for his older children by deeds of gift orotherwise, hence no mention of their names in his will, this being a practice common in colonial times, where there were more than one set of children. See will which is recorded among the Povincial will records at Annapolis, Maryland."

Some family members claim that John Neville was from Durham, England and that he sailed with Lord Baltimore from Cowes England on the "Ark and Dove" and arrived at Point Comfort in Virginia on 24 Feb 1634. No proof was offered to suport this claim.

Dodson bk p.1218... progenitor of Neville family in America. Came with Gov. Leonard Calvert in the "Ark" and the pinnane "Dove" at the founding of the Maryland colony. Sailed from Gravesend, Eng. on 22 Nov 1633. First three
children by first wife, Bridget Thorsbey. Fourth child by second wife, Joanna Porter.

JP Barton message on Neville list 11/97:
Depostion of John Nevill 1644 mentions that "Anne, now wife of Ellis Beach, at some time in November 1642, at Snow Hill, did contract with him to carry her (Anne) to Elizabeth River in Virginia." MD Archives, IV, p. 269.

Although most of the depositions I've found on John [and posted a while back] say "Charles Co.," this does not. It's possible this deposition was presented to the provencial court in St. Mary's. 1642 the entire MD eastern shore was Kent Co. Anyone who has a map of the Bay can see that Snow Hill is at the head of the Pocomoke River, which
drained into the Pocomoke Sound, bordering Accomac Co. VA on the west. [York would have been an easy sw sail from there]

Col Francis Trafford may have been of York. [he is mentioned as a debtor to a York resident's estate settlement - but of course, he could have lived anywhere]

According to Harry Wright Newman in his book Flowering of the Maryland Palatinate, it appears Nevill may have been returning Trafford's boat, as Nevill goes on to say in his deposition that it took him three weeks to get back, not having transportation. Newman quotes the MD Archives - "carried Ann & Ellis Beach to Mr. Mottram's in York, and would have
carried them on to Elisabeth River, but no provisions were made for victuals. It was necessary for him to use all moral diligence to get passage back to Maryland..."

Newman adds "He was out of the Province for a time, perhaps under contract as a mariner, and returned bringing with him a wife, Bridget Thorsley. The Early Settlers of Maryland has - John Nevell, transported his former wife, Bridget Thorsby, about 1639. Also - John Nevell immigrated 1646 with wife. [this evidently, is where the story about John having a wife, Ann, between Bridget and Johanna, comes in - Newman only lists Bridget and Johanna.]

On Nov 14, 1649, he applied to the surveyor General for 200 a.of land by right of his own transportation and that of his wife in 1646. Accordingly, 400a. of land were issued to him under the name of "Nevill's Cross." [what happened to this land?]  By 1651 John had m. Johanna, claiming 100a. for her transportation Newman doesn't explain why he thinks Nevill was "out of the province," - perhaps he is basing his conclusion on the fact that John claimed his own transportation.

I think I agree with him, and see this as a vital bit of information. We don't know, and have no present reason to think John went to England to fetch Bridget. He may have made arrangements by mail. Whatever the arrangements, it seems more likely that he brought her into MD from VA - and that he must have spent a good amount of time in VA, if he was able to claim immigration land returning to MD. [I never have figured out just how long they had to establish residency in the other colony, before they could re-enter a colony and claim immgration rights,again - but it was not exactly rare.]  The point is - John shows a sure link between VA & MD, even if every connection is based on his mariner occupation, and we don't know that, for sure. It leaves a lot of room for speculation, and the more opinions offered, the merrier. Could he have claimed land for 1639, and again 1646? Sure - if he spent time living in VA, or went back to England.

Newman makes no claim for sons John & James. Every bit of data he gives , other then when he acknowledges supposition, is given a source, mostly the published Archives of Maryland series [72 vols].

Land Grants (in Isle of Wight County Records) William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 4. (Apr., 1899), pp 281-303.

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Page 281: V. Land Grants. (1) In the Land Office in the magnificant collection of the records of the Commonwealth grants from about 1626 to the present day. During the first century fifty acres were granted for the importation of every emigrant. The names of these "head-rights" generally appear under the grants.
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Page 300. Christopher Wade May 12, 1665, 300 acres adjoining theland of John Nevell and Robert Colemans." Submitted by Karen Johnson-Trouvat. 669384-121199075025. 12 Rue Seailles, 77630 Barbizon, France.


John Neville

1Pedigree Resource File CD (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 1999), # 8, 11 Dec 1999. "After leaving Cowes, Isle of Wight, November 22, 1633, passengers of Lord Baltimore's vessels landed in Maryland the following March 25. In that company was John Nevil (2) not more than about 22 years of age.

