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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Olive Borden

Biographical sketch written by Carrie-Anne on FindaGrave.
"Actress of the silent and early sound era. Contrary to urban legend, her original name was not Sybil Tinkle. She began her career as one of Mack Sennett's bathing beauties in 1922 and in 1925 was named one of the thirteen WAMPAS Baby Stars of the year. Her fame and popularity continued to increase after she signed a contract with Fox Studios, and she soon was regarded as one of the most beautiful women of the era and celebrated for her long pitch black hair. She appeared in a variety of films, among them comedies, Westerns, horror films, and dramas. Among her film credits were 'The Overland Limited' (1925), 'Fig Leaves' (1926), 'The Monkey Talks' (1927), 'Gang War' (1928), 'The Eternal Woman' (1929), 'The Social Lion' (1930), and 'The Mild West' (1933). She left Fox Studios in 1928 because she refused to take a pay cut, though she was still very popular and was able to find work at other studios, such as Radio Pictures and Columbia Studios. Throughout the Twenties she also worked with a number of famous directors, such as Leo McCarey, Howard Hawks, and John Ford. When the movie industry transitioned to sound, she had to change the types of characters she played because of the way her voice sounded. Frequently she had played Vamps, exotic types, and sophisticated society women, but those sorts of characters did not match the type of voice she had. In the films she made in the early Thirties, Olive played characters who were younger and more modern. Her final film appearance, 'Chloe, Love Is Calling You,' came in 1934. Like many once-popular stars of the silent era, she also found her popularity waning and was viewed as a relic from the distant past. Following her retirement from the screen, she struggled to find a permanent job, and also had many personal problems with failed love affairs, stress, and substance abuse. In 1943 she joined the Womens' Army Corps, and after receiving her discharge, she tried to restart her movie career, but it didn't work out. By 1946 she had been reduced to cleaning floors, and the next year died of a stomach ailment in the Sunshine Mission, a Los Angeles home for destitute women. (bio by: Carrie-Anne) "

HYPERTEXT: [ http://www.oliveborden.com ] Please review long story. "Olive was a talented actress who learned how fleeting fame can be. She was a kind woman who never found true happiness in her life. Her story is one of Hollywood's most tragic tales."


Olive Borden

Biographical sketch written by Carrie-Anne on FindaGrave.
"Actress of the silent and early sound era. Contrary to urban legend, her original name was not Sybil Tinkle. She began her career as one of Mack Sennett's bathing beauties in 1922 and in 1925 was named one of the thirteen WAMPAS Baby Stars of the year. Her fame and popularity continued to increase after she signed a contract with Fox Studios, and she soon was regarded as one of the most beautiful women of the era and celebrated for her long pitch black hair. She appeared in a variety of films, among them comedies, Westerns, horror films, and dramas. Among her film credits were 'The Overland Limited' (1925), 'Fig Leaves' (1926), 'The Monkey Talks' (1927), 'Gang War' (1928), 'The Eternal Woman' (1929), 'The Social Lion' (1930), and 'The Mild West' (1933). She left Fox Studios in 1928 because she refused to take a pay cut, though she was still very popular and was able to find work at other studios, such as Radio Pictures and Columbia Studios. Throughout the Twenties she also worked with a number of famous directors, such as Leo McCarey, Howard Hawks, and John Ford. When the movie industry transitioned to sound, she had to change the types of characters she played because of the way her voice sounded. Frequently she had played Vamps, exotic types, and sophisticated society women, but those sorts of characters did not match the type of voice she had. In the films she made in the early Thirties, Olive played characters who were younger and more modern. Her final film appearance, 'Chloe, Love Is Calling You,' came in 1934. Like many once-popular stars of the silent era, she also found her popularity waning and was viewed as a relic from the distant past. Following her retirement from the screen, she struggled to find a permanent job, and also had many personal problems with failed love affairs, stress, and substance abuse. In 1943 she joined the Womens' Army Corps, and after receiving her discharge, she tried to restart her movie career, but it didn't work out. By 1946 she had been reduced to cleaning floors, and the next year died of a stomach ailment in the Sunshine Mission, a Los Angeles home for destitute women. (bio by: Carrie-Anne) "

HYPERTEXT: [ http://www.oliveborden.com ] Please review long story. "Olive was a talented actress who learned how fleeting fame can be. She was a kind woman who never found true happiness in her life. Her story is one of Hollywood's most tragic tales."


