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Terry Mason's Family History Site

Major lines: Allen, Beck, Borden, Buck, Burden, Carpenter, Carper, Cobb, Cook, Cornell, Cowan, Daffron, Davis, Downing, Faubion, Fauntleroy, Fenter, Fishback, Foulks, Gray, Harris, Heimbach, Henn, Holland, Holtzclaw, Jackson, Jameson, Johnson, Jones, King, Lewis, Mason, Massengill, McAnnally, Moore, Morgan, Overstreet, Price, Peck, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Samuel, Smith, Taylor, Thomas, Wade, Warren, Weeks, Webb, Wodell, Yeiser.

 

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Robert Dale Owen

REFERENCE-HYPERELINK: http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/bstud/rdowen.html

Robert Dale Owen was the eldest son of British social reformer Robert Owen. In 1825, both moved to New Harmony, Indiana, where the son soon became editor of the town's first newspaper, the New Harmony Gazette. Robert Owen had purchased the town in order to establish a community based on his principles of social reform. By 1827, the community had lapsed into individualism, the father had returned to England, and the son had begun working closely with social reformer Frances Wright. Together they traveled to her experimental community at Nashoba, Tennessee, then Europe, and then to New York, where he became editor of the radical freethought newspaper, Free Enquirer.

From Leopold's biography of Owen; used by permission of the Harvard University Press and Harvard University Department of History.

By 1833, the freethought movement had waned, and R. D. Owen moved back to New Harmony. He served in the Indiana legislature (1836-38) and U. S. House of Representatives (1843-47), where he introduced the bill establishing the Smithsonian Institution. Owen served as chairman of the Smithsonian Building Committee (link below). Later, he held the diplomatic position of charge d'affairs (1853-1858) in Naples, Italy.
In the 1850's, R. D. Owen began studying spiritualism, and in 1860, his book Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World aroused something of a literary sensation. Among his hecklers in the Boston Investigator and at home in the New Harmony Advertiser were John and Margaret Chappellsmith, he formerly an artist for David Dale Owen's geological publications, and she a former Owenite lecturer.
On September 17, 1862, R. D. Owen wrote a letter to President Abraham Lincoln urging the end American slavery.
"It is within your power...," he wrote, "as the instrument of the Almighty, to restore to freedom a race of men." Five days later the Emancipation Proclamation was read to the cabinet.
Some of R. D. Owen's better known writings are these:
*Popular Tracts, (with Frances Wright and others), 14 volumes in one, New York, 1830. (Various subsequent editions.)
*Threading My Way: Twenty-seven Years of Autobiography, New York, 1874.
*The Wrong of Slavery, the Right of Emancipation, and the Future of the African Race in the United States, Philadelphia, 1864. Reprinted, Kraus Reprint Co., New York, 1969.

In commemoration of the centennial of Robert Dale Owen's death in 1877, a descendent of his brother, Richard Owen, generously enabled the publication of a work previously unknown to historians: Josephine M. Elliott, editor, Robert Dale Owen's Travel Journal, 1827, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, 1977.


Marriage Notes for Robert Dale Owen and Mary Jane Robinson-35188

Marriage took place without the presence of a clergyman. A letter was soon published, possibly without Owen's consent, and subsequently republished many times. It must be remembered that at the time of this wedding, the wife and her possessions became, by law, property of the husband.

"This afternoon I enter into a matrimonial engagement with Mary Jane Robinson... We contract a legal marriage, not because we deem the ceremony necessary to us, or useful ... to society; but because, if we became companions without a legal ceremony, we should ... be perpetually exposed to annoyances, originating in a public opinion [which] we do not perceive the utility of unnecessarily braving.
We have selected the simplest ceremony which the laws of this state recognize ...
Of the unjust rights which, in virtue of this ceremony, an iniquitous law tacitly gives me over the person and property of another, I cannot legally, but I can morally divest myself. And I hereby distinctly and emphatically declare, that I consider myself, and earnestly desire to be considered by others, as utterly divested, now and during the rest of my life, of any such rights ...
I put down these sentiments on paper this morning, as a simple record of the views and feelings with which I enter into [the] engagement ...
Beneath the signature of her husband, Mary wrote, "I concur in these sentiments." "


David Madison Borden

David served CSA in Co. F, 31st Al. Inf. as a private. He was at surrender of Vicksburg, Ms and recaputured at Big Shanty, Ga. He was sent to Rock Island Federal Prison, then tranferred to National Navy to work. He escaped before the War ended. Returned to Alabama and the family left Alabama for Texas. Was Deputy Sheriff of Robertson Co, Tx. was injured by a train in line of duty in downtown Franklin. He died as result of legs being cutoff by train.


David Madison Borden

David served CSA in Co. F, 31st Al. Inf. as a private. He was at surrender of Vicksburg, Ms and recaputured at Big Shanty, Ga. He was sent to Rock Island Federal Prison, then tranferred to National Navy to work. He escaped before the War ended. Returned to Alabama and the family left Alabama for Texas. Was Deputy Sheriff of Robertson Co, Tx. was injured by a train in line of duty in downtown Franklin. He died as result of legs being cutoff by train.


Jane N. Stewart

In 1900 census showing her son Walter as head. Her birth date in the 1900 census is Jun 1849. That contradicts her age of 15 given at the time of her marriage meaning that she was born in 1862. She does state in 1900 that she had seven children all who were living.


William David Borden

In the 1900 census is listed as born Dec 1885.


John DeCraft Borden

In 1900 U.S. Census listed as born July 1890


Nancy Sarah Nash

In 1880 census with son-in-law, David Borden and daughter Jennie.


Will E. Frost

DESCENDANTS: Information sent to T.Mason on 29 Oct 2004 by Jessica McManus


Marriage Notes for Will E. Frost and Josephine Clyde Borden-13593

Robertson County Clerks marriage record in Franklin, Texas, Book 12 page 407.