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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Maj. John McDowell

BIOGRAPHY: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
Maj. John Mc Dowell was born 8 Dec 1757 and died in 1834/5. He moved to Lexington, Kentucky and was an ensign of the 12th Virginia militia on 30 Sept 1776. He was second lieutenant on 10 May 1777 and transferred to the 4th Virginia on 14 Sept 1778. He was a first lieutenant and regiment quartermaster on 7 Sept 1778 to the 12th Virginia, Feb 1779. He resigned 1 Dec 1779.
He was awarded land grants in Kentucky for his Revolutionary War service. John was a Captain in the Revolutionary war and served in Company 1 of Gen. Daniel Morgan's Rifle Regiment at the Battle of Saratoga. Morgan's rifle regiment was the first in the field and the last out of it. A report to Congress accorded the glory of the action at Saratoga entirely to the valor of the rifle regiment and corps of light infantry under the command of Col. Morgan on 19 Sept and Oct 1777. Morgan men were armed each with a rifle, tomahawk, and long knife. Their name was "the Corps of Rangers." They dressed in flannel shirts, some of buckskin. Their shirts were confined by a belt holding their knife and tomahawk. They wore caps on which appeared the words, "Liberty or Death." Morgan's Regiment was "the corps of the army that British Gen. Burgoyne was most afraid of." He was with George Washington at the crossing of the Delaware, at Princeton and Trenton, and starved and suffered at Valley Forge. He was wounded at Brandywine, and fought at Monmouth and Yorktown.
It is certain that he bought a lot in 1783 and brought his family to Kentucky in 1784, when he settled in Fayette County, Near Lexington. He was one of three majors commissioned by Shelby, immediately after the state was formed in 1792, the others being his brother, James, and John Morrison. He represented Fayette County in the first legislature held in Kentucky and was re-elected for six successive terms. He attained the rank of Major in the War of 1812.
Biography: Joseph married Miss Drake, a sister of the noted Dr. Daniel Drake. They had, among other children, a son who became a distinguished physician and surgeon. Joseph Nashe Mc Dowell was an eminent physician and surgeon, and founder of a medical college in St. Louis, Missouri.
1. Greenlee, Ralph Stebbins and Greenlee, Robert Lemuel, Genealogy of the Greenlee Families in America, Scotland, Ireland, and England, Privately Printed, Chicago, Illinois, 1908, p. 623.


Susan Hart Shelby

GIVEN NAMES: Also shown as Susannah


Charles M McDowell

BIOGRAPHY: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
"Brigadeer General Charles Mc Dowell was born 28 Oct 1743 in Winchester, Frederick Co., VA. He died 31 Mar 1815 in Morganton, Burke Co., NC. He was buried at Quaker Meadows, Burke Co., NC. He was in Rutherford's campaign against the Cherokees. He and his younger brother Joseph were at Musgrove's mill and King's Mountain. The highest ranking and most influential military leaders from Burke County were the Beekmans and the McDowell brothers, Charles (1743-1815) and Joseph (1756-1801. Their father, Joseph McDowell, Sr., (1715-1775), not a Revolutionary officer, lived at Quaker Meadows as did Colonel Charles. Captain, (later, Major) Joseph (1758-1795) of Pleasant Gardens (son of Hunting John was also a distinguished Revolutionary War officer.
As a general in the Revolutionary War, Charles commanded a regiment of soldiers from Burke and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina. Colonel Charles was conspicuous in organizing the expedition to King's Mountain, but gave the actual lead to younger men. His troops fought at the battle of King's Mountain, although he was not present during the battle. He served as the commander of forces which captured and destroyed a fort on June, 1780 at the Pocolet River. He commanded with Gen. Isaac Shelby at Cedar Hill. He commanded forces at Musgrove Hill and Cave Creek.
After Western North Carolina became the field of military operations in 1780, General, then Colonel, Charles McDowell, the senior officer of Burke County, displayed courage and capacity as a leader in several local engagements with the Tories., who were numerous and troublesome in this section. He, in conjunction with Shelby, Sevier and Clark attacked, and defeated the Tories in a fortified position on the Pacolet River. McDowell was also attacked and routed the Tories at Musgrove's Mills, on the Enorree.
Colonel Charles McDowell was the ranking officer at King's Mountain, or was entitled to the command of the forces by virtue of the fact that the battle was fought in his district. He was sent by the council of officers to Salisbury for General Sumner or General Davidson.
There was no question about McDowell's pluck and judgment, but the tradition is that the other field officers, including his brother, intended, when they had induced him to start for Salisburey, to bring on an engagement immediately. While brave and patriotic, Colonel McDowell, sometimes, at a critical moment, like many other generoius men, yielded to his fondness for strong drink, and his associates prudently, therefore, determined to take no risks on that occasions.
His army was disbanded in Sept. 1780 and he resigned his commission. Previously he had been under duress from charges brought against him for mistreatment of Tories and confiscated property dealings. Out of fifteen counts, eight of which he was found guilty, two charges were dropped, several verdicts were modified. He was found not guilty on five counts. The final verdict was that he was to be relieved of his command and replaced by Joseph McDowell of Quaker Meadows.
Following decision of the court martial proceedings, the findings were reviewed by General Rutherford. He felt very strongly that Colonel Mc Dowell was a brave and resolute officer and a good one. He also felt, however that he had erred somewhat in judgment, but that he should not be removed from his command. General Rutherford then drafted a letter addressed to the members of the General Assembly asking that McDowell be restored to command. His presentation must have been an impressive one. Not only was Colonel McDowell restored to his command, but a new district was created - Morgan District. Of several names that were placed in nomination to head the military district, the one selected was none other than Charles McDowell. In May 1782, he assumed his new command as Brigadier General of Morgan District.
He married Grace Greenlee Brown. His sons, Ethan Allen and Charles Gorden married respectively, Ann Gordon and Lucinda Jones.
He continued to support the patriots by manufacturing powder with the help of his wife, Grace Grizzel and secretly carrying it to the army for use at the battle of King's Mountain on 7 Oct 1780. He served as a member of the North Carolina state senate from 1782 to 1788 and was a member of the North Carolina House of Commons from 1809 to 1810. He was a man of some wealth and great prominence. After he no longer wore his uniform, he did, on occasion wear velvet knee britches with silver buckles at the knee, and silver buckles on his shoes.
After the close of the war, the people of this country showed their confidence in him and regard for his rank and services, by sending him to the Senate from 1782 to 1788, both inclusive. He died in the year 1815, full of honors and of years.

