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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Benjamin Borden

NICKNAME: Fairfax Ben
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SOURCE ERRORS:

Hopewell Friends history, 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia : records of Hopewell Monthly Meetings and Meetings reporting to Hopewell, two hundred years of history and genealogy. By Joint Committee of Hopewell Friends, John Walter Wayland, Hopewell Monthly Meeting (Society of Friends) Family History Library US/CAN Film 833338 Item 2
[ http://books.google.com/books/about/Hopewell_Friends_history_1734_1934_Frede.html?id=9zUkpoA7Xl0C ]

In this document is an incorrect citation where on page 26, it says "Benjamin Borden was born in 1692, a son of Benjamin Borden and ---- Grover, near Freehold, N.J., and died in Frederick County, Va., in 1743. He married Zeruiah Winter of Wes New Jersey, and came to Virginia sometime in 1732. ..."

CORRECTION: Benjamin Borden was NOT born in 1692. He was born to Benjamin Borden and Abigail Grover in 1675. The Benjamin Borden who was born in 1692 was born to John Borden and Mary Walker Earle.
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ERROR: Hattie L. Borden Weld in "Historical and Genealogical Records of the descendants as far as known of Richard and Joan Borden, who settled in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, May 1638 with historical and biographical sketches of some of their descendants"; 1638-1899; Joel Munsell, Albany, NY, 1899; pg74; Family History Library Film 0000512 states  "that this man was born in 1692 in Portsmouth and was a son of Thomas." On page 83 she indicates this Benjamin died in 1728 and he married Suzanne ____ and had no children."
CORRECTION: Weld's records were incorrect in this point.
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ERROR: In William Nelson, New Jersey biographical and genealogical notes from the volumes of the New Jersey archives, with additions and supplements; Originally published: Newark, [New Jersey] : New Jersey Historical Society, 1916. FHL US/CAN Film 16508. "Page 44: "Benjamin, b. April 6, 1675." The section on page 44 seems accurate. But when turning to page 45 it says "Administration on the estate of Benjamin Borden, of Evesham township, Burlington county, yeoman, was granted June 6, 1728, to Susannah Borden, his widow... ."
CORRECTION: Susannah (Page) Borden was married to the father of Benjamin Borden. Documentation of the spouse and widow of Benjamin Borden may be found in the notes which follow and in the court records for Zeuriah (Winter) Borden. (paper copy with matls from Doris Lockhart filed - Benjamin Borden)
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ERROR: Zella Armstrong, Notable Southern Families (Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore, 1974.), pgs 23-31, G929.2. Printed from Family Archive Viewer CD191, Broderbund Software, Sep. 17, 2000.
"On page 23 Zella Armstrong indicates that the Benjamin born of John and Mary (Earle) Borden was married to Jerusah and settled Borden's Manor in Virginia.
CORRECTION: Armstrong confused him with this first cousin. Benjamin was born in 1675 and his cousin Benjamin who was born in 1692 had the parents of John and Mary (Earle) Borden"
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LIFE SKETCH: Genealogist J.A. Kelly wrote the following in the William And Mary Quarterly in October 1931 on page 325, "Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer". "... That he was honest, intelligent, ambitious and enterprising is evident; no less so that the natural limitation imposed upon him by his primitive environment thwarted his plans for his own career and for the future of his family. ... His first recorded appearance in Virginia was apparently on January 21, 1734, when he was appointed one of the justices of the newly formed county of Orange. From that time till his death in 1743 his name appears frequently in land transactions in various parts of the Shenandoah Valley. His most important enterprise was the settlement of "The Patent for Borden's Great Tract" which was granted to him from King George II on 6 November 1739 by William Gooch Esquire, the Lieutenant Governor at Williamsburg, Virginia for 92,100 acres in what later became Rockbridge County." Parcels of this land became the campuses for Washington and Lee University and Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.
  [Many unproven legends and inaccurate information about his birth date, parents and how he obtained this land abound.]
  Benjamin Borden's father, Benjamin, was born at Portsmouth, Rhode Island May 16, 1649. In 1665 Benjamin settled on some of his father's lands in Monmouth County, New Jersey where he held elective positions. His father married Abigail Grover September 1, 1670, who died January 8, 1720. His father then married Susannah Page who administered his estate in 1728. Benjamin's brother, Joseph (1687-1765) was the first English child born in Portsmouth and was the founder of Bordentown and a leading citizen of New Jersey. The father of Benjamin's mother was James Grover, who was active in the settlement of East Jersey. He was one of the grantees of the Monmouth County patents in 1663.
  Benjamin was born in Monmouth County, New Jersey April 6, 1675 where he resided before moving to Freehold, Virginia. He died in 1743 near Winchester, Virginia about the time of his appointment as one of the original justices of Frederick county. His wife, Zeruiah Winter was his cousin, being a daughter of of William Winter who married Hannah Grover, the daughter of the James and Rebecca Grover. He and Zeruiah had (three sons and seven daughters), all except the youngest born in Middletown, New Jersey.
  The Fifth Lord Fairfax married the daughter of Lord Culpepper and by this alliance obtained possession of Culpepper grants in Virginia that had been issued by James II of England to Culpepper, for lands known as the "Northern Neck" which included ten counties in lower Shenandoah Valley. Borden was Lord Fairfax's agent in America and was therefore known as "Fairfax Ben". Benjamin's home plantation known as "Borden's Great Spring Tract" of 3143 acres, granted him 3 Oct 1734, which shared a boundary Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax, on the S-E. Borden's house stood at or near the present residence in what is now Clark County. In September 1737 Fairfax Ben Borden became anxious to establish the boundary lines of his land grant. He had agreed to deed to each resident settler 100 acres of land and promised the privilege of buying land at the rate of 50 shillings for 100 acres. Each cabin meant 1000 acres granted to Borden. James McDowell, was educated & grew to manhood in Ireland. He had located in Borden's Grant in the spring, and raised a crop of corn on the South Fork of the Shenandoah near Woods's gap. One night, Benjamin Borden, came up and asked leave to spend the night there. Borden exhibited documents which satisfied the McDowells he held the grant for the large body of land, and he offered to give one thousand acres to anyone who could help. Assisted by James Wood, Orange Co. surveyor, when Borden left the grant in 1739, having secured his grant, he committed his interests largely to John McDowell, who attended to them in his absence.
  John McDowell and his wife, Magdalene, then were responsible for bringing into the grant most of the 92 original families in 1738-1739, and the deed for the grant was recorded in 1739 for a total of 92,100 acres. John McDowell with eight of his men, on December 25, 1742 fell into an ambush and was killed by indians. Just about a year later his widow married Benjamin Borden III.
   It seems Benjamin followed the pattern of land speculation of his father. There is documentation of purchases from 1700 through 1743 by him and his wife, Zeuriah. At the time of his death he possessed approximately 130,000 acres of land in Virginia and New Jersey. In his will he leaves his lands in New Jersey as well as land in Bullshire, Smith's Creek, North Shenandoah and James River, except 5000 acres which is devised to his daughters, Abigail Worthington, Rebecca Bronson, Deborah Borden, Lydia Borden and Elizabeth Borden; other legacies and devises to sons: Benjamin, John and Joseph; and his wife, Zeuriah and daughter Marcy Fearnley, the Wife of William Fearnley. In 1746 Zeuriah, on account of bodily infirmities, resigned and Benjamin took the estate. In April 1753 Benjamin Borden III died.
   Lawsuits and counter suits between the daughter Lydia, who married Jacob Peck, and her descendants vs. descendants of her brothers and sisters, regarding the settling of the estate, continued for about one hundred and fifty years. Records concerning this legal battle are said to fill a filing cabinet in the Clerk's office at Staunton (Augusta County, formerly Orange County), Virginia. Benjamin Borden, because of his close and profitable relationship with Lord Fairfax, is referred to as "Fairfax Ben" in these legal records. Affidavits and other records in this file are of much value in tracing descendants of Benjamin and proving the relationship between the White County Burdens and the earlier generations of the Borden family.