John Nevill was among 15 "able men" transported by Leonard Calvert. As such a transportee, he apparently had certain obligations to fulfill before he could take his place as a "freeman". On March 24, 1637, he appeared before the Assembly and "claymed voice as freeman and was admitted". The record shows that immediately afterward he found himself on a jury in a murder trial in which the defendant was found guilty and promptly sentenced to be hanged. This
was the first of many cased in which our ancestor was plaintiff,defendant, witness, or juryman. And, later in Charles County, he acted nine times as attorney for others. (Archives, Volume 53 (published in 1936 page xliii . . .
It is clear from the land records of Maryland that John Neville was a planter residing at "The Clefts" on the west side of the Patuxent River, in St. Mary's County, now in Calvert, possessed of some means, for at least four years as a single man, and about fourteen years before he made any demannd upon the Lord Manor for lands due him under the law, for transporting himself in 1635 and his wife Bridget in 1639, into the Province of Maryland. "In 1639 he transported his first wife, Bridget Throsley, an English woman as appears from this affidavit dated November 8, 1659, in which he states he transported his said wife, Bridget, some twenty years previous. See Liber 4 Folio 186, of land warrants, land office, Annapolis, Maryland. "May 5, 1662, John Neville instituted suit by attachments against Duncan Bohannon for debt. (Chancery record for Charles County 1662) and in 1664 this suit was continued by counsel on accounty of the death of the plantiff. John Neville died January 7, 1664, as in July of this year his will bearing date January 7, 1664, was proved in which are mentioned his (third) wife Joanna and their son, William, and his daughter Ellen Lambert, now wife of John of Charles County, and appoints his son William and his son-in-law, John Lambert, executors. He doubtless had provided for his older children by deeds of gift orotherwise, hence no mention of their names in his will, this being a practice common in colonial times, where there were more than one set of children. See will which is recorded among the Povincial will records at Annapolis, Maryland."

Some family members claim that John Neville was from Durham, England and that he sailed with Lord Baltimore from Cowes England on the "Ark and Dove" and arrived at Point Comfort in Virginia on 24 Feb 1634. No proof was offered to suport this claim.

Dodson bk p.1218... progenitor of Neville family in America. Came with Gov. Leonard Calvert in the "Ark" and the pinnane "Dove" at the founding of the Maryland colony. Sailed from Gravesend, Eng. on 22 Nov 1633. First three
children by first wife, Bridget Thorsbey. Fourth child by second wife, Joanna Porter.

JP Barton message on Neville list 11/97:
Depostion of John Nevill 1644 mentions that "Anne, now wife of Ellis Beach, at some time in November 1642, at Snow Hill, did contract with him to carry her (Anne) to Elizabeth River in Virginia." MD Archives, IV, p. 269.

Although most of the depositions I've found on John [and posted a while back] say "Charles Co.," this does not. It's possible this deposition was presented to the provencial court in St. Mary's. 1642 the entire MD eastern shore was Kent Co. Anyone who has a map of the Bay can see that Snow Hill is at the head of the Pocomoke River, which
drained into the Pocomoke Sound, bordering Accomac Co. VA on the west. [York would have been an easy sw sail from there]

Col Francis Trafford may have been of York. [he is mentioned as a debtor to a York resident's estate settlement - but of course, he could have lived anywhere]

According to Harry Wright Newman in his book Flowering of the Maryland Palatinate, it appears Nevill may have been returning Trafford's boat, as Nevill goes on to say in his deposition that it took him three weeks to get back, not having transportation. Newman quotes the MD Archives - "carried Ann & Ellis Beach to Mr. Mottram's in York, and would have
carried them on to Elisabeth River, but no provisions were made for victuals. It was necessary for him to use all moral diligence to get passage back to Maryland..."

Newman adds "He was out of the Province for a time, perhaps under contract as a mariner, and returned bringing with him a wife, Bridget Thorsley. The Early Settlers of Maryland has - John Nevell, transported his former wife, Bridget Thorsby, about 1639. Also - John Nevell immigrated 1646 with wife. [this evidently, is where the story about John having a wife, Ann, between Bridget and Johanna, comes in - Newman only lists Bridget and Johanna.]

On Nov 14, 1649, he applied to the surveyor General for 200 a.of land by right of his own transportation and that of his wife in 1646. Accordingly, 400a. of land were issued to him under the name of "Nevill's Cross." [what happened to this land?]  By 1651 John had m. Johanna, claiming 100a. for her transportation Newman doesn't explain why he thinks Nevill was "out of the province," - perhaps he is basing his conclusion on the fact that John claimed his own transportation.

I think I agree with him, and see this as a vital bit of information. We don't know, and have no present reason to think John went to England to fetch Bridget. He may have made arrangements by mail. Whatever the arrangements, it seems more likely that he brought her into MD from VA - and that he must have spent a good amount of time in VA, if he was able to claim immigration land returning to MD. [I never have figured out just how long they had to establish residency in the other colony, before they could re-enter a colony and claim immgration rights,again - but it was not exactly rare.]  The point is - John shows a sure link between VA & MD, even if every connection is based on his mariner occupation, and we don't know that, for sure. It leaves a lot of room for speculation, and the more opinions offered, the merrier. Could he have claimed land for 1639, and again 1646? Sure - if he spent time living in VA, or went back to England.

Newman makes no claim for sons John & James. Every bit of data he gives , other then when he acknowledges supposition, is given a source, mostly the published Archives of Maryland series [72 vols].

Land Grants (in Isle of Wight County Records) William and Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 4. (Apr., 1899), pp 281-303.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 281: V. Land Grants. (1) In the Land Office in the magnificant collection of the records of the Commonwealth grants from about 1626 to the present day. During the first century fifty acres were granted for the importation of every emigrant. The names of these "head-rights" generally appear under the grants.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 300. Christopher Wade May 12, 1665, 300 acres adjoining theland of John Nevell and Robert Colemans." Submitted by Karen Johnson-Trouvat. 669384-121199075025. 12 Rue Seailles, 77630 Barbizon, France.


Elizabeth Juatt Walker

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/67782273/elizabeth-warren. Image.


Rescome Sanford

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/109013592/restcome-sanford. Image.


Elizabeth Lake

1FindaGrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/109013738?search=true. Image.