Through him many have joined the Daughters of the American Revolution.
His gravestone at Quaker Meadows Cemetery reads:
Sacred
to the memory of Gen.
Charles McDowell
a Whig Officer
in the Revolutionary War
who died as he had lived
A PATRIOT
the 31 Mar 1815
Aged about 70 years

1. The King's Mountain Men: pp. 204-205.
2. Draper, Lyman, King's Mountain and It's Heroes, History of the Battle of King's Mountain, October 7th 1780, Dauber and Pine Bookshops, Inc., New York City, 1929.
3. Lossing, Benson I., Field Notes of the Revolution, Harpers, New York, pp. 425, 426, 431, 434.
4. Maddox, Joseph T., and Carter, Mary, North Carolina Revolutionary Soldiers, Sailors, Patriots and Descendants, Volume I, Georgia Pioneers Publications, P.O. Box 1028, Albany, Georgia, 31702, p. 137.
5. Phifer, Jr., Edward William, Burke, The history of a North Carolina County, 1777-1920 with a glimpse beyond., Privately published by Edward William Phifer, Jr., 425 South King Street, Morganton, North Carolina 28655.
6. DAR records.
7. Catawba Journal obituaries.
8. Ervin, Eunice, Under the Forest Floor, 1997.
9. Anonymous, Western North Carolina, Historical and Biographical, A.D. Smith and Company, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1890, pp. 90-92, 111, 221-222, 232-238.


Grace Grizzell Greenlee

BIOGRAPHY: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
"Grace Grizzel Greenlee was born 23 June 1750 in Winchester, Frederick Co., Virginia. She died 18 May 1832. She was the daughter of James Greenlee and Mary Elizabeth McDowell (1707-1809) in Rockbridge Co., VA. Her mother was the first white woman to settle on Borden's Tract in Virginia. Grace was the widow of John Bowman who was killed at Ramsours Mill.
Her gravestone at Quaker Meadows cemetery reads:
Sacred to the Memory of Grace M'Dowell
Consort of Gen. C. M'Dowell
Who died the 18 May 1823
In the 73rd year of her age
Once engaged in scenes of Life
A tender mother and loving Wife
But now she's gone and left Us here
The lesson bids us all prepare.