CHILDREN: N.J. Arch.; ; Vol.2, p 362; NOTE: All children except youngest born in Middletown, Monmouth; N.J.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH: (25 Mar 1701)
N.J. Archives.; Vol.2, p.362. Court of Sessions of Monmouth, New Jersey; EXTRACTION: "One Moses Butterworth who was accused of piracy (sailed) with Captain Kidd, who was bound to appear... During examination Willet said Governor & Justices had no authority & he would break up trial. Signaled to armed men to rescue prisoner. Benjamin Borden & Richard (his brother) took hold of the prisoner at bar and tried to take him by force, and were wounded in the scuffle. The other men in the company rescued the two Bordens and tore to bits the examination papers of the prisoner. The prisoner escaped and 100 men held the Governor & the Justices, the King's Attorney General and the sheriff and clerk of the court for 5 days. Later this group (Borden, Capt. Safety Grover, James Grover and William Winter), all relatives, petitioned the King of England to appoint a suitable person as Governor."

FOLKLORE: There is a story below which researcher Pixy Lynn Overstreet-Morgan states she is presently searching for the SOURCE of. It is title "the Buffalo Calf story." She has searched over 60 references so far (as of Aug, 2000) and hasn't found the origin yet. The answer may be found in the court documents and depositions taken in Virginia from individuals who were involved in the Borden estate settlement during the 1700s and 1800s.

The Buffalo Calf story is also discussed in "A history of Rockbridge County, Virginia" by author Oren Frederic Morton who states "A silly story has been repeated time after time to the effect that Borden and Lewis visited the capital with a buffalo calf and presented it to Governor Gooch, causing that dignitary to be so tickled as to sign away the title to 100,000 acres of public domain. ... Gooch, who was one of the best of the colonial executives, was too sensible a man to be carried off his feet by the present of a shaggy, ungainly, and ungrown beast. As for Borden, he was not the man to lead the calf all the way to Williamsburg, without feeling some assurance that the chldish proceeding would be worth his while. A colonial land-grant, like the one made in favor of Borden, was on stipulated conditions and with the concurrence of the Colonial Council.
  It is now in place to tell how and for what announced purpose such a large grant came to be made to a private person who was without aristocratic birth or connections." The long story told by Morton starts on page 26 of his historical record and continues through page 32.

[ See: http://www.tmason1.com/other/a_history_of_rockbridge_county_virginia.pdf ]

COMMENT: Research done by Pixy Lynn Overstreet-Morgan given to T.Mason, Sep,2000: Professor John Alexander Kelly is a Borden descendant and author who wrote articles for the Clarke County Historical Association and the Genealogies of Virginia Families, Vol 1, A-Cl, p. 399 and a series by William and Mary Quarterly in 1950. Mr. Kelly also supplied information for the book, The Sevier Family History Book, by Cora Bales Sevier and Nancy Sevier Madden in 1960. Another outlet for his research was the book written by Ralph and Mildred Branson Wandling, The Ancestors and Descendants of Thomas and Rebecca Borden Branson, 1960. Mr. Wandling's daughter has reprinted the book, the title which is called "A Family of Adventurers 1066-1996, Colonists- Loyalists- Rioters- Rebels- Pioneers, Branson-Borden, Edition II, c1997. Page 64 of the reprint, after giving information about Professor Kelly's ancestry, has this to say about him.."Prof. John A. Kelly was the genealogist of the Borden and Branson families. In his searching he made statements concerning the "Urban Legends" that have grown up around Benjamin Borden and his tenure in the Virginia colony. One stated that he could not find the "origin" of the Buffalo Calf story that has been around Benjamin Borden land dealings. The earliest copyrighted reference for the Buffalo Calf story was an 1874 book, "Good Old Times in McLean County, Illinois", by E. Duis. It was the version where Benjamin didn't present the calf to Governor Gooch, but sent the poor animal all the way to England to be presented to the Queen of England, Elizabeth. As Mr. Kelly put it, the author of that calf story had their English monarch are wrong by about a century.

It is unfortunate for the descendants of Benjamin Borden to be told a story that no reputable author has ever researched out and several have stated they don't believe it ever happened. MORTEN's book, History of Rockbridge County, c1920 has a version of the story. WADDELL's book, Annals of Augusta Co. has the same version and PEYTON's book, History of Augusta Co. has the same story. It appears ALL these authors copied from one another, and none bothered to check out the validity of that story.