James Chambers

Charlotte Chambers, the wife of Dennis M. Thomas was 3rd Great Grand Aunt to T.Mason. She was daughter to Andrew Jackson Cambers, the son of James Chambers.


Benjamin Atchley

Letter by Marusa Chambers Atchley written on 13 Sep 1932 in Sevierville, Tennessee. "My husband is a Alchley too so you see two Alchleys married Chambers. Benjamin Atchley that married Martha Patsy Chambers was his Great Grandfather. My husband is cashier of the Sevier County Bank."


Martha Palsey Chambers

Letter by Marusa Chambers Atchley written on 13 Sep 1932 in Sevierville, Tennessee. "When my father was killed my brother was 18 1/2 years. My Father left a Farm so my Grandmother McMahan came and kept house for us and my mother's bro and my bro ran the farm and I have heard my Grandmother and I have often heard her tell that my Fathers Aunt Martha Palsey Chambers Atchley came to our home and she was displeased with her husband's will and was preparing to enter suit against her children and they taken her to town 1/2 mile and my Grandmother said she died before the suit came up so evidently she must have died later that 1875 as my Father was dead at that time."

Information sent to T.Mason on 29 Dec 2010 by Steve Elder. "Martha (“Patty”) Chambers, wife of Benjamin Atchley I, is said to have been born near the line between what is now Tennessee and North Carolina, near the source of the Little Pigeon River. She is said to have been a daughter of James and Elizabeth Chambers. She was a devout Christian and a member of Providence Baptist Church. As described by one of her grandsons who recently died, she was of blonde type, had fair skin, blue eyes, light wavy hair and late in life weighed approximately two hundred pounds. She was a very lovable and good-natured woman. She died during October, 1875, at her home in Sevier County, as a result of heart failure.
Her mother’s maiden name is said, by some in Tennessee, to have been Jackson, while many of her descendants in Oklahoma state her name was Daugherty. While what is stated here was given me by her grandson, Reverend Robert Houston Long, I have heard from several sources of this Cherokee blood in the veins of the descendants of Martha Chambers Atchley. The mother of Martha Chambers is said to have been Elizabeth Daugherty, a full blood Cherokee and daughter of James Daugherty who was a full blood Cherokee, and who lived in the border-land between Carolina and what is now Tennessee. The multitude of descendants of Martha Chambers, who later resided in the Indian Territory and Oklahoma, proudly boast of their Cherokee Indian descent. Numbers of them, old and young, were enrolled as Indians, and were allotted claims which they settled upon. In the particular case of Reverend Robert Houston Long, he showed me shortly before he died, copies of documents and testimony presented about sixty year ago to the Indian Agency and the Indian Court of Claims at Talequah, which evidence was accepted by the Government, and based on which proof several of the Long family who are descended from the wife of Benjamin Atchley I were granted tracts of land in Indian Territory. The physical description of Martha Chambers, given above and which was furnished to me by Reverend Robert Houston Long from his personal remembrance of his grandmother, is somewhat at variance with the general physical description and appearance of the typical Cherokee Indian. In this I do not mean to dispute any of the sources referred to."


Captain James W. Chambers

See letter in scrapbook of Marusa Chambers Atchley written on 13 Sep 1932 in Sevierville, Tennessee. "... and a Bro in this county Captain J.W. Chambers was a Mexican soldier and a Captain in the Confedacy a Brilliant man I often visited him. he could have gave me every thing relative to my family if I had used the good judment to have got it..."


Jane Chambers

See letter in scrapbook of Marusa Chambers Atchley written on 13 Sep 1932 in Sevierville, Tennessee. "My father had another sister Jane Chambers Thomas who with her Family later moved to Giles Co. M. Tenn."