The story of Grace Greenlee McDowell, like her gravestone is timeworn and seldom contemplated. The short pamphlet biography written by William Carson Ervin and published by the North Carolina Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution at the turn of the century is out-of-print. She was christened Grizel (Grissel or Grizzel) an old Scottish name, held in the McDowell family since their days in Scotland.
Grace was born in a log cabin in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, settled by her parents two families in 1737. Grace was five years old when the French and Indian War erupted and during its long course, many people who were neighbors to her family abandoned their log cabin homes and forsook the valley. Others, like the Greenlees and Mc Dowells, stayed on and suffered the loss of family members and friends.
Her father decided that it was his duty to settle his daughter for life and he promised her in marriage to a wealthy landowner much older than she. It is obvious that Grace must have assented to this old world custom, though perhaps reluctantly. In describing her first wedding day, her biographer said....that the wedding trousseau was prepared, the wedding feast in readiness, and that the ceremony had actually progressed to the point where the bride-to-be was asked if she would take the ancient bridegroom for "better or for worse," when she electrified the guests by a most emphatic, "No." Be that as it may have been, another wedding day did come when Grace was not a reluctant bride, for that day she married John Bowman, the young man of her choice. After coming to North Carolina with her husband, he was mortally wounded at the battle of Ramsours Mill and subsequently died.
Upon hearing of her husbands grievous wounding, Grace rode horseback carrying her little daughter, Mary "Polly" with her. She followed "dim trails through the South Mountains, " in a race with death and reached her wounded husband a short time before he died. She buried her husband near where he fell, and in deep grief rode to her home again with little Polly a comforting burden in her arms. With her mare, on her return journey, she set her own pace. To face her grief and in an effort to say goodbye, she may have written the eulogy subsequently attributed to her when it was found later among Bowman papers:

Like the rising sun in the morn, He went away, left me forlorn
And saw the tears I shed; My boding heart did then foretell
That fated evening heard the knell That my dear John had bled.
Tears that must ever fall. For ah no lights the past recall,
No cries awoke the dead.
Weap not Polly for I will be A mother and father unto thee oh.

She came home to her role as a new widow and mother to Polly and a woman with lands to till and no man in the house, but slaves to plant and harvest for her. She became a planter and from the fruit of her fields and the fields of others became a procurer of supplies for the rebel Whigs and their unofficial quartermaster with wagons of food and supplies going for their need. She had her encounters too, with local Tories and sometimes bested them. Her biographer records that "on one occasion... she pursued some Tories who had plundered her home... and compelled the robbers, at the point of a musket, to give up her property....
Another story is that on one occasion some of Tarleton's troopers carried away some of the Bowman horses. This courageous woman rode into the British camp some miles away and demanded her horses from the officer in charge and was allowed to bring them back in triumph. In the fall of 1782, she married her cousin Charles Mc Dowell and went to live at McDowell Station (Quaker Meadows) and most assuredly shared the house with Margaret O'Neill McDowell, her mother-in-law. Grace was to bear five Mc Dowell children.
"Senators, judges, soldiers, lawyers, leaders in business and the professions are her sons. Brilliant and beautiful women are her daughters."
Grace Greenlee Bowman McDowell was 32 years old when she married Charles and "though it cannot be said with certainty that she lived happily ever after, the wilderness girl, after the end of the second war she had experienced, their nearness to her almost participation became for her time and area a Great Lady." Her biographer hoped that she had some silken dresses for he knew that her new husband wore on occasion velvet knee britches with silver buckles at the knee and silver buckles on his shoes.
1. The King's Mountain Men: pp. 204-205.
2. Draper, Lyman, King's Mountain and It's Heroes, History of the Battle of King's Mountain, October 7th 1780, Dauber and Pine Bookshops, Inc., New York City, 1929.
3. Lossing, Benson I., Field Notes of the Revolution, Harpers, New York, pp. 425, 426, 431, 434.
4. Maddox, Joseph T., and Carter, Mary, North Carolina Revolutionary Soldiers, Sailors, Patriots and Descendants, Volume I, Georgia Pioneers Publications, P.O. Box 1028, Albany, Georgia, 31702, p. 137.
5. Phifer, Jr., Edward William, Burke, The history of a North Carolina County, 1777-1920 with a glimpse beyond., Privately published by Edward William Phifer, Jr., 425 South King Street, Morganton, North Carolina 28655.
6. DAR records.
7. Catawba Journal obituaries.
8. Ervin, Eunice, Under the Forest Floor, 1997.
9. Anonymous, Western North Carolina, Historical and Biographical, A.D. Smith and Company, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1890, pp. 90-92, 111, 221-222, 232-238.


Hugh Charles McDowell

WILL: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
"Will of Hugh Mc Dowell, Will Book 7, page 465, February 15, 1772, Hugh Mc Dowell of Rowan County, North Carolina, out of love for his wife, Jane, and other good reasons, gives her until she should remarry a mare, saddle, bridle, feather bed, and furniture, and a Negro man named Ceaser, until Mary McDowell becomes of age, then he desires that the place be sold and the money put out at interest and proceeds divided among the three children (who are Margrate, Hannah, and Mary). She may have one of the four cows and each of the three girls get one also - the rest of the cattle are to be sold, money put out on interest and when the girls of age to be divided among them as are the pewter, pots, beds, and c. Wants the girls sent to school. If Henry Highland (who was bequeathed to me by his father) continues good and dutiful until of age and remains at the home, he may have a horse worth ten pounds, a saddle, bridle, two suits of apparel out of my estate, one years schooling, loom and tackling, a beaver hat (which I give to brother Joseph) a decuroy coat and the use of the plantation tools. Samuel Lapsley is debtor to the estate of Hugh Mc Dowell 18 pounds which I allow to clear my land from debt. Appoints wife, Jane (unless she remarries) and brothers Charles and John McDowell to be trustees. Witnessed by William McBride, J.P. and David Nilson and proved in May, 1772. Inferior Court, May 5, 1772, "A deed of Gift from Hugh McDowell to Jane McDowell in trust for Margret Mc Dowell, Mary Mc Dowell and Hannah Mc Dowell for Sundry things therein contained, dated 15 February 1772, proved by William McBride, N. B. Charles Mc Dowell and John Mc Dowell, Appd Trusteed for the Complyance afsd".


Joseph William McDowell

BIOGRAPHY: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
"William/Joseph Mc Dowell was born about 1668 probably in Londonderry, Ireland. He possibly lived in County Antrim, then moved to County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. He emigrated to Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania with his sons and brother and died in Pennsylvania. He is thought to have been buried in Christ Church Cemetery in Philadelphia, along with his wife Ruth Ann Roberts Mc Dowell. The Raloo Churchyard in County Tyrone is the resting place for many of the Northern Ireland McDowells of this family. Some evidence exists that his name was William Joseph or Joseph William and that he may have lived for a time in Cecil Co., Maryland along with at least his son, Charles' family. Ruth Anne (Roberts) McDowell is buried at Christ Church burial ground in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania."


Capt. Joseph McDowell

BIOGRAPHY: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
"Capt. Joseph McDowell, Sr. was born in 1715 in Donegal, Northern Ireland and died 27 Feb 1771 at Quaker Meadows near Morganton, Burke Co., North Carolina. He immigrated from Ireland to Pennsylvania in 1737. Joseph was raised as a weaver in Northern Ireland; he was a planter in America. A Scots Presbyterian, he married an Irish Catholic "Princess" of The O'Neills of Antrim and Tyrone. It was reported that they fled Ireland due to the displeasure her family felt over her marriage to a Protestant, a weaver, and a Scot. Captain Joseph attained his rank in the French and Indian Wars. He first settled in Lancaster Co. Pennsylvania, then Wincester, Frederick Co., VA where his children were born. Joseph, Margaret and family finally removed to North Carolina to be near his brothers' families - Charles (deceased) and "Hunting" John McDowell of Pleasant Gardens around 1762. Earlier upon arriving in Virginia, he had purchased land from his older brother Charles (1700) in Winchester, Frederick Co., VA. Note: The Church records say he moved his family about 1774, locating on Richland Creek.
A letter from Maj. George Washington during the French and Indian Wars to Lt. Joseph McDowell, an officer in Capt. Rutherford's Rangers, of June 17, 1758:
Sir: Capt. Stephen assuring me, that so soon as the Prince William Militia are taken from his House, the Families there, and in the Neighborhood also will immediately remove; I am obliged, having it no other ways in my power to Order a few of your Men to be station'd there in their place: you are not to put so many there as to distress the other Posts you secure; and if (Capt. Van) Swearingen's Division can afford you any for this place, I shall take care to Order some accordingly. I am,
G.W.(George Washington)
A few months later, in September, 1758, Joseph was still listed as a Lieutenant in Frederick (Orange) County Militia. From Oct., 1761, he served as a Captain in the Virginia Militia, and fought as a Ranger with Major George Washington at Braddock's defeat during the French and Indian war. In Oct., 1761, he was still listed as Captain in Captain in Virginia's Frederick (Orange) County militia. On 30 Sep 1750, Joseph and his wife, Margaret O'Neill McDowell received a grant of 400 acres of "land on Rocky Creek that runs into the Catawba, below Davison Creek about a mile below where the Indian path crosses the said creek...." in North Carolina. This land was sold to John McDowell of Anson Co., NC on 17 Sep 1759. On the same date, Joseph and Margaret sold an additional 370 acres on the north side of the Catawba granted to Joseph McDowell 31 Mar 1750 to the same John McDowell (his brother Charles' son).
By 1762, Joseph and Margaret were among the earliest settlers in the Catawba Valley of Burke County, NC. They settled on land referred to as McDowell's Station and later Quaker Meadows - west of present day Morganton. The Collet Map of 1770 shows Quaker Meadows, the home of Joseph McDowell.
Joseph and Margaret had three sons who fought in the Revolutionary War. The most famous of these was General Charles McDowell (1743-1815). Nearly as well known was Col. Joseph O'Neill McDowell (1756-1801), known also as "Quaker Meadows Joe" to distinguish him from his cousin, "Pleasant Gardens Joe", the son of "Hunting" John McDowell, Joseph McDowell's brother. A third son, Maj. John McDowell (1751-1822) also served. General Charles McDowell and this Quaker Meadows Joseph McDowell were also delegates to the constitutional conventions of 1788 and 1789 along with Pleasant Gardens Joseph McDowell. Of the three, "Quaker Meadows Joe" was the only one to vote against the constitution, until the proposed Bill of Rights was approved. This same Joseph later served as a U.S. congressman in the Third and the Fifth congresses.
Joseph McDowell's will was dated 16 Mar 1770 and proved Nov., 1771. This is in conflict with the headstone for Capt. Joseph McDowell at the McDowell Cemetery, Quaker Meadows, NC, which gives his death as 27 Feb 1773, aged 65 years. An abstract of his will states: wife: Margaret, sons: Hugh, Charles, John (underage), Joseph (underage) land on Silver Creek, to daughters: Elizabeth McKinnie (McKisick) and Hannah Chrisman, 5 pounds each. Executors: wife (Margaret), sons, Hugh and Charles. Witnessed by: Philip Price, Abram Scott, Joseph Dobson LaGroon.
Inferior Court Minutes in Salisbury, November 5, 1771, "The Last Will and Testament of Joseph Mc Dowell was proved in Open Court by Abram Scott and Orderd that Letters Testamentry be Granted to Hugh McDowell one of the executor therin Names and Order of Sale."
Wednesday 6 Nov. 1771, "This day came in Open Court Hugh McDowell and William Moore, Esqr. and Took the Oath by Law Appd for there Quallification of Justice of the Peace and Subscribed the Test.""
1. Fitzpatrick, John C., The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799, Vol. II.
2. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, Earl Greg Swem, Library Call no. F262. R9;48.
3. Rankin, Rev. S. M., History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People, page 45.
4. Will Abstracts, Rowan County, North Carolina, Vol. I, 1753-1805, A:99.
5. J. P. McLean, "Scotch Highlanders in America"."


Virginia Margaret O'Neill

BIOGRAPHY: Information sent to T.Mason on 30 May 2004 by Norma Coon.
"Virginia Margaret O'Neil (O'Neal) McDowell was born 1723 in Castle O'Shane in County Antrim, Ireland and died in 1790. Margaret was a striking woman, intelligent, articulate and with a tendency for speaking her mind with a deep rooted hatred of the English. She is buried at Quaker Meadows, Burke County, North Carolina. "Prior to the Battle of King's Mountain, where Charles and Joseph McDowell were leading figures, men from Colonel Ferguson's army visited Quaker Meadows and ransacked the house, appropriating the clothing of Charles and Joseph. They told the boys' mother, Margaret, who presided over the house, that when they caught Charles they would kill him outright. Joe, they would kill on bended knees after humiliating him by making him beg for his life. Margaret, far from being intimidated or overawed bade them be careful lest all the begging should be done by themselves. Margaret, by her defiance of the Tories, is one of the few women recognized by the Daughters of the American Revolution as being a patriot of the Revolution."
1. Fitzpatrick, John C., The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799, Vol. II.
2. College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, Earl Greg Swem, Library Call no. F262. R9;48.
3. Rankin, Rev. S. M., History of Buffalo Presbyterian Church and Her People, page 45.
4. Will Abstracts, Rowan County, North Carolina, Vol. I, 1753-1805, A:99.
5. J. P. McLean, "Scotch Highlanders in America"."


Linda Sue Stapleton

I, T.Mason have receive wonderful help from Linda Armstrong. On 20 Jan 2007 Linda wrote, "I'm a retired Library Technician and spent years trying to build a quality database from people who had input such incredible junk. Melvil Dewey would come back screaming."