MORE-FOLKLORE: The following is another story which is not documented by fact.
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BIOGRAPHY: (1734-44) THE WOODS-McAFEE MEMORIAL; ; Los Angeles, CA. public library; EXTRACTION: Borden was an Englishman, who emigrated to New Jersey and engaged in Mercantile business. The Fifth Lord Fairfax married the daughter of Lord Culpepper and by this alliance obtained possession of Culpepper grants in Virginia that had been issued by James II of England to Culpepper, for lands known as the "Northern Neck" which included ten counties in lower Shenandoah Valley. Borden was Lord Fairfax's agent in America and was therefore known as "Fairfax Ben". Borden became intimate friend of Wm. Gooch, Gov. of Virginia. In is said that in 1734 while on a visit to Williamsburg, he made friends with John Lewis, founder of Staunton, Va. who was so pleased with Borden's business sagacity, enterprise and social qualities that he invited him to an extended visit at the Lewis home in Augusta county.

So, according to Waddell's Annuals of Augusta County, Virginia, and Withers' History of Western Virginia, Benjamin Borden, came up from Williamsburg by invitation, in the spring of 1736, on a visit to John Lewis. It is said that he took with him, on his return, a buffalo calf, which he presented to Governor Gooch, and was so successful in ingratiating himself with the Governor as to receive the Royal Patent for a large body of land in the valley, south of the Beverly Manor. This tract of land which was granted to Benjamin Borden consisted of 92,100 acres in what is presently Rockbridge County, Virginia.

Benjamin went to Europe in 1736 (NOTE: There is no evidence that he went to Europe between 1730 through 1743) and brought back or induced to follow him, at least one hundred families. He agreed to deed to each resident settler 100 acres of land and promised the privilege of buying land at the rate of 50 shillings for 100 acres. Each cabin meant 1000 acres granted to Borden. He picked the right sort of people to become American pioneers and patriots. Margaret Lewis (daughter of Lord of Loch Lynn and wife of John Lewis wrote, "There be some among them who are of the established church, but most of our neighbors are Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. Our people in the Valley are of most staid habits and priciples, and they are very diligent in business. They commence their Sabbath on Saturday, when the sun goes down, while I think it is a shame to not have a hot turkey for my Sunday dinner." The first settlers on Borden's Manor were Ephraim Patton, Andrew Moore, Hugh Telford, John Matthers, the Prestons, the Paxtons, Lyles, Grigsbys, Stewarts, Wallaces, Wilsons, Caruthers, Campbells, McClungs, McRaes and others who became the founder of some of Virginia's distinguished families.

In September 1737 Fairfax Ben Borden became anxious to establish the boundary lines of his land grant. James McDowell brother to Captain John, was educated & grew to manhood in Ireland. He had located in Borden's Grant in the spring, and raised a crop of corn on the South Fork of the Shenandoah near Woods's gap. One night, Benjamin Borden came up and asked leave to spend the night there. Borden exhibited documents which satisfied the McDowells he held the grant for the large body of land, and he offered to give one thousand acres to anyone who could help. Assisted by James Wood, Orange Co. surveyor, when Borden left the grant in 1739, having secured his grant, he committed his interests largely to John McDowell, who attended to them in his absence.
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LAND: (1700) Hist. of Burlington and Mercer Counties; p. 454; EXTRACTION: 8Jan1700 bought 1000 acres from Anthony Woodward in Grest Docwra Patent, south of Arbeytown.

LAND: From research records of Pixy Lynn Overstreet-Morgan given to T.Mason, Sep,2000:
(1705 & 1706) William Nelson indicates Monmouth Co. N.J. records list Benjamin as the agent for the receipt of the Monmouth Co. taxes.

(16 Apr 1711) Crosswicks, Monmouth, N.J. Bk D. p 202 indicates a road was to be built next to a field owned by Benjamin. His father was a Freehold overseer of roads, a commissioner, at the time. Crosswicks was also the name of a creek.

(1 May 1713) Freehold Twp, N.J. Bk K-2, p 154; Benjamin Jr. of Freehold Twp. Yeoman with wife, Zeruiah, consent of Hannah Winter, late wife to Richard Gardiner dec. of Middletown.

(28 May 1715) Philadelphia Deed book F-5; p. 297; EXTRACT: Benjamin Borden of Township of Freehold in County of Monmouth bought 1200 acres of land near Montatawny, on the east side of the Schoolkil River; this transaction was recorded 10 Aug 1731.

(28 May 1717) Eversham, Burlington, N.J.; Benjamin Jr. is one of the subscribing witnesses to Deed of Sale of 400 acres from his father, Benjamin, Yeoman, of the township of Eversham, Burlington Co. to his son, Joseph.

(19 Aug 1721) Philadelphia Deed book I; p. 552; 19Aug1721 sold 500 acres of land near Schuilkill River in Montatawny, Philadelphia County for 100 pounds to Thomas Rutter which is what they had paid for the original 1200 acres.

(1734) Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer: His Ancestry and Descendants by J.A. Kelly; (1931); 2nd Series, Vol. VI, p 259-264; from GENEALOGIES OF VIRGINIA FAMILIES from the William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine (1982) Genealogical Pub Co., Baltimore; ; EXTRACT: Benjamin is said to have been a justice of Spotsylvania Co, but the published records of that county make no mention of his name. His first recorded appearance in Virginia is apparently on 21 Jan 1734 when he was appointed one of the justices of the newly formed county of Orange. (Virginia Magazine of History, Vol. XIII (1904-06), p 351.) On 18 Feb 1734 Orange County Order Book 1, p 8 indicates Benjamin Borden took his Oath of a Justice of the Peace along with others.

LAND: (1734) Ralph & Mildred Branson Wandling, ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS & REBECCA BORDEN BRANSON; 1380-1950; 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; ; LDS Family History Library Film 0928077, item 11; EXTRACT: Benjamin's home plantation known as "Borden's Great Spring Tract" of 3143 acres, granted him 3 Oct 1734, which shared a boundary Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax, on the S-E. Borden's house stood at or near the present residence in what is now Clark County.

LAND: From research records of Pixy Lynn Overstreet-Morgan given to T.Mason, Sep,2000:
(3 Oct 1734) Benjamin Borden bought 1122 acres Land Patent (Patent Bk, p 328) with Andrew Hampton and David Griffith. Bullskin Run on Sherando river adjacent to Edward Meloy on S side of Bullskin Run. Another source states that this tract was on the Bullskin Marsh near Summit Point, now W.Va.

(12 Nov 1735) Land Patent Bk 16, p 369. 850 acres near Round Hill adjacent Thomas Babb land in the Opeckon area. Another source indicates this land lies on the western slope of Apple Pie Ridge in Frederick Co. Abstracts of Frederick County Deeds, Bk 1, 1742-1748, p 193 indicates 710 acres of this patent was sold 7 Feb 1744 to Arthur Barrett.

LAND: (3 Nov 1737) Virginia Magazine, Vol XIV, 1906, p 15; This Board was petitioned bye Benjamin Borden setting forth the unforseen accidents and difficulties which have prevented their seating one hundred thousand acres of land granted them on the West Side of the Blue Ridge Mountains on the branches of James River by a former order of this Board & praying further time for settling the said tract. It is ordered further time be granted for one year from the date hereof.

His Excellency issued the grant dated October 6, 1739 of 3143 acres which became known as Borden's Manor and was later known as "Borden's Great Spring Tract" (this area now in the city of Lexington, Va. is Washington & Lee University and Virginia Military Institute); the original grant to Benjamin Borden for this great tract can be found in the Washington and Lee Library.
REFERENCE:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_and_Lee_University

Benjamin Borden also had 1132 acres (now Summit Point West Virginia) and on 8 Nov 1739 a patent (Patent Book 18, p 360) for 92,100 acres was granted to Benjamin Borden Jr. late of the province of East Jersey, who then resided in Orange Co., Virginia. It was on the N and NE branches at the head of James River at Rockbridge Co. it being a corner to Beverley Manor Tract, on W side of the Blue Ridge, on the E. side of the Road to John McDowell's, on the S side of the bark Cabin branch; down the E side of Wood's Spring Branch, near another Spring branch; crossing the W side of Hay's Cr. corssing a branch of Moffet's cr. near a sping of James R. crossing a branch of Sherrando. The famous Natural Bridge is located on the tract. In consideration that Borden caused to be imported and settled on the land herein mentioned one family for every 1000 acres.

LAND: From research done by Pixy Lynn Overstreet-Morgan given to T.Mason, Sep,2000:
(1739) In Rockbridge Co. Va, in addition to the Borden Great Tract, Benjamin also acquired 400 acres on forks of Buffalo and North Branch, 400 acres near Spreading Springs Branch, 400 acres under the foot of Blue Ridge, on a branch of the James River called Mary, 8100 acres south side of James River north east boundary on Catawba creek which later became border of Botetourt Co. Va.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH: (6 Nov 1739) Benjamin Borden, Shenandoah Valley Pioneer: His Ancestry and Descendants by J.A. Kelly; (1931); 2nd Series, Vol. VI, p 259-264; from GENEALOGIES OF VIRGINIA FAMILIES from the William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine (1982) Genealogical Pub Co., Baltimore; ; EXTRACT: His most important enterprise was the settlement of "Borden's Great Tract," a grant to him from George II dated 6 Nov 1739, of 92,100 acres in what later became Rockbridge County (Morton's "History of Rockbridge County" (1920) pp 21-32, 343-350, 549-551).

LAND: Research done by Pixy Lynn Overstreet-Morgan given to T.Mason, Sep,2000:
(Mar 1740) 3553 acres on Catawba Creek, VA patent book 19, p 478 (later occupied by his granddaughter, Martha Borden Hawkins. (p 475) 2880 acres on lower tract in Augusta, on the W side of the Blue Ridge of Mountains & on a branch of James River called Catawba Cr. in consideration that Benjamin hath lately caused to be imported and settled on the land herein mentioned one family for 1000 acres. Reference was Bk 18, p 876.

VA Patent bk 18, p 914. 400 acres on forks of Buffalo and North Branch W side of the Blue Ridge of mountains in the fork made by the North Branch of James river and Buffalo creek, N side of a draft.

Va Patent bk 18, p 910. 400 acres near Spreading Springs Branch W side of the Blue Ridge of Mountains and on a branch of James river near the Broad Springs Branch. 400 acres under the foot of Blue Ridge of Mountains on a branch of the James river called the Mary.

(17 June 1742 through 22 Oct 1743) 9 different sales of Borden Manor deeds noted in Deed books 7 & 8.

Benjamin, Jr. also had a tract of 1132 acres on Bullskin Marsh near Summit Point, now W. Va., and a large tract on Smith's Creek, near new Market, Shenandoah County, Va. (Ibid.)

LAND: Bob Baker Goff, The Burden Family of White County, Tennessee and their Bourdoon-Borden Ancestry; 1380-1980; ; Knoxville, Tennessee; pp 10-13; EXTRACT: Benjamin's home plantation joined the boundary of Greenway Court, the home of Lord Fairfax,and stood at or near the present residence of Thompson Sowers, Esq., in what is now Clark County, Va. (Hopewell Friends History, Frederick County, Virginia, p. 25).

LAND: (1744) Ralph & Mildred Branson Wandling, ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS & REBECCA BORDEN BRANSON; 1380-1950; 53 pages quoting research by John A Kelly of Haverford College, Penn, pub 190-, filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, 1976; ; LDS Family History Library Film 0928077, item 11; EXTRACT: Hopewell Friends History; ; p 25; Frederick, Va. Benjamin, Jr. also attained 850 acres upon the western slope of Apple Pie Ridge in Frederick.County, and 750 acres of that tract were sold by Benjamin Borden, Jr., his son, and Zeruiah Borden, his widow, on February 7, 1744 to Arthur Barrett. In this deed the grantee is referred to as "Benjamin Borden, Gentleman, late of Orange County, Colony of Va., deceased". Neither Benjamin, Jr. nor his family ever resided on this tract, which appears to have been one of Benjamin Senior's many speculations in land.

Information from Pixy Morgan to T.Mason on 5 Feb 2009. Benjamin Borden's sons, Benjamin, John, and Joseph also knew Lord Fairfax because they were in the county militia together. "After Benjamin died, and after Zeruiah passed, the three boys divided up the home estate three ways. John sold his land to Lord Fairfax, who had taken up residence at his Greenway Court estate which shared a border with the Borden home plantation. Joseph also sold his portion to Lord Fairfax. After Joseph's brother, Benjamin perished from the smallpox, Joseph went and lived with his Rogers relatives."

APPOINTMENT: Abstract of Frederick Co. Orders, Bk 1, 1742-1745, p 1. Was appointed as one of the original justices of Frederick Co. Commissions as justices for the county issued by Lt. Governor William Gooch on 22 Oct 1743. Borden did not attend nor take the oath of office on 11 Nov 1743.

WILL: Will Book I, p 4 & 5, Frederick County Circuit Court, Winchester, Virginia; 1632-1800; Dated 3 Apr 1742, proved 9 Dec 1743, Virginia Wills and Adm, compiled by Clayton Torrence; Gen. Publishing Co., Baltimore 1978. Pg 43 - Frederick Co. VA.; copy in possession of T.Mason (filed - B. Borden); At the time of his death, he possessed approximately 130,000 acres of land in Virginia and New Jersey. ABSTRACT: Leaves his lands in New Jersey as well as land in Bullshire, Smith's Creek, North Shenandore and James River, except 5000 acres which is devised to his daughters, Abigail Worthington, Rebecca Bronson, Deborah Borden, Lydia Borden and Elizabeth Borden; other legacies and devises to sons: Benjamin, John and Joseph; and his wife, Zeuriah and Daughter Marcy Fearnley, the Wife of William Fearnley. Fearnley refused to be executor, was accepted by Benjamin and Zeuriah. In 1746 Zeuriah, on account of bodily infirmities, resigned and Benjamin took the estate. In April 1753 Benjamin Borden Jr. died. John and Joseph, in 1753 conveyed their interest to Mr. William Russell. Benjamin Borden Jr. had a daughter Martha who was an infant in 1753.

EXTRACTION:
"IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN the third day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and forty-two I Benjamin Borden of Orange County in Virginia, yeoman, being in Good state of health and of Sound mind & Memory thanks be to God for it therefore calling unto Mind the Mortality of my Body I do make this my last Will and Testament that is to say, Principally & first of all I give and recommend my Sole unto God that gave it and for my body I recommend it to the Earth to be buried in a Christianlike Manner at the Discretion of my Ex'rs. nothing doubting but the General Reserrection I shall receive the same agin by the Mighty Power of God and touching such Worldly Estate it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life I give and Dispose of the same in a Manner & form following IMPRIMIS I will all the funeral charges & my just Debts should be paid and satisfyed

ITEM I give and bequeath to Zeruiah Borden my wife all the Improvements & what Lands she has or shall have ocation to clear as long as Shee Remains my Widow & if she should get Married then shee shall have but half of the Improvement and what Land shee and her husband should have ocation to Clear of this Plantation I now live on in Orange County in Virginia in Spought Run During her Natural Life.

ITEM I give & bequeath to my son Benjamin Borden & my son John Borden & my son Joseph Borden to them and their heirs & assigns for Ever this Plantation And the Lot on the said Spought Run that my Mill Stands of the One Hundred & fifty acres that I have agreed to Rent to my said three Sons to be Equally divided between my Son Benjamin & my Son John & my Son Joseph Borden in quality to be devided by way of Lots drawing between my Sons Benjamin & John & Joseph Borden Guardians, that is all this Plantation I now Live on Excepting Eight Hundred Acres I give to Edward Rogers and his Wife Hannah Rogers and the heirs of her Body for Ever, and Five Hundred Acres I give William Fearnley & my Daughter Mercey his Wife to them & their Heirs for Ever.

ITEM I give to my Daughter Hannah Rogers but five shillings she having her posion before.

My will is all my Lands and Estate that I have in New Jersey should be sold & all of my Land at Bullskin & my Land on Smith Creek & North Sherrando & all my Enterrys every where and all my Lands on the Waters of the James River should be Sold excepting Five Thousand Acres of Land that is all good I give to five of my Daughters that is - Abigal Worthington and Rebecca Branson and to Debourah Borden & Liddy Borden & to Elizabeth Borden that is one Thousand Acres of good Land appease to every one of the five Daughters above mentioned to them & their heirs & assigns for Ever.

All the rest of my Land to be sold aforesaid Excepting this I now live on to be all sold and Equally devided between my Wife & my Son Benjamin & my Son John & my Son Joseph & my Daughter Abigal Worthington & Daughter Rebecca Branson & my Daughter Mercey Fearnley & my Daughter Deburah Borden & my Daughter Elizabeth Borden & my Daughter Liddy Borden & my Movable to be devided between my said Wife and Sons Benjamin & John & Joseph Borden & my aforesaid Six Daughters Abigal, Rebeckah, Mercey, Deburah, Liddy & Elizabeth Borden.

First before my Movable Estate be Devided there must be taken out my Grate Brown Riding Horse & my Bay Mare that come of my Grate hip shot Mare and the best Bed with furniture be it good that I have in the House that I give to my Wife first & all the rest to be Equally between my Wife & my aforesaid three Sons & my six Daughters as aforesaid devided.

I Constitute and Apoint my Wife Executrix & my Son Benjamin Borden & my Son-in-law William Fearnley Executors to this my Last Will & Testament & to Execute deeds for the Land I have Sold & ordered to be Sold this Will I poublish to be my last Will & Testament & all other Wills made by me void.
Signed, Benja. Borden

The will was proved in Frederick County, Va. Court on Friday, October 9, 1743. Law suits and counter suits between the daughter Lydia, who married Jacob Peck, and her descendents vs. descendents of her brothers and sisters, regarding the settling of-the estate, continued for about one hundred and fifty years. Records concerning this legal battle are said to fill a filing cabinet in the Clerk's office at Staunton (Augusta County, formerly Orange County), Virginia. Benjamin Borden, Jr., because of his close and profitable relationship with Lord Fairfax, is referred to as "Fairfax Ben" in these legal records. Affidavits and other records in this file are of much value in tracing descendents of Benjamin and proving the relationship between the White County Burdens and the earlier generations of the Borden family.

HISTORY: John Lewis Peyton, HISTORY OF AUGUSTA CO, VA; 1824-1896; Samuel M. Yost, Staunton, VA. 1882; ; Filmed by Genealogical Society of Utah, Family History Library Film 0030313

HISTORY: Joseph A. Waddell, Judge, ANNALS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA; 1726-1871; C.R. Caldwell, Staunton, VA. 1901; pg 16,398-400; Family History Library Fiche 6015418-6015424;

HISTORY: Col Thomas Marshall Green, HISTORICAL FAMILIES OF KENTUCKY; ; 1889, Cincinnati, ISBN 0-8063-7958-8; pg 14-15,78; Family History Library Book 976.9 D2g 1982;

REF: Virgil Lewis, "History of West Virginia"
REF: Diary of Margaret Lynn Lewis.
REF: 1841 Knox Co, TN Court Minutes, Vol 17, p 68.
REF: Borden Autin, "Benj Borden & Borden Grant"
REF: The Old Monmouth of Ours by Moreau Brothers.
REF: Deposition of Mrs. Mary Greenlee in 1806 in Borden case.
REF: George Braden Roberts, GENEALOGY OF JOSEPH PECK & SOME RELATED FAMILIES; ; State College, PA. 1955; ; Family History Library Book 929.273 P334r, Fiche 6049146


Zeruiah Winter

She was Benjamin Borden's first cousin. Zeruiah's mother was Hannah, who was a sister of Abigail Grover. Abigail was the wife of Benjamin Borden Sr. and the mother of Fairfax Ben.

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Michael S. Cole, [HYPERLINK http://www.thecolefamily.com/hobby/ahnentafel.htm#ahnentafel ] ; ; copy dated 26 Jan 1994 sent to T Mason; NOTES: Indicates she remarried 1746/8 to Joseph Wright. (1748 Prince Wm Co, VA Deed Book L, p 92-94). (Shenandoah Valley Pioneers...," p 411). Info from Una Bowman, Oneida, IL.


William Ferguson

WILL: Book Halifax Co., N.C.; p 130; Gen. Abstr. Wills 1758-1824 - wit: Matthew Rabun, Thos. Motley, Wm. Hudway.


Jane Warren

She & her step sister (who was the grandmother of Governor William Raburn) are said to be nieces of Gen. Joseph Warren, hero of Bunker Hill. Mrs Raburn was an ancestor of Mrs. Governor Northern.

REF: Rowland Taylor: Davis, "The Shenandoah, p 41, 44: Weld, "Borden Geneal.", p 74-8; Waddell, "Annals of Augusta Co., VA, supl., p 398-9; Wm & Mary O. v. XI, pp. 325-8; VMH&B, XIII:351-3; Wilson, "Tinkling Spring", p 18-20; Gwathmeny "12 Va. Cos. (Augusta)", p 361-70; Kelly, "Clarke Co Hist. Assn", 13:77; Wandling, "Ances. & Desc. Thos. & Rebecca Borden Branson"; "Jos. Habersham Hist. Coll.", pp 498-9


Robert Warren

BIOGRAPHY: Richard Gookins, 2838 Evergreen Ave. NE; Salem, OR 97303 - May 1993; copy in possn of T.Mason (file - Robert Warren) Pg. A312; EXTRACT: will prob. June Court 1759. Married first to Hannah, as she joined with Robert in a real estate transaction as late as Feb 1732 (Bell, Colonial Bertie records. p186); Married 2d, about 1739 to Margaret Dawson (which see). In the will all the girls were called "Warrin" indicating they were unmarried when their father's will was made - undated but statement of ill-health suggests shortly before death before June 1759. There is no suggestion of a male heir nor a deed of gift to a son; daughters were not left real property in those times if there was a surviving son or grandson.

In some biographical material including History of Baldwin Co, GA written by Anna Maria Green Cook (1925), he is reported to have been a professor  at William and Mary College in Williamsburg, VA.

REF: Bertie Co., N.C. was formed from Chowan Co.; Edgecombe Precinct. N.C. was formed from Bertie Co. in 1732 and Edgecome County formed in 1741; the Edgecomb precinct records are in Halifax Co. (11 entries)

DEED: Robert Warren & wife Hannah to John Mitchener 980 a. 300 pds, two tracts: (1) plantation where Joseph Warren now lives on Horse Swamp adj. John Barfield, Thomas Sturges. containing 340 acres and (2) 640 A. formerly bought of John Williams adj. Lazarus Thomas at White Oak Swamp adj. John Early formerly granted to Aron Oliver. March 11, 1719-20. Wit: Thomas Hansford, Bridgett Hansford, May Court 1738 (Bertie Co. NC Deed Book E p 253)

LAND: Phillip Rayford & wife Martha to Robert Warren, Oct 9 1722, 7 pds for 200 a. on SS Morractucky River on Conaconaro Swamp adj. Nathaniel Holly. Wit: John Gray, David Bunn. May Court 1723 (Bertie Deed NC Book A p90) (note: David Bunn is father of Benjamin m. Millison)

COURT: Arrears of Quit Rents - 29 Sept. 1729 to March 1732. Warren, Robert (in part) 1100 A

DEED: #1914 pg. 409. Robert Warren. 17 February 1737; 640 acres in Edgecombe County on the N. side of Beach Swamp, joining the sd. swamp Robert Warren; 7-26-1743. 170 acres Edgecombe County on the N. side of Tarr River opposite of Robert West, joining the river bank

DEED: Edgecombe, NC Deed Book 03-499, 13 Jun 1750. Capt Robert Warren to WILLIAM CANE for 25pds, 85a on lower half on n side of Tar River part of pat to Robt Warren 26 Jul 1743. s/Robert Warren. w/ Edward Moore, Jno Bradford.

DEATH: William Goodwyn and wife Tabitha of Edge.co. IN 1758 sold 280 acres to Geoge Dawkins on Beech swamp and Robert Warren and Richard Whitaker were witnesses.

DESCENDANCY: Warren Clearinghouse-Depository-Exchange Feb 15, 1993 Issue # 14, pg92; Robert Warren married Margaret Dawson. He died before June court 1759 in Edgecombe Co. North Carolina. Four children mentioned in his will. Then four daughters and husbands, some children listed with inquiry addressed to Mary J. Gilbert, Route # 2, Box 63, Woodbury, Georgia 30293.

REF: Goodwin, Ellis M., Isaiah Warren ...; LDS FS 1033595-2; Children from Rebecca Harris, Memphis, Tenn Oct 1984; land transactions from papers of Mrs. Richard B. Wasson, Birmingham, Alabama;


Capt William Saunders

RESEARCHER: Fay B Kitchens sent informtion to T.Mason in Sep2001. History of Hancock Co. V I, p. 35 Ordinance Minutes, Inferior Court, Sparta, GA (1800-1837). Solomon's land was sold at a Sheriff's sale in 1797 for "due debts." Solomon was buying land in 1800 in Hancock Co., GA. In 1806 his brother William was witnessing a land purchase. Solomon was buying land from a Benjamin Borden. In 1816 Mary Saunders was listed as an admr. of William's estate and was selling some of the land to Solomon.

RESEARCHER-OBITUARY-CONFLICT: Information sent to T.Mason on 30Oct2002 by Joyce Jackson of Bedford, TX. "Capt. William Saunders, an old and respectable pilot of Savannah, June 7, 1796." This death date conflicts with other.


Mary Borden

WILL: WB A, pp. 109-10

After William's death, Mary deeded land to David Kendall, and he and Shepherd Saunders and some members of the Jackson family then started the Arnold Academy at Yatesville, Georgia, about 1830.


Richard Joseph Sasnett Jr.

MILITARY: letter from Elizabeth (Betsy) deParry to TMason, 27Jun1999; ; EXTRACT: Private in Capt. Joseph Borden's Command of Mounted Riflemen under General Morgan and participated in battles of Kings Mountain, Cowpens and Guilford Courthouse.

MARRIAGE-MIGRATIONS-DEATH: D.A.R. article (quoted in father's notes) indicates Rebecca Borden was second wife. In 1800 migrated to Hancock Co. GA and settled on Buffalo Creek. These old pioneers died in their old home and are buried on the old Arnold plantation in Hancock Co.

REFERENCES: North Carolina Records, Vol. 4, P. 649 and Judge Frank L. Little's Sasnett Family Record Book.


Rebecca Randolph Borden

EMIGRATION-RELATIONSHIP: Sasnett was of Edgecombe Co., N.C. In 1800's he settled in Hancock Co., Georgia. Rebecca Borden died of consumption. A Mrs. Rebecca Sasnett Green in an article to the Joseph Havesham Chapter of the D.A.R. writes, "She is descended through Rebecca who married Richard Sasnett."


Solomon Saunders

Son William Saunders married Mary (Polly) Borden 2nd Great Aunt to T.Mason

RESEARCHER: Fay B Kitchens sent informtion to T.Mason in Sep2001. (Transcribed by Fay Kitchens on September 2, 2001. COMMENT: At the beginning that it was proven in 1779, but the writing is very clear to be 1778, which can't be right if the will was written in the fall of 1778.)

Will Book One, 1769-1762, Northampton Co., NC. Will 217, p. 322
Will of Solomon Saunders November 1778 proved March Court 1779

In the name of God amen. I Solomon Saunders of the county Northampton and province of North Carolina planter being sick and weak in body but of sound and disposing mind and memory thanks be unto almighty God for the same do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say first and financial inventory my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it trusting to receiver the same again at the last day wishful and full pardon of all my sins through the ....meditation my beloved Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and my body I commit to the earth to be decently internd at the discretion of my executors hereafter mentioned ... and as for such worldy goods and chattels lands and tenements as it hath been pleased Almighty God to bestow upon me. I give and dispose and bequeath the same as followeth. I will that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid and discharged.

Item I lend to my beloved wife Christian Saunders all my estate to her in during her widowhood or till my children comes of age and if in case that my wife should live a widow after my children comes of age.

Item I lend my negro wench Briget and my negroman Will and my negro wench Tidd(?) and six head of cattle and six head of sheep and one mare one feather bed three chairs and four plates and one dish one bason one chest and the use of my manor plantation and half the land use during her widowhood.

Item I give and bequeath to my son William Saunders my negro man Will and my negro wench Tidd(?) and her increase and my negro boy ... also three hundred and twenty acres of land to him and his heirs forever and also one hundred and twenty pounds of Virginia money.

Item I give and bequeath unto my son Solomon Saunders my negro boy Salve and my negro gal ... and my negro gal Selah and my negro wench Briget also my manor plantation with three hundred and twenty acres of land to him and his heirs forever.

Item I give and bequeath all the rest of my estate to be equally dividedbetween my two sons William and Solomon Saunders after my wife's manage and I do hereby nominate and constitute my friend John Knox and Thomas Knox to be my true and lawful executors and executors of this my last will and testament hearby nominate recording and dis...all from and other wills and testaments whatever here to fore by me made ... this and ... Other to be my last will and testament in witness whereas I have set hereunto my hand and seal this 7th of November 1778 Signed, sealed and published ... and delivered by Solomon Saunders as of his last will and testament in the presents of Jas. Vinson, Edwin Bridges, and Lydia Vinson. Signed: Solomon Saunders

Northampton Co. March Court 1778 (The writing stated plainly 1778, but seems to be that this should be 1779)

The preceding will of Solomon Saunders was .... into court proved by oath of James Vinson, Edward Bridges Lydia Vinson three of the subscribing witnesses thereto Ordered to be certified and recorded. Signed: (writing ineligible)


Richard Joseph Sasnett Jr.

MILITARY: letter from Elizabeth (Betsy) deParry to TMason, 27Jun1999; ; EXTRACT: Private in Capt. Joseph Borden's Command of Mounted Riflemen under General Morgan and participated in battles of Kings Mountain, Cowpens and Guilford Courthouse.

MARRIAGE-MIGRATIONS-DEATH: D.A.R. article (quoted in father's notes) indicates Rebecca Borden was second wife. In 1800 migrated to Hancock Co. GA and settled on Buffalo Creek. These old pioneers died in their old home and are buried on the old Arnold plantation in Hancock Co.

REFERENCES: North Carolina Records, Vol. 4, P. 649 and Judge Frank L. Little's Sasnett Family Record Book.


Richard Sasnett

IMMIGRATION: letter from Elizabeth (Betsy) deParry to TMason, 27Jun1999; ; EXTRACT from an article in D.A.R. magazine, page 451, June 1927: Came to America with Hugenotts. Settled first on the Pee Dee River not far from Georgetown, SC. In the records of Tarboro, NC, Richard and Henrietta Sasnett's names are signed to a deed in 1753 and 1763 to a deed in Edgecomb Co. NC.

WILL: Edgecomb County J. November Court, 1795; Will Book "C" page 339. Full text in possn of Elizabeth deParry. EXTRACT: Names of children and slaves listed.

LAND: Deed Records, Edgecomb Co. N.C. EXTRACT: Book C, page 535, deed dated __ day of Sept. 1768, from James Forehand, to Richard Sarsnett, conveying 152 acres of Mill Swamp.
Book D, page 6, deed dated __ 1769, from Richard Sarsnett to Isaac Wilson, conveying 152 acres of Mill Swamp.
Deed Book D, page 372, deed from William Newton to Richard Sasnett, dated 1771, conveying - ?
Book 3, page 167, dated __ 1777, from Malachi Mound and wife to Richard Sasnett, conveying ?
Book 3, page 440, dated __ 1779, from State to Richard Sasnett, grant of a sizeable tract of land, described by metes and bounds, running from a pine stump to the lands of A, to a stream, following the stream to the lands of B, to a sycamore tree, etc. back to point of beginning. This is obviously the "Plantation" referred to in the Will of Richard Sarsnett, "Sener".
The last deed of many running to and from Sasnett (Sarsnett) recorded among the records of Eilgecomb County was one dated in 1855 from Henry Sasnett to Joshua Killebrew. Apparently at that time they had sold out all their holdings and moved to Georgia.


Henrietta Maria Gosney

RESEARCHER: Information provided to T.Mason on 17 May 2002 by Beth Shields [Gosney7@aol.com]. "Marriages of Early Edgecombe Co., NC 1733 - 1868 by R. S. Williams & M. G. Griffin (1958) under Marriages Proved by Edgecombe Co. Wills - Henrietta Maria Gosney mar. Richard Sasnett, Will Bk. A, p. 181, Will of John Gosney 1779 (think s/b 1769) and Oney Gosney mar. William Griffes (sic). NOT included on Marriage Records of Edgecombe Co. C. H."


Maj. James Lawson

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Frank Gibson Thibault Jr,; dated 19 Apr 1992 sent to T Mason; NOTES: Story is from Lillian (Scott) Thibault, that James Lawson Sr was to marry Charlotte (Beck) Borden both of whom had been married before and had children by their previous marriage. The daughter of Charlotte was named similarly to her as was Lawson's son to him. Young Lawson Jr went to pick up the daughter from the train and they fell in love and were later married.

Dutch has Charlotte Borden the first originally Charlotte Beck 1782-1854.

BIOGRAPHY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Frank Gibson Thibault Jr.; dated 19 Apr 1992 sent to T Mason; SOURCE: Letter to Mrs A E Pritchard LR from cuz Sam Reyburn, Sarasota FL 2 14 1954 page 4 "James Lawson, protestant scotch born in north of Ireland about 1771. Attended the Episcopal (Church of England) Trinity college in Dublin where he graduated in 1791. He joined the revolt against England lead by Wolf Tone, known as "Wolf Tone's Rebellion". The movement failed by the decisive defeat of Tone's forces in 1793. He and a number of officer's on his staff including Lawson escaped and came to America. The younger men took up their residence and became American citizens. Lawson and Tone's son were among this number. about 1795 Tone went to France and financed by Napoleon in 1798 started to Ireland, with three or four ships of munitions and French army officers to start another revolt. They were captured; Tone was recognized, tried condemed to be hung, but cut his own throat. I know some of his son's descendents-fine people - good Americans. While the marriage of the Episcopal widower and the Presbyterian widow, he about 54 and she 44 was a most happy one, their marriage was without children. They came to Arkansas before their children in 1834 or 1835. They were well educated well read and took a great interest in public affairs, churches, schools and people. He was active and influencial, I think in county politics. Mayor John C. Peay knew and admired him and told me a great deal about him. A great joke on him, the generation before me in our family used to tell, was that when his son about 1840, ran for sheriff of Pulaski county, thinking his boy would easily be elected he didn't try to help and even, as he thought an old time gentleman should, cast his vote for his sons opponent. To his surprise the election resulted in a tie vote - then in the run off (or runover) he got out and canvassed the whole county for his son who won by a nice majority. The old bible was burned with the residence of Mrs. Scott sic 1903 and I don't know exactly but I think G.G. father died in 1848 and G.G. mother in 1854."

Ark Banner, 4 17 1844, Obit. C69 died 4 10 1884 at the res. of son James Jr, Pulaski Cnty b. Ireland. One of the patriots of 1798 came to US c1800.

Book A pg 255 Duplin Co Wills-- Sarah Kenan died Duplin Co 1819 will witnessed by James Lawson and Ann Stafford

Naturalization Records Westmoreland Co PA-- Lawson, James Native of Ireland. Living in Fairfield twp. was residing in US prior to 29 Jan 1795. (has lived in the US 2 yr and PA 1 yr).


Charlotte Caroline Beck

OBITUARY: Family History Records; ; compiled by Frank Gibson Thibault Jr. ; ; dated 19 Apr 1992 sent to T Mason; SOURCE: Arkansas Gazette; 1854; ; pg 3 col 6; EXTRACTION: Died -- In this city at the residence of Major Lawson, on Sunday 28th ult., Mrs. Charlotte Lawson in the 72d year of her age.
   The deceased was a native of Dauphin county, North Carolina; her maiden name was Charlotte Beck. She intermarried with Dr. Levi Borden, in the year 1800, and became the mother of ten children, all of whom were reared to mature age. Upon the death of Dr. Borden, she was married a second time to Mr. James Lawson, Sr., with whom she emigrated to this state in 1836. Here she remained until the day of her decease.
   At an early age the deceased made a profession of religion, and became a member of the Presbyterian Church, with which she maintained her connexion until the day of her death, both in North Carolina and Arkansas. The sincerity of her faith was evinced by a life of vital Godliness, closed by a peaceful and happy death. She loved the house of God, and allowed no circumstance of minor importance to keep her from the sanctuary. Few perhaps enjoyed the ordinances of that sacred place more than did she; they were to her emphatically her meat and her drink. She remarked to a friend of the writer, a short time before her death, that "although she could hear but little that was said from the pulpit, yet the house of God was pleasanter to her than any other place." She adorned by a consistent walk all the relations of life, and has been gathered, a shock of corn ripe for the garner of the Lord. While we sympathize with her children in their bereavement, we praise our faithful God, who has thus taken to himself another of his redeemed